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Console screen resolution not changing, and appearing too small

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Increasing virtual machine display resolution to a custom resolution beyond the maximum resolution listed in Microsoft Windows (2058577)

You are unable to change the screen resolution of a Microsoft Windows virtual machine beyond the maximum resolution available in Display Properties .

This article provides steps for manually setting the video display resolution in Microsoft Windows virtual machines beyond the available resolutions in Display Properties.

To resolve this issue:

  • Follow the procedure outlined in Adding video resolution modes to Windows guest operating systems (1003) .
  • Open an Administrative Command prompt and navigate to the VMware Tools Folder.
  • Run VMwareResolution.exe to force Windows to set your desired resolution.

Adding video resolution modes to Windows guest operating systems 仮想マシンの画面の解像度を Microsoft Windows で表示される設定可能上限より上げる方法

  • VMware vSphere ESXi
  • VMware vSphere ESXi 6.7
  • VMware vSphere ESXi 6.5

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You can configure the display resolution preferences that determine how a virtual machine is displayed only after resizing the window in VMware Remote Console .

Prerequisites

  • On Windows, select VMRC > Preferences .
  • On macOS, select VMRC > Preferences .
  • On Linux, select File > Remote Console Preferences .
  • Select Display .

These display resolution preferences apply to both normal window and full screen mode.

How to change screen resolution with command on Windows 10

You can change your computer's screen resolution using Command Prompt on Windows 10 — here's how.

Avatar for Mauro Huculak

  • To change resolution with commands on Windows 10, open the “QRes” app with Command Prompt and run the “QRes.exe /x:1680 /y:1050” command.
  • In the command, change the horizontal (x) and vertical (y) values with the screen resolution you want to apply.

On Windows 10, it’s possible to change the resolution through Command Prompt, but you’ll need a third-party app, and in this guide, you will learn how.

Although you can always change the screen resolution using the “Display” settings, Windows 10 doesn’t include a command-line equivalent feature for adjusting the screen resolution using Command Prompt or PowerShell. Such a feature would come in handy to quickly change the screen resolution for certain apps and games that work best at specific resolutions. Also, using a command-line tool allows you to automate the process with a script and even with the Task Scheduler.

However, if you must change the monitor’s resolution with commands, you can use QRes by Anders Kjersem . This small tool doesn’t require installation and allows you to adjust the display pixel resolution through Command Prompt.

This guide will teach you the steps to select a different display resolution for your monitor on Windows 10 using commands.

Change screen resolution on Windows 10 from Command Prompt

Change screen resolution on windows 10 from script.

To change screen resolution with commands on Windows 10, use these steps:

Download QRes from this website.

Right-click the QRes.zip file and select the Extract All button.

Click the Extract button.

Type CMD and press Enter in add “QRes” folder address bar to open Command Prompt in the location.

Type the following command to change the Windows 10 screen resolution and press Enter :

Change screen resolution using Command Prompt

In the command, change the path for the “QRes.exe” file, and enter a supported width (x) and height (y) pixel resolution. For example, 1366 x 768, 1440 x 900, 1680 x 1050, 1920 x 1080, 2560 x 1440, etc.

Once you complete the steps, the screen will change to the specified resolution.

Alternatively, you can use QRes to create a file script, which you can double-click or schedule with Task Scheduler to change the display resolution automatically.

To create a script to change the screen resolution on Windows 10, use these steps:

Open Start .

Search for Notepad and click the top result to open the app.

Copy and paste the following command:

Script to change resolution automatically

Click the File menu.

Select the Save As option.

Save the batch file with a descriptive name and a “.bat” file extension.

After completing the steps, double-click the batch file, and the screen resolution should change automatically without extra steps.

If you need to change the display resolution constantly, creating another batch file is recommended to restore the original resolution. You can always find out about all the solutions supported by your monitor on Settings > System > Display .

Avatar for Mauro Huculak

Mauro Huculak is a Windows expert and the Editor-in-Chief who started Pureinfotech in 2010 as an independent online publication. He is also been a Windows Central contributor for nearly a decade. Mauro has over 12 years of experience writing comprehensive guides and creating professional videos about Windows, software, and related technologies, including Android and Linux. Before becoming a technology writer, he was an IT administrator for seven years. In total, Mauro has over 20 years of combined experience in technology. Throughout his career, he achieved different professional certifications from Microsoft (MSCA), Cisco (CCNP), VMware (VCP), and CompTIA (A+ and Network+), and he has been recognized as a Microsoft MVP for many years. You can follow him on X (Twitter) , YouTube , LinkedIn and About.me .

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task set console window screen resolution

Rick Strahl's Weblog  

task set console window screen resolution

SetResolution: Setting Windows Display Resolution from the Terminal

task set console window screen resolution

Download SetResolution from GitHub

I recently started using a desktop machine with a single attached 4k monitor after years of running on laptops with at least a dual screen setup. The single large 4k screen at 100% resolution works great in most situations, except I recently also started having constant meetings that require interactive screen sharing and the need to quickly bump resolution down to a meager 1080p or something even smaller. Eeek!.

Doing this interactively in Windows using the Windows Display Settings Widget is a pain in the ass: It requires a bunch of UI navigation and mouse clickery to get to the Display Dialog, then scroll down to the Resolution picker and then pick a mode of the long list of options. Then make sure to click ' Keep Settings ' to accept. It takes a bit. Yeeeech!

Do it yourself

A bit of searching didn't reveal any tools that let you quickly switch resolutions, so I sat down to create a small command line utility that lets me do just that. How hard could it be, right?

The end result is a SetResolution tool that looks something like this:

task set console window screen resolution

The idea is that you can quickly switch display modes via pre-configured profiles that specify a resolution, frequency, color bitness and if support screen orientation. Alternately you can just explicitly screen sizes and the other options directly.

The tool can:

  • Set an explicit Display Resolution
  • Create and use Display Mode Profiles for quick access
  • List all available Display Modes and Monitors
  • Support multiple Monitors
  • Prompt for confirmation by default to avoid invalid display modes

The full command syntax looks like this:

task set console window screen resolution

After a couple of days with the tool and dozens of screen sharing sessions later, I can honestly say this was worth the couple of days of Windows Hardware hackery it took. It's making it much quicker to quickly jump back and forth between different display resolutions.

Download Binary and C# Project on GitHub

If this is something that sounds useful you can download the binary file, or check out the full source code on GitHub.

The output binary of this project, is a single-file Exe that you can just download as is and install anywhere on your machine, preferably in a folder that is referenced in your system path for easy access from anywhere.

Get it here:

  • Download single file binary directly (GitHub)
  • GitHub Repository

For .NET developers, you can also quickly install this utility as a Dotnet Tool using the .NET 6.0 SDK

task set console window screen resolution

Building SetResolution

As is often the case with these hare-brained ideas, I started out with a simple desire for a nice evening hacking job that ended up turning into a full weekend hacking job instead.

First of all credit where credit is due: The initial code I used to get and set screen resolutions in Windows via the various Display Settings Win32 APIs ( EnumDisplaySettings() , ChangeDisplaySettings() ) are based on an old article I found on C# Corner by Mohammad Elseheimy :

  • Changing Display Settings Programmatically

This nice article does the hard work of pulling together all the PInvoke calls required to get all available display settings, apply a set of display settings, and return the current settings. Mohammed's code describes the required APIs and provides the PInvoke code along with a C# wrapper, which served as the base and proof of concept to allow me to build the basic resolution switching code.

For the first cut I essentially built a Console application front end around around these core APIs to allow displaying available display modes, setting a display mode, and also creating Profiles that can store the display settings into a named setting that you be quickly recalled with a single command.

I realized a few more things were needed to make this more usable:

  • Filtering the Display Modes list down to a useful number to display (some drivers have hundreds of modes )
  • Adding support for multiple monitors/display devices
  • Making sure you don't lock up your screen by allowing for undoing of a setting

I'm not going to rehash code in this post, since the original article from Mohammad breaks down the most relevant PInvoke code that is the meat of all this.

However, the original article doesn't discuss multiple monitors so I did have to get my hands dirty adding support for retrieving multiple monitors and applying the available display modes to a specific display driver and monitor combination.

Turns out this was a bit tricky due to the funky nested API calls required to retrieve the monitor and related display driver and available modes as well as some APIs that used different string behavior than the similar APIs Mohammed had already built and were working fine with standard PInvoke string marshalling.

Ah the joys of Windows API inconsistencies from API to API 😄

I stuck with the original classes and added the DisplayManager.GetAllDisplayDevices() method and all the related native APIs required for this implementation. The DisplayManager and DisplayManagerNative classes are self-contained and can be easily used outside of this project if you need this behavior in your own apps.

If you're interested all the code is on GitHub, so have at it.

All in all this was a nice change of pace for a fun side project for me and it has already proven to be very useful as I continue to flip back and forth between presentation modes and the full 4k on my single monitor. It's been a nice workflow enhancing tool for me.

I hope some of you also find this SetResolution tool useful...

task set console window screen resolution

Bonus: Share part of your big screen using ScreenToGif

As I was looking for ways to share my screen in meetings in reasonable sizes, I thought of another cool way to share only part of my 4k screen in a presentation .

Most Screen Sharing tools like Skype, Zoom, GotoMeeting, Teams etc. maddeningly let you only share either the entire screen, or an individual window, but not an area of your screen . Individual windows sometimes work, especially if everything can be done in a browser, but I find for the work I do I often end up having to share multiple application windows. For single screen sharing though other windows tend to display as grey boxes which is less than useful. What I really could use in some cases is to share an aproximately 1080p sized window of my 4k screen parked in one corner of the 4k screen. Or - have a way to share a window and al the content that overlays it. It's certainly possible as screen capture tools like CamTasia or ScreenToGif do it, so why not a meeting tool? Seems like a missed usability opportunity.

Alas - turns out you can do this one of these screen capture tools. I'm using Nicke Martin's excellent ScreenToGif Utility in an unconventional way as a sharing window . Using ScreenToGif 's capture window I can select a portion of my screen and 'outline' in it in the capture window. But rather than use if for capturing a screencast, I can now share the ScreenToGif window in Skype, Zoom, Teams etc.

Here's what that looks like:

task set console window screen resolution

I can now drag any window into the capture area, and any of that content is shared in the meeting because it lives within the display of the target window. Sweet!

Note that the reason this works is because ScreenToGif's classic mode displays as a regular Win32 window, the content of which is used to capture moving content for creating animated GIF/APNG etc. files. Apparently STG is in the process of introducing a new capture mode that doesn't use a window but a selection area - this does not work because the sharing tools look for windows that can be shared. Looks like STG's classic mode will still be available via options though. So you might have to stick with 'classic' mode to get the sharing functionality to work for meeting window capture.

Anyway, this is another useful tool for quickly sharing a small content area from your massive 4k screen.

  • SetResolution single file binary download (GitHub)
  • SetResolution GitHub Repository
  • ScreenToGif

task set console window screen resolution

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Colin Westwater

Colin Westwater

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VM Console Display Resolution Change

August 19, 2018 2 minute read

Introduction

Recently I noticed that when logging into VM’s at the console level through vCenter the resolution was all messed up. I set the VM’s at 1280x800 but was seeing resolutions all over the place.

It turned out people were using the Virtual Machine Remote Console or Web Console from vCenter to access the VM’s console and it was changing the resolution of the VM’s operating system to whatever the size of the web browser window was set to.

Annoying more than anything but after a couple of times finding someone with a HD monitor in portrait resolution setting the VM to 1080x1920 I decided to see what was going on and stop it.

VMware KB52031

I noticed this seemed to be happening since we upgraded to vCenter 6.5 so after some Googling I found the VMware KB article:

How to disable auto-fitting of Windows guest OS screen resolution when accessing from Web Client and VMRC (52031)

The symptoms fitted exactly what I was seeing and tested:

When opening or resizing VMRC of any versions or Web Console of Web Client 6.5, the screen resolution of Windows Guest OS changes to fit the window size of the client if the guest OS is Windows. This results in changing the screen resolution of the guest.

The fix is not so good. You need to modify the vmx file of the VM when it is powered off. Not great. The settings are:

guestInfo.svga.wddm.modeset=”FALSE” guestInfo.svga.wddm.modesetCCD=”FALSE” guestInfo.svga.wddm.modesetLegacySingle=”FALSE” guestInfo.svga.wddm.modesetLegacyMulti=”FALSE”

This can be done a couple of ways but I whipped up a quick PowerCLI script to change the vmx file quickly when I have one off for regular maintenance. As this issue is just annoying I am not scheduling an outage for the VM’s to make the change, but only when I have VM’s that I can take a quick outage on.

PowerCLI script

First of all power off the VM from the OS, the console, vCenter, PowerCLI or whatever way you want. Make sure the VM is powered off.

The script is pretty straightforward. First connect to vCenter:

You will be prompted for credentials to connect.

Next we will prompt for a VM name that we want to change and define it into a variable:

Now the VM is off we can add the lines to the vmx file. The PowerCLI cmdlet is New-AdvancedSetting :

We can now power on the VM:

Here is the full script:

Short and simple post and script to fix this ‘issue’. Now the resolution of the VM’s console can only be modified in the OS or through Group Policy which what I want.

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How to adjust virtual machine display resolution to adapt to full screen

I've used VirtualBox before, and am new to Hyper-V.

On my Win10 desktop, I've installed a virtual machine of CentOS, and hope to make its display resolution fully utilize my hardware capacity (1920 x 1080).

For Hyper-V,

  • in context of "Hyper-V Manager > host > Hyper-V Settings > Enhanced Session Mode", I've checked the box of "Use enhanced session mode";
  • in context of "Hyper-V Manager > vm > Settings > Integration Services", I've checked all the boxes, including "Guest services".

When I maximize the connection, the window maximizes to full screen but the guest operating system reminds at lower resolution as "1152 x 864 (4:3)", and that was the only option in the Linux context of "root user > Taskbar > Applications > System Tools > Settings > Devices > Displays".

I hope to make the guest Linux operating system adapt to full screen display resolution, and any pointers will be highly appreciated.

Please also let me know if you need additional information.

Hyper-V A Windows technology providing a hypervisor-based virtualization solution enabling customers to consolidate workloads onto a single server. 2,452 questions Sign in to follow

From your description, we find the issue is related to Hyper-v, I would remove the tag of "msc-virtual-machine-manager-hyper-v", which represents deploying Hyper-v in SCVMM. And add the tag "windows-server-hyper-v" for you. Thanks!

I know this a few years off for answering this question, but I thought I would add it to help others since this was one of the first post I saw when searching for an answer. Enhanced Session will give you the option to select the resolution while Guest will not. If you don't need it, disable Enhanced Session as a rule for new VMs.

https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/powershell/module/hyper-v/set-vmvideo?view=windowsserver2019-ps

Using powershell on your Win10 system, have the Hyper-V manager launched.

Within your powershell console use the following:

You can change the resolution to your needs. The resolutiontype as single makes this the only resolution available for the VM. Look at the Microsoft link above for more information if you want to dig deeper into the command.

It worked, thanks.

Thank you for your reply!

After my research, the grubby command may only work for a few screen resolution. Based on your descriptions, your failure to use this command is related to the poor support from your driver for your graphics card. I suggest you can first try to open up a huge of resolutions for your graphics card. The article below is suitable for Centos 7:

https://superuser.com/questions/750382/how-to-change-resolution-of-centos-6-5-resolution-on-virtualbox-host-win7

(Please note: Information posted in the given link is hosted by a third party. Microsoft does not guarantee the accuracy and effectiveness of information.)

Secondly, you can try some other solutions to solve your issue. Here are some methods you can try:

1)Reinstalled the system in a fresh VM, and re-applying the grubby command

2)To install xrdp and use remote desktop. See article:

https://www.itzgeek.com/how-tos/linux/centos-how-tos/install-xrdp-on-centos-7-rhel-7.html

More information you can find: https://superuser.com/questions/1118192/updating-the-screen-resolution-in-centos7-in-hyper-v

If you still cannot maximize your resolution, I guess you may have to change your drive which can better support your graphics card. And you can ask your retailer for this information.

Thank you for your support!

Best regards Joann

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The correct answer to this is to use Remote Desktop instead of launching the VM directly through the Hyper-V launcher. If you have Hyper-V, then you have Windows Pro so just enable Remote Desktop and search "Remote Desktop" in the taskbar search. If the target machine is Linux OS, find an RDP server like xrdp, enable it, start it, find the ip of the target machine, and use that to connect from from Remote Desktop. If the target machine is Windows, you'll have to enable RDP through the settings and do the same thing.

Thank you for your posting!

Based on your descriptions, first I would like to explain your issue:

"1152 x 864 (4:3)" is the default screen resolution and the way that you have tried: "root user > Taskbar > Applications > System Tools > Settings > Devices > Displays" is for Ubuntu Hyper-V guests and is not suitable for CentOS and Red Hat VMs.

In this case, you can use the grubby tool to change your screen resolution in CentOS to the biggest size that you want. You can follow the steps in the video to setup:

https://www.netometer.com/blog/?p=1663

Thank you for your time!

Thank you for your help.

I followed the below link, and called command grubby --update-kernel=ALL --args="video=hyperv_fb:1920x1080" ; but it doesn't work. https://www.netometer.com/blog/?p=1663

After reboot, the virtual machine will stuck forever at start with a black screen, and eventually I had to power cycle the virtual machine, and boot into rescue mode by choosing "CentOS Linux (0-rescure-xxx...) 7 Core" from the boot menu.

I used command grabby again and changed display resolution back to the original default value (1152x864), and the virtual machine recovered to normal.

I'm wondering, did I miss anything in the steps here? Any hints will be highly appreciated.

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esxi 6.5 how to turn off autofit window / automatic display resolution change

after I installed VMware Tools on virtual machine its resolution adjusts to the console window size automatically. It is not what I want - I want that the resolution of my virtual machine stays the same.

It is VMware ESXi 6.5, where is only web console available.

It is happening only after installing VMware Tools (i need it of course).

Anyone knows how to turn it off ?

I tried to use some forums tips with setting: svga.MaxWidth/svga.MaxHeight parameters, but it doesn't work...

  • virtualization
  • vmware-esxi
  • vmware-vsphere

Moritz Both's user avatar

  • 4 We are running automatic ui tests on vmware clients. When a remote console connects, often tests fail because the screen resolution gets too low and the test tool does not find controls. So I have the same problem, hereby adding a use case. –  Moritz Both Nov 23, 2017 at 14:59
  • Can you provide some additional information? What patch level are you running 6.5, are you using Flash or HTML5 browser, what about vmware player, what version of windows/linux. –  Jacob Evans Nov 27, 2017 at 20:34
  • I am using HTML5 browser. Automatic resolution change happens both with HTML5 Browser console and with plugin (vmrc) as well as with VMware Workstation connecting to the vSphere Server. vSphere Client Version 6.5.0.10000. The guests are mostly windows 7. The clients using the remote console are different Windows and Linux versions, but I think that does not matter since the resolution change is done by the vmware tools. –  Moritz Both Nov 30, 2017 at 11:45
  • General hint: The bounty expires in three hours. If anybody has a solution, I will gladly start another one :) –  Moritz Both Nov 30, 2017 at 11:51
  • 1 How to disable auto-fitting of Windows guest OS screen resolution when accessing from Web Client and VMRC (52031) kb.vmware.com/s/article/52031 –  Brad Sep 21, 2018 at 15:09

3 Answers 3

Found a solution!!

Windows Client resolution changes work by calling <ProgramDir>\VMware\VMware Tools\VMwareResolutionSet.exe . After I renamed that file, bingo no more resolution changes. Obviously this works until the next VMware tools update only, but it does the job for us.

Since it is not easy to find, here is the reference for VMwareResolutionSet.exe from a random forum thread at https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/2058577

Run VMwareResolutionSet.exe to force Windows to set your desired resolution. VMwareResolutionSet.exe Variable1 Variable2 , Variable3 Variable4 Variable5 Variable6 Variable 1 is the index of the primary monitor (Default = 0). Variable 2 is the number of total monitors (Default = 1). Variable 3 is the starting X position of monitor 0 (Default = 0). Variable 4 is the starting Y position of monitor 0 (Default = 0). Variable 5 is the width (X) of monitor 0 in pixels. Variable 6 is the width (Y) of monitor 0 in pixels. For Example, to set the virtual machine display resolution to 3280 x 2048: VMwareResolutionSet.exe 0 1 , 0 0 3280 2048

The spaces around the comma seem to be significant.

Try using the html5 interface with the remote console plugin (VMRC) and set the resolution within the OS. That solved this issue for me, anyway.

A couple of tricks to getting the remote console plugin working correctly:

It likes to be run elevated. So after installing the remote console plugin, find the vmrc.exe file using Explorer, right click, select Properties -> Compatibility tab -> check the Change settings for all users option and Run this program as an administrator .

That should save you some additional headaches. There are known issues with the Flash client, and I even read somewhere that the Flash version is being discontinued at some point.

Bill's user avatar

  • What do you mean when you say "set the resolution within the OS"? Every time you connect, that is? That's not an option. This does not help me with the problem. Also, running vmrc.exe elevated adds security risks and sorry, if vmware cannot tell me why this would be neccessary I won't do this. –  Moritz Both Nov 30, 2017 at 11:49
  • Sorry for such a delayed response. Holidays and all that. Since you did not specify which operating system you installed, I can only give examples. In windows, right click and select display settings to set the resolution. I suggest editing your post to include the specific operating system you are having trouble with. –  Bill Jan 12, 2018 at 19:06
  • 1 It is changed back on every connect. This is what op (and me) wanted to avoid afaik. –  Moritz Both Jan 16, 2018 at 14:19

We had the same issue. Turns out that in the VM settings the video card setting was 'custom'. If you change that to 'auto-detect settings' the problem goes away! You can only change this if the VM is powered off. Unless you need custom settings for a specific reason, this works fine.

Frank Rutten's user avatar

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task set console window screen resolution

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How do I increase console-mode resolution?

When my computer goes to console mode (booting up, shutting down or Ctrl + Alt + F1) ), the text is super big. I can't take a screenshot of it, but it looks like a 640 x 480 resolution. My monitor normally works at 1440 x 900.

I remember that the console text that appeared while installing from the CD was nice and small.

How can I make the console text look like it looked while booting from the CD?

  • display-resolution

Dan's user avatar

10 Answers 10

I've found a solution that works from this forum post

Open /etc/default/grub with your favorite editor as root.

Localize the line that says GRUB_GFXMODE= ... and change it to the resolution you want. Add another line for a new variable called GRUB_GFXPAYLOAD with the same resolution. It should look similar to this:

Save and exit. Then edit as root /etc/grub.d/00_header

Localize the line that says if [ "x${GRUB_GFXMODE}" = "x" ] ; then GRUB_GFXMODE=... . As before, change the resolution there to the one you want and add another line for payload:

Finally, locate the line that says set gfxmode=${GRUB_GFXMODE} and add a line for payload below it. It should look like this:

Save and exit.

Still as root, refresh grub with

Reboot, and both the grub menu and the console should have nicer resolutions.

A.B.'s user avatar

  • 1 My solution will only work for grub2, I think. Are you using grub 1, maybe? If yes, try with a lower resolution first - for example 1024x768x32. Regards! –  egarcia Jan 19, 2011 at 9:59
  • 1 unfortunately didn't work for me, running 10.10 –  segfault May 24, 2011 at 22:12
  • 3 Looks like that at the moment grub2 doesn't use 'GRUB_GFXPAYLOAD' option, only 'GRUB_GFXPAYLOAD_LINUX'. See the official documentation on grub2: gnu.org/software/grub/manual/grub.html#gfxpayload –  mbaitoff Sep 15, 2011 at 9:16
  • 2 It would be more interesting to see a response that is more generic, that will work with most resolutions. –  sorin Nov 17, 2012 at 16:07
  • 2 This answer is depreciated and did not work for me on Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS. Furthermore, it involves editing a file named 00_header which really should not be edited. –  Serge Stroobandt Jun 23, 2014 at 12:34

This helped me on Ubuntu 14.04 with ESXi 5.5 :

Change line to:

Use 795 or 799 for higher resolution (More details here ).

Kulfy's user avatar

  • 1 This solutions worked for me. The splash option froze the login screen and it is unnecessary in my opinion. Btw I really don't like the cryptic options like 792! –  Kyr Jul 10, 2015 at 11:52
  • 1 its deprecated in 15.04 –  Jiří Doubravský Aug 21, 2015 at 21:57
  • works on fedora 21 too –  Alex Jones Aug 31, 2015 at 12:09
  • @JiříDoubravský then what to do? other answers dont work –  Alex Jones Aug 31, 2015 at 12:09
  • 1 reboot command doesn't like the -r option, anyway. –  Jin Kwon Dec 31, 2016 at 16:01
  • Start in the GRUB menu
  • Press C to go to the GRUB command line
  • Run vbeinfo and make a decision (e.g. 1920x1200x32).
  • Start your system again
  • sudo nano /etc/default/grub
  • Change GRUB_GFXMODE= (e.g. GRUB_GFXMODE=1920x1200x32 )
  • Set GRUB_GFXPAYLOAD_LINUX to GRUB_GFXPAYLOAD_LINUX=keep
  • sudo update-grub
  • reboot your system

Foad's user avatar

  • among all the answers on this question, this is the one that worked for me with Ubuntu 16.04 server (and it's the simplest one) –  Seb - SonarSource Team Aug 9, 2016 at 7:57
  • Wrt step 2 above: I find one should press 'c' for a command-line (not 'E') –  kaiwan Oct 12, 2016 at 7:57
  • Doesn't work on VMware Workstation Player with Ubuntu 16.10 –  Sebi2020 Nov 2, 2016 at 23:33
  • 1 @0xC0000022L VMWare Workstation 10 –  Sebi2020 Dec 8, 2017 at 11:22
  • 2 For Ubuntu 18.04 and later, use videoinfo instead of vbeinfo . –  robocat Dec 6, 2018 at 4:00

Set the graphics mode with GRUB_GFXPAYLOAD_LINUX

First, install xrandr and run it:

The available screen modes are listed.

Now, edit /etc/default/grub :

Assuming a previously unedited file, make the following changes:

The variable GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT should contain at least nomodeset , perhaps in addition to quiet and splash on desktop systems.

On server systems, uncomment GRUB_TERMINAL=console to see more messages passing during boot before entering in the graphics console.

Leave this line as a comment:

At the end of the file, add a line:

or replace the value by any other (comma separated) mode(s) that is(are) supported by your hardware. The values text , keep , auto , vga and ask should also work.

Finally, after saving the edited /etc/default/grub with Ctrl + O and exiting it with Ctrl + X , issue the following commands:

This answer will also work to decrease the resolution and/or refresh rate or frame buffer frequency on down-clocked systems. CRT monitors typically show flickering stripes when the refresh frequency is too high.

Community's user avatar

  • 2 there is no hwinfo anymore –  obayhan Feb 12, 2016 at 10:05
  • 1 @obayhan Well noted! You may use xrandr instead. –  Serge Stroobandt Feb 13, 2016 at 15:26
  • 1 Works with 16.04. –  Jin Kwon Dec 31, 2016 at 16:22
  • 1 THIS. This is the only thing that worked for me on 16.10. –  Siguza Mar 7, 2017 at 23:58
  • blurred text :-( –  daGo Apr 14, 2020 at 18:44

Why i answer this threat even if it's very old? The answer is pretty easy, because so many other threat refer to it.

If vbeinfo or hwinfo --framebuffer doesn't show the native resolution of your display, then disable vesa, to do so remove vga= options in:

Search for GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT= and remove vga= if you find it.

If you have remove the option don't forget to generate a new grub.cfg:

If you don't know you did it well, then just reboot and open a terminal:

If grep doesn't show anything, then you removed the vga= option.

Now install uvesafb:

Make sure the uvesafb module is included into your initrd. Add it to the end of /etc/initramfs-tools/modules:

To see what modes are available:

Now configure uvesafb mode_option=YOURxResoultion-BitColorMode e.g. 1280x1024-32:

Don't forget to rebuild your initrd:

Now you can reboot!

See this for more details. It is for debian, but it also works for ubuntu. I hope it helped you and it should be more generic than using grub2.

muru's user avatar

  • +1 no need to change the grub config and uvesafb works for me on Ubuntu 16.04 with a proprietary nvidia driver ( recommended in other places KMS is unsupported in this case) –  jfs Sep 14, 2016 at 13:31

Just some personal background: in my other computer I have no problem with that fancy mode (it's 160 cols x 60 rows, but it has a 4:3 CRT monitor). It's equipped with a TNT2 (yes, I swear), and that mode was promptly displayed on first boot. Problem is, it does this by loading the nouveau driver, and this guy is still a bit faulty (in my case, it hangs the whole system when trying to move windows). So, to have an usable system, I had to downgrade to the old and stable nv driver, and also disabling mode-setting ('cause the kernel would always load nouveau when enabled). Note that I'm not using nVidia proprietary drivers, but like you, I was switched back to 80x25 in console mode.

This is because the nv driver doesn't use kernel mode-setting . Now, I don't know about the proprietary drivers, but I'm guessing they might have changed your configuration in order to be usable, and possibly that's why you're seeing that "big" mode. Possibly they disabled mode-setting when installed. That's why you see the "small" text mode when booting from the Live CD.

You could try booting up with a different VESA mode, but that depends a lot on your hardware. For that, please check http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VESA_BIOS_Extensions#Linux_video_mode_numbers . For example, if you'd like to try booting your text mode on 1024x640, you'll find that the mode ID is 877.

So, when booting, hold the SHIFT key (in case you don't have a GRUB timeout) to bring up GRUB's menu. Select the mode which you wish to boot and press 'e' (to edit the commands). At the end of the "kernel" command, add vga=877 . The number is the mode ID, if you want to try other modes, replace it with the desired number.

Also, at that same Wikipedia page, you could also try the helpful "Universal format" right below the modes table. That hwinfo command is quite useful.

Charles Roberto Canato's user avatar

  • 1 I use grub2, not grub. I didn't know that grub was responsible for the console, so I didn't mention that in my question. Sorry. I've found a solution with grub2. Regards! –  egarcia Dec 22, 2010 at 4:55
  • To be true, the solution you found also seem simpler. Glad you sorted it out, and thanks for sharing! –  Charles Roberto Canato Dec 22, 2010 at 7:03

Ubuntu 18 console mode :

so new line looks like:

where XXX comes from

https://www.pendrivelinux.com/vga-boot-modes-to-set-screen-resolution/

then reload grub config and reboot

Paul Paku's user avatar

  • It seems like this question has already a many similar answers. Perhaps you could clarify what motivated you to add your answer (i.e. what information was missing from previously posted answers). –  cauon Mar 24, 2019 at 11:34
  • 1 It's just simple. And suitable for newest Ubuntu 18 –  Paul Paku Mar 24, 2019 at 14:21
  • 1 "splash quite" is a typo for "splash quiet" - this worthless editor won't let me change just that without making unnecessary changes elsewhere, so maybe you need to add your reasoning in the main body of the answer. –  Rich Dec 17, 2019 at 19:09

This will not change the font on boot, but for the console on Ctrl + Alt + F[1-6]

Install the custom Ubuntu fonts for your console:

And create a script /usr/local/bin/fontset with this command:

(choose the desired fon out of the folder /usr/share/consolefonts/ )

You can either call fontset each time on your console after using Ctrl + Alt + F1

or add this line to your /root/.profile

(don't add this to your users .profile or you get an error on a graphical boot)

source: Resize font on boot message screen and console

rubo77's user avatar

I was able to increase the console resolution on an Ubuntu server 20.04.2 VM by editing /etc/default/grub and setting GRUB_GFXMODE to the desired resolution (in my case, setting GRUB_GFXMODE=1152x864 ), and then by running sudo update-grub2 . I was able to find the available resolution modes by running sudo hwinfo --framebuffer . I'm using grub 2.04 .

user2279952's user avatar

The following worked for me on Debian Stretch 4.9.51-1. No GUI, only console mode:

Edit /etc/default/grub and add the following line

For a list of vga= codes see http://pierre.baudu.in/other/grub.vga.modes.html

The nomodeset prevents the resolution from changing again after grub initializes [thanks How do I increase console-mode resolution? ]

EDIT: As mentioned by @Videonauth : Afterwards do: sudo update-grub

Otti's user avatar

  • To make changes in /etc/default/grub is not enough, you as well need to run afterwards sudo update-grub to make it happen –  Videonauth Oct 26, 2017 at 15:51

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Screen resolution Utility task fails with error #17764

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chilakamarthi commented Feb 14, 2023

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How to invoke Hyper-V Enhanced Session screen resolution prompt?

When using client Hyper-V in Windows 10, the first time you switch on Enhanced Session for VM it prompts you to select resolution, then remembers your selection and never prompts again it seems. Where does resolution setting get stored, or how can I force this screen resolution prompt again to change the selected resolution?

  • windows-10-v1607

Blackwood's user avatar

4 Answers 4

You can use cmd.exe and type:

VMConnect.exe <ServerName> <VMName> /edit

P.S.: You can also share local hard drive (Show Options ->tab Local Resources->Local devices and resources->More) as on normal windows remote desktop session :-)

You may need to have the VM started for this to work. You may need to run this from an admin prompt if on localhost.

Julian Knight's user avatar

  • 3 Not sure why it has been downvoted, but I just tested and "VMConnect.exe <ServerName> <VMName> /edit" indeed does the trick - I have my screen resolution prompt :) Thanks for your response. –  Mike Mar 3, 2017 at 6:59
  • I think this required 2012 or later? Doesn't seem to work on 2008R2. –  Shiv Jun 4, 2018 at 21:38
  • 9 Unfortunately, my proposed edit to the above was rejected by the community. However, this answer is incomplete and not useful without the additional information that using the /edit often will not work until the VM is already running. So, if you can't get the above to work, start the VM first in the Hyper-V Manager without connecting to it, then run the VMConnect.exe command line with the /edit option. –  Peter Duniho Jul 31, 2018 at 16:14
  • It didn't work when I try to connect to Windows 7 Enterprise. –  Dush Mar 4, 2019 at 23:38
  • If you are on Powershell and want to copy and paste the name of your vm you can use this command "Get-VM". This will print out every VM you have on your local machine. –  Frank Fu Sep 15, 2020 at 18:23

There's a much easier way - after lots of research!

Close the VM client down

Hyper-V Manager Setting

Under Server -> Enhanced Session Mode Policy, simply:

  • Uncheck Allow Enhanced Session mode
  • Re-check Allow Enhanced Session Mode (this will reset).
  • Apply again

Enhance Session Mode

  • Now Start the VM in question but don't connect yet.

Start the VM

  • Wait for the VM to start then right-click the VM in the console
  • You should see "Edit Session Settings" option
  • Click this and the original dialogue will appear again.

Ng Sek Long's user avatar

  • 1 This method also didn't show "Edit Session Settings" when connecting to Windows 7 Enterprise. But it worked for Windows 10 –  Dush Mar 4, 2019 at 23:40
  • 3 "Edit session settings" option doesn't appear for me because vmconnect does not list the virtual machine(s). This is due to user permissions for localhost. I'm on a domain controlled PC. –  Nobody Jul 26, 2019 at 12:17
  • 2 Good job finding a deeply buried configuration for an otherwise simple setting. –  InteXX Nov 29, 2019 at 10:08
  • It didn't work for me, an even better solution is to change resolution settings in guest OS, ie. right click desktop and display settings. and window will auto resize! –  metablaster Feb 13, 2020 at 19:58
  • 2 Didn't work for me. Followed instructions up until the 'You should see "Edit Session Settings" option' step, at which point I did not see that option. –  glenviewjeff Feb 3, 2023 at 14:35

All I do is close the window and reconnect, and it prompts me for the Display configuration settings again (Windows 10 Hyper-V Manager)

Shane Grant's user avatar

  • 4 The problem is if "save for future sessions" is checked it's impossible to get these options back via the GUI –  kcdwayne Oct 3, 2021 at 20:15

Enhanced Session configuration/settings files:

  • The configuration files for each VM's enhanced session settings can be found in %APPDATA%\Microsoft\Windows\Hyper-V\Client\1.0
  • The file naming scheme is vmconnect.rdp.<VMGUID>.config
  • Each .config file contains a setting called "SaveButtonChecked" which, if changed to False , will force the connection settings dialog to open the next time a connection is made to that VM
  • Deleting a VM's .config file in this directory will also force the connection settings dialog to open

Open the connection settings dialog using Hyper-V Manager:

When a VM is running and Enhanced RDP Sessions can be established, Edit Session Settings... will appear in the Action Pane (right-hand side)

Edit Session Settings...

Open the connection settings dialog using vmconnect.exe

  • vmconnect.exe "VMServerName" "VMName" -G "VMGUID" -C 0 /edit
  • vmconnect.exe "VMServerName" "Server1" /edit will always open the first instance of Server1 (and will never open the second instance) -- which is why using the the -G "VMGUID" argument (either by itself or together with "VMName" ) is beneficial.
  • If opening multiple vmconnect.exe instances, incrementing the -C argument by 1 each time it is run will stagger the window positions, making each vmconnect.exe window easier to see.

To Find out if a VM can establish an enhanced RDP session:

  • (Get-VMHost).EnableEnhancedSessionMode will tell you if Enhanced Session Mode is enabled on the VM server

The EnhancedSessionModeState property returns a uint16 value:

Paul π's user avatar

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task set console window screen resolution

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COMMENTS

  1. Console screen resolution not changing, and appear...

    01-10-2017 11:00 AM I too was having the same issue. Try changing your "Video Card" to "Auto-detect settings" in the "Edit Settings" menu. The virtual machine will have to be powered down. Steve (Seattle) Reply 7 Kudos Dudleydoggg Contributor 08-25-2018 06:57 AM Thank you also that was the problem Many thanks Vmware Trials Are the Bomb Reply

  2. Any way of changing Windows screen resolution via command line?

    Change screen resolution of all monitors to 800x600px. ChangeScreenResolution.exe /w=800 /h=600. Change screen resolution of all monitors to 800x600px with refresh rate of 60Hz and 32bit color depth. ChangeScreenResolution.exe /w=800 /h=600 /f=60 /b=32. Set color depth of display with index 1 to 16bit.

  3. How to change Display Resolution using CMD or Script in Windows

    The procedure to change the Display Resolution in Windows 11 is as follows: Right-click on the Start button and select Settings . In the Settings window, select System on the list on the left-hand ...

  4. How to set display resolution via PowerShell on Win10 Pro

    1 Set-DisplayResolution is a commandlet from the ServerCore PowerShell module and seems not to be available on Windows 10. - CodeFox Dec 8, 2020 at 17:25 1 Can confirm what @CodeFox said. Running Set-DisplayResolution -Width 1024 -Height 768 on Windows Server 2019 worked out of the box. - Jaakko Jan 3, 2021 at 9:21 Add a comment 4 Answers

  5. Tricks to Overcome VM Screen Resolution Issues

    Click Show Options. Select the D isplay tab. Move the Display Configuration slide bar to your preferred resolution. Click Connect. You can configure the display resolution through the RDP client. As you can see, setting the display resolution is normally a simple and straightforward process. Problems can arise sometimes though.

  6. How to get the current screen resolution on windows via command line?

    Example: I'm using a 4k monitor, but currently set to display only at 1920x1080. When I run the command above, I get: ScreenHeight ScreenWidth 2160 3840 How do I get the current screen resolution on windows via command line? command-line display resolution Share Improve this question Follow edited Nov 10, 2020 at 21:37 asked May 14, 2019 at 23:43

  7. Increasing virtual machine display resolution to a custom resolution

    To set the virtual machine display resolution to 3280 x 2048: VMwareResolutionSet.exe 0 1 , 0 0 3280 2048 To set a virtual machine with two monitors side-by-side, one at 1920x1200 and one at 1600x1200: VMwareResolutionSet.exe 0 2 , 0 0 1920 1200 , 1920 0 1600 1200 Related Information Adding video resolution modes to Windows guest operating systems

  8. Screen resolution of VM while running in console mode

    Connect to the machine in mstsc and the this bat file : SwitchScreenResolution.bat. TSCON 2 /Dest:Console --Replace 2 with the good Id Session (see in taskManager / Users Tab / ID value) timeout 10 QRes.exe /x 1920 /y 1200 -- Replace with the compatible resolution (you can see all compatible resolution with VNC) Share. Improve this answer.

  9. Set VMware Remote Console Display Resolution Preferences

    Updated on 12/08/2020 You can configure the display resolution preferences that determine how a virtual machine is displayed only after resizing the window in VMware Remote Console. Prerequisites Change the display resolution by resizing the window. This action can work if VMware Tools is installed and is up to date in the virtual machine.

  10. How to change screen resolution with command on Windows 10

    Right-click the QRes.zip file and select the Extract All button. Click the Extract button. Type CMD and press Enter in add "QRes" folder address bar to open Command Prompt in the location. Type the following command to change the Windows 10 screen resolution and press Enter: QRes.exe /x:1680 /y:1050. In the command, change the path for the ...

  11. SetResolution: Setting Windows Display Resolution from the Terminal

    SetResolution: Setting Windows Display Resolution from the Terminal December 06, 2022 • from Maui, Hawaii Download SetResolution from GitHub I recently started using a desktop machine with a single attached 4k monitor after years of running on laptops with at least a dual screen setup.

  12. VM Console Display Resolution Change

    When opening or resizing VMRC of any versions or Web Console of Web Client 6.5, the screen resolution of Windows Guest OS changes to fit the window size of the client if the guest OS is Windows. This results in changing the screen resolution of the guest. The fix is not so good. You need to modify the vmx file of the VM when it is powered off.

  13. How to adjust virtual machine display resolution to adapt to full

    Within your powershell console use the following: PowerShell. Copy. Set-VMVideo -VMName "Name of VM in Manager" -HorizontalResolution 1920 -VerticalResolution 1080 -ResolutionType Single. You can change the resolution to your needs. The resolutiontype as single makes this the only resolution available for the VM.

  14. esxi 6.5 how to turn off autofit window / automatic display resolution

    after I installed VMware Tools on virtual machine its resolution adjusts to the console window size automatically. It is not what I want - I want that the resolution of my virtual machine stays the same. ... to set the virtual machine display resolution to 3280 x 2048: VMwareResolutionSet.exe 0 1 , 0 0 3280 2048 The spaces around the comma seem ...

  15. tty

    Finally, locate the line that says set gfxmode=${GRUB_GFXMODE} and add a line for payload below it. It should look like this: set gfxmode=${GRUB_GFXMODE} set gfxpayload=${GRUB_GFXPAYLOAD} Save and exit. Still as root, refresh grub with. update-grub2 Reboot, and both the grub menu and the console should have nicer resolutions. Finished!

  16. Screen resolution Utility task fails with error #17764

    It may not be possible to change the screen resolution. Please ensure that agent is running with autologon and disconnect any remote desktop sessions. 2023-02-09T17:06:37.3574008Z ##[debug]Processed: ##vso[task.logissue type=warning]The current user session is not a console session. It may not be possible to change the screen resolution.

  17. Change the default resolution of Remote Desktop Connection (mstsc)

    Open regedit and navigate to the registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE → SOFTWARE → Microsoft → Windows → CurrentVersion → SideBySide. Right-click, select NEW → DWORD (32 bit) Value. Type PreferExternalManifest, and then press Enter. Right-click PreferExternalManifest, and then click Modify.

  18. Increase the screen resolution on Test Agent

    We call this script C:\Scripts\Resolution.RDP.Remoting.exe (see example below) in a VS building block with the arguments "C:\Scripts\$ (Chrome-node).rdp" 1600 1200. Where the *.rdp file for each machine was stored (upfront) in this folder and 1600 1200 is the resolution we want to set. Here is the code for the executable on github.

  19. How to get the size of the windows console form?

    Using the windows API it should be easy to get the size and screen position of a window. I think, the difficult task will be to find the window that runs the console within. ... All answers return either number of characters either the full screen resolution. The Windows console is historically an emulation of the DOS shell. ... 99x58 Console ...

  20. Task scheduler / Resolution change event

    The events: DisplaySettingsChanged and DisplaySettingsChanging. DisplaySettingsChanged is raised after the screen resolution has been changed in the Control Panel utility or via some other software. DisplaySettingsChanging runs slightly earlier, as the display details are being modified. The last two links help us how to monitor these events.

  21. windows 10

    Change the Hyper-V Manager settings (right-hand window of the Hyper-V console) Re-check Allow Enhanced Session Mode (this will reset). Now Start the VM in question but don't connect yet. Wait for the VM to start then right-click the VM in the console. Click this and the original dialogue will appear again. Done.