Facebook

262-456-2384

10 Literacy Activities for 3-Year-Olds

As your child enters preschool, they will be exposed to a new world of learning. And while some kids may take to reading and writing like a duck to water, others may need a little more encouragement. This is where literacy activities come in! Literacy activities are a great way to help your little one improve their abilities to read, write and understand language. They also help develop critical literacy skills, such as phonemic awareness, letter recognition, and early reading and writing. If your little one is starting to show an interest in literacy but could use a helping hand, here are ten fun literacy activities for 3-year-olds.

Start with the basics

Literacy activities for 3-year-olds involve plenty of hands-on learning. One way to get started is to focus on the basics. Have your child identify letters, sounds, and words. You can do this by reading children's books together, writing out simple sentences, or playing word games. You can also try making homemade literacy materials, such as flashcards or literacy worksheets.

Encourage a love of reading

One of the best ways to encourage literacy development is to foster a love of reading in your child. Make reading time fun by choosing engaging books, using silly voices, and making it a memorable bonding experience. You can also try adding in a few literacy activities, such as looking for words that start with the same sound or finding hidden objects in the illustrations.

Get creative with writing

Writing doesn't have to be all about pencils and paper! Writing activities offer plenty of ways to get your child interested in literacy. You can try finger painting with washable paint, making homemade stamps, or using magnetic letters to spell words. Just get creative and have fun!

Make it musical

Songs and rhymes are an excellent way to help your child learn literacy skills. Research has shown that they can improve phonemic awareness, memory, and vocabulary. So make literacy time extra fun by singing songs and reciting nursery rhymes together. You can also try making up your own songs or adding literacy-themed lyrics to familiar tunes.

Play literacy games

Games are a great way to sneak in some extra learning. And when it comes to literacy activities for 3-year-olds, there are plenty of fun options to choose from. You can try literacy-themed memory games, matching games, or even simple board games. Just make sure to choose games that are age-appropriate and focus on the literacy skills you want your child to work on.

Get movin' and groovin'

Movement is a great way to help kids learn and retain information. So get up and move when you're doing literacy activities with your child. You can try clapping out syllables, acting out stories, or even dancing along to literacy-themed songs. Be sure to keep things fun and interactive!

Make it tactile

For some kids, learning is all about touching and feeling. If this sounds like your child, try incorporating some tactile literacy activities into your routine. You can try using Play-Doh to form letters, making homemade books out of construction paper or using shaving cream to write words on a mirror. Feel free to get creative and let your child's senses guide you!

Use technology

Technology can be a great tool for literacy learning. There are tons of literacy apps, websites and games available to help kids practice their skills. You can also find e-books, online stories, and educational videos to watch together. Remember to choose age-appropriate resources that are aligned with your child's literacy goals.

Get outdoors

There's no need to confine literacy learning to the indoors! There are plenty of literacy activities you can do outside. You can try finding shapes in the clouds, writing with sticks in the sand, or looking for words on signs and billboards. Just get creative and explore your surroundings!

Above all, remember to have fun when doing literacy activities with your child. If it starts to feel like a chore, your child will likely lose interest. So keep things lighthearted and make literacy time a memorable bonding experience for the two of you.

By incorporating just a few of these activities into your daily routine, you'll be giving your child a head start on their literacy journey – and having lots of fun along the way too!

At Mrs. Myers' Learning Lab , we specialize in fun, interactive classes for developing readers. Our engaging process leads to students gaining self-confidence, interpersonal skills, and a love for learning that extends far beyond the classroom. Visit us to learn more!

Literacy Activities for 3-Year-Olds

Go back to Newsfeed

Powered by IM

  • Pregnancy Weeks
  • Nursery Design
  • Toddler Sleep
  • White Noise

12 Toddler Literacy Activities for Budding Bookworms

Happiest Baby Staff

Dr. Seuss once said, “The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more you learn, the more places you’ll go.” Reading is power and kids can start learning literacy skills the day they are born simply by being read to. Once your baby becomes a big toddler and even bigger preschooler, though, reading can become something even more transformative. Here are a few literacy activities for toddlers that help little bookworms build skills…as well as a lifelong love for the written word. 

Phonics Basket Literacy Activity for Toddlers

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Image & activity via The Imagination Tree

Kids can start to learn that each letter has its own sound with this simple sorting game. Create baskets for a few letters and then have your child sort the corresponding household items or toys.

Rainbow Salt Writing Literacy Activity for Toddlers

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Image & activity via Raising Dragons

Before your kiddo puts pen to paper, have them put fingertips to sand! Salt writing is a great literacy activity for toddlers that will get your budding author comfortable with writing shapes, then letters, and eventually words. They can start with fingers and then graduate to brushes and sticks as they prepare to hold a pencil.

Sight Word Lego Literacy Activity for Preschoolers

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Image & activity via The Printable Princess

Grab some old building blocks and a permanent marker and voila! You’ve created a sight word game that will give your kids the chance to flex their new reading skills. Challenge your kids by giving them a new word to practice every day.

Feed the Dog Literacy Activity for Kids

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Image & activity via Totschooling

Kids will love feeding the dog in this sight word game that asks tykes to read words out loud. Challenge them by adding in some big words…or even their names! 

Toss the Balloon Sight Word Literacy Activity for Kids

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Image & activity via Gift of Curiosity

For kids with the wiggles, this sight word literacy activity is a perfect way to keep littles learning and moving all at the same time.

Alphabet Swat Literacy Activity for Toddlers

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Image & activity via Kindergarten Connection

Kids will get a kick out of this hilarious literacy activity for toddlers that asks them to use a fly swatter to “catch” letters. When reading games are fun, kids will learn that reading is a worthy activity to pursue. The original version lets kids swat letters all over the house, but for more quiet play, try the tabletop version .

Magic Letters Literacy Activity for Toddlers

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Image & activity via Mas & Pas  

Blend art and letters with this fun literacy activity for toddlers. Kids can really sit with a letter and learn all about it while they try their hand at painting in this magical letter art game. 

Goldfish Cracker Tracing Literacy Activity for Toddlers

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Kids can get a chance to learn how to write their letters with this fun literacy activity that combines a lesson with snack time.

Letter Animal Literacy Activity for Toddlers

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Image & activity via Learn, Create, Love  

Here’s a fun literacy activity for toddlers that teaches the letters of the alphabet…and sparks creativity! Each letter becomes an animal that your child can color and cut out then display on the fridge. These printables are open-ended enough to let kids explore…but also give busy parents a tangible tool to use.

Hop-to-It Literacy Activity for Toddlers

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Image & activity via 123 Homeschool 4 Me

This action-packed literacy activity for toddlers invites kids to help a frog jump to the right lily pad by matching lowercase to uppercase letters.  

Alphabet Scavenger Hunt Literacy Activity for Toddlers

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Image & activity via Play Party Plan

Turn learning the alphabet into a fun scavenger hunt for household objects. Make a big list of items that each start with each letter from the alphabet and have your kiddo race around the house to find them all.

Alphabet Poem Literacy Activity for Preschoolers

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Image & activity via Krazy for Kindyland

Silly poems are fun for tots to hear and recite out loud…and they’re a fab way to start learning letter recognition and letter sounds. Find a few goofy alphabet inspired poems and turn your living room into a slam poetry party.

More Toddler Activities:

  • Math Activities for Toddlers
  • Science Activities for Toddlers
  • Indoor Toddler Activities
  • Toddler Art Projects
  • Educational Apps for Toddlers

View more posts tagged, education & learning

Have questions about a Happiest Baby product? Our consultants would be happy to help! Submit your questions here.

Disclaimer: The information on our site is NOT medical advice for any specific person or condition. It is only meant as general information. If you have any medical questions and concerns about your child or yourself, please contact your health provider.

You may also like

In the 48 contiguous United States, customers will be charged $59.50 + tax for the shipment of SNOO back to Happiest Baby. Added charges will apply for shipping to and from Alaska and Hawaii.

* An additional $185 shipping fee will be applied to SNOO purchases sent to Hawaii and Alaska.

literacy activity for 3 year olds

  • Book Lists by Age
  • Book Lists by Category
  • Reading Resources
  • Language & Speech
  • Raise a Reader Blog
  • Back to School
  • Success Guides by Grade
  • Homework Help
  • Social & Emotional Learning
  • Activities for Kids

Engaging Reading Activities for Preschoolers and Kindergarteners

Introduce your child to a world of letters and words with these activities..

Somewhere between their infant years and first day of school, your child learns the fundamentals of language. They do this by first identifying the sounds that words make (called phonemic awareness) and then corresponding letters these sounds represent (phonological awareness, or phonics). These pre-reading skills are the start of your child’s path to literacy. 

At the same time, your child is coming into their own, eager to express their creativity and share their personality with others. Books are the perfect solution for honing your child’s skills while introducing them to relatable characters they’ll love.

These five playful reading activities for ages 3-5 make the learning process fun for both you and your little one.  

1. Fun With Letters

Children enjoy copying words out onto paper. Write your child’s name and have them copy it with alphabet stamps, stickers, or magnets. Encourage them to “write” using the letters. Your child will write letters backwards, spell randomly, and may hold their writing implement strangely — it’s all OK at this age, when a child is eager to communicate via writing of any kind. The next time you are out in the park or at the beach, use your surroundings to play with letters. Take turns writing letters in the dirt, sand, or snow. (Save Scholastic Early Learners: Write and Wipe ABC 123 for rainy days.)

2. What Word Starts With…?

The letter-sound connection is one of the first steps to reading. Play a guessing game about your child’s favorite words. What letter does “p-p-p-pirate” start with? How about “M-m-mommy”?

Once your child guesses the letter correctly, see how many words you can come up with together that start with the same letter. Write the letters and words inside Peppa Pig: Wipe-Clean First Letters and Words , which offers extra support for making letter-sound associations.

3. Your Child the Author

Three-year-olds can be chatty; by age 4, it can be hard to get a word in edgewise. Take advantage of your child’s interest in talking by writing a book together. 

Start out with something simple, like describing a fun day at the park or visiting friends. Then, staple a few pieces of paper together and write out one or two of your child’s sentences on each page. Let them illustrate the book as you go along, and read it together when it’s complete.

If your little one needs a boost of creativity or inspiration, turn to Little Skill Seekers: 1-2-3 Draw! This fun workbook gives step-by-step instructions for drawing familiar animals and objects, which your child can color in afterward. In addition to sparking the imagination, these activities help sharpen hand-eye coordination and fine-motor skills.

4. A Different Way to Read

Reading aloud to your child is a must, but what’s even better is something called “dialogic” reading. That’s when you ask your child to participate in the story.

Before turning the page, ask your child what they think will happen next. You can also ask your child another way the book could have ended or how they would have liked it to end. For example, in the classic picture book  Corduroy , what would have happened if Lisa hadn’t returned to the toy store to bring Corduroy home?

5. Just the Facts

Your child is becoming more curious about the world around them. Gauge their interests and steer them to nonfiction books related to their favorite topics. There are books a-plenty for young readers in this age bracket that tackle popular subjects — cars, dinosaurs, the ocean, space — in informative detail but with eye-popping photos and interactive elements. Be an Expert!: Ocean Animals is but one example, featuring simple sentences and sight words that support reading skills.

Encourage a love of reading with help from our guide, which includes book recommendations by interest, tips for getting your child to read for fun, and much more. Plus, take a look at reading activities for 6- and 7-year-olds . 

Shop popular titles and learning kits for children ages 3 to 5 below. You can find all books and activities at  The Scholastic Store .

For more quick tips and book recommendations, sign up for our Scholastic Parents newsletter!

You'll also get 10% off your first order at the Scholastic Store Online.

Engaging Literacy Activities for Preschoolers

  • brightwheel

Engaging Literacy Activities for Preschoolers

Literacy skills are the foundation of all learning and serve as a pillar for cognitive, social-emotional, and physical development. Children first acquire basic literacy skills at home and then build on them when they start early childhood education. 

Literacy skills enable smooth communication between children and the people around them. Preschoolers who can read and write are typically good problem solvers, are independent-minded, and have a strong command of language.

Both families and teachers play a significant role in promoting literacy and language development for preschoolers. Songs and rhymes, creating with playdough, and reading aloud are some fun and engaging literacy activities for preschoolers. We cover more details about literacy activities for preschoolers in this guide!

Preschoolers engaged in literacy activities

What are early literacy skills for preschoolers? 

Early literacy skills are the skills preschoolers need to read, comprehend, write, listen, and speak. There are three main components that make up early literacy skills:

  • Oral language development includes listening comprehension, verbal expression, and vocabulary development skills. 
  • Understanding the alphabetic code includes phonological awareness and knowledge of the alphabet.
  • Print knowledge and use includes awareness and an understanding of print concepts such as in what direction to read a book, and book orientation.

Preschoolers need to focus on strengthening certain skills such as vocabulary, letter knowledge and phonological awareness to become successful readers, listeners, speakers, and writers. Below, we elaborate on these skills.

1. Vocabulary

Having an understanding of vocabulary means preschoolers can understand words used to communicate successfully. Between the ages of 3 and 5, children rapidly begin to recognize new words . 

Children must acquire different types of vocabulary for listening, speaking, reading, and writing by the time they start school. 

  • Listening vocabulary means words we need to know to understand what we hear.
  • Speaking vocabulary means words we use when speaking.
  • Writing vocabulary means words we use when writing.
  • Reading vocabulary means words we need to know to comprehend what we read.

2. Print motivation

Print motivation refers to the interest in and enjoyment of books. Preschoolers with print motivation love being read to, playing with books, and attempting to read aloud. Families and teachers can support print motivation by making interesting and exciting children's books available to their preschoolers.

3. Print awareness

Print awareness refers to understanding the unique organization of print. It involves knowing how to position a book when reading and learning the recommended reading direction. For example, English should be read from left to right and from top to bottom.

4. Narrative skills

Narrative skills are the ability to understand and tell stories and to describe objects and events. These skills are critical for developing reading and comprehension skills. When a preschooler describes what happened on a family trip to visit grandma, the child is using narrative skills.

5. Letter recognition

Letter recognition is a crucial literacy skill that involves identifying and distinguishing letters of the alphabet. This skill is a fundamental aspect of reading, as it forms the basis for decoding and recognizing printed words. 

6. Letter knowledge

Letter knowledge involves understanding the different attributes of letters. This includes recognizing the sound associated with each letter and the different ways it can be written, such as uppercase and lowercase forms. While letter recognition focuses on visual identification, letter knowledge encompasses a broader understanding of letters and their functions in language. Developing both skills is essential for early literacy success, as they work together to build a foundation for reading and writing proficiency.

7. Phonological awareness

Phonological awareness is the ability to hear and manipulate sounds within words. It involves knowing that constituent sounds make up words. Word constituents can be identified by syllables, phonemes, onsets, and rhymes. Phonological awareness establishes the foundation for decoding and reading text.

What are the milestones for early literacy skills in preschool?

Most children are reading by age 7 . However, literacy skills development starts during infancy and develops further during preschool. 

Preschool early literacy skills milestones are the framework for assessing whether a child is developing accordingly. Below, we look at the milestones for early literacy skills in preschool.

3 to 4 years old

  • Turns book pages one at a time, from left to right
  • Sits uninterrupted for longer stories
  • Recites complete phrases
  • Displays basic letter recognition
  • Shows rhyme detection
  • Reads to doll toys when playing
  • Retells familiar stories
  • Can sing alphabet songs
  • Recognizes the first letter in their name
  • Knows that writing is different from drawing

4 to 5 years old

  • Copies letters and numbers
  • Sits uninterrupted for even longer stories
  • Identifies numbers and letters
  • Can narrate familiar stories
  • Can create rhymes
  • Knows letter names and different sounds
  • Is print aware—knows that print is read from left to right and top to bottom

Why are early literacy skills important to develop in early childhood?

Adequate early literacy preparation at the preschool level supports children on a path for lifelong success.

Overall, early literacy is the foundation for all learning. Not only do these skills set children up to be successful readers and writers, but they also help improve language and communication skills, boost self-confidence and independence, and promote fine motor skills development. Below, we go into more depth on some of the benefits of developing early literacy skills at a young age.

Establishes a strong foundation for all learning

High-quality literacy education at preschool sets a precedent for successful academic and extracurricular pursuits. 90% of brain growth happens by age 5. If all children have access to quality early education programs that promote early literacy skills during this critical development stage, they are more likely to go on to graduate from high school and are prepared for later success in school and in life. 

Aids language development 

Language development starts with sounds and gestures, and then words and sentences. Children need to acquire vocabulary to support language skills development. Things like exposing children to books and reading to them, help them acquire new vocabulary daily, adding to their vocabulary repertoire for language skills development. Besides vocabulary acquisition, early literacy skills also improve children’s grammar, writing, and spelling skills.

Boosts self-confidence and promotes independence

As children begin to master how to read and write, their self-confidence increases as they trust their ability to learn new things. These skills also foster independence as children are able to read and comprehend written instructions and can figure out new words on their own.

Improves communication skills

Literacy skills facilitate smooth communication between children and their peers, teachers, and families. Learning literary skills exposes children to new everyday vocabulary for language skills development, making it easier to express themselves.

Promotes fine motor skills development 

Fine motor skills involve using the small muscles that control the hand, fingers, and thumb and support activities like feeding, buttoning, and zipping. Writing is one of the best ways to promote fine motor skills development, since it uses the small muscles of the hand.

How to approach teaching literacy skills to preschoolers

Teaching preschoolers literacy skills should be fun and engaging. Below are some easy strategies to consider. You can also incorporate these strategies in your preschool literacy lesson plans.

Grab children’s attention

Reading aloud and telling stories are proven strategies for teaching literacy skills. But these strategies work only when children are attentive. So, you want to first capture their interest before you start to read or tell a story.

One way to gain children’s attention is by using a simple phrase or rhyming sentence that signals to children it’s time to listen and start a new activity. A phrase such as “Hocus pocus, everybody focus”, is one way to bring children’s focus back to the task at hand.

Introduce new vocabulary during story time

Story and reading times are excellent opportunities for teaching new vocabulary. The best practice is to highlight new words and define them before starting the story session. Importantly, you should consider words critical to understanding the story. You can also incorporate body language, like facial expressions, to make it more engaging.

Adapt the “see-show-say” strategy

The “see-show-say” strategy promotes receptive language skill development. You can use this idea when reading aloud in the classroom or at home. Here’s how the strategy works:

  • See : The teacher points to objects, pictures, letters, and numbers in a book or other study materials. This helps children to familiarize themselves with these specific objects.
  • Show : The teacher asks the children to identify different objects, pictures, letters, and numbers.
  • Say : The teacher asks the children to say the word or repeat it after them.

Highlight preschoolers' favorite books

Reading preschoolers' favorite books supports print motivation and is a great way to engage them during story time. In addition, you can encourage your class to talk about their favorite books by posting photos of their favorite characters on classroom walls. 

Establish a read-aloud routine

Creating a reading routine with your children will offer a sense of predictability and stability each day. For example, in the classroom you can establish reading one book during story time each morning and before the end of the day. At home, families can add reading to their bedtime routine. Being consistent will help make reading part of your everyday routine to promote literacy skills. 

What are some engaging activities for building early literacy skills in preschoolers?

While it’s true literacy skills don’t develop overnight, there are many engaging activities you can use to promote these skills. Below are some home- and classroom-based fun activities to consider.

1. Alphabet pillow jumping

This alphabet pillow jump activity is great for keeping children active at home and teaching them literacy skills simultaneously. You'll need paper plates, packing tape, a pen, and pillows. Write a letter on each paper plate and stick a plate on each pillow.

Spread the pillows throughout the room and have the children jump on them. As they jump on each pillow, ask them to say the letter and its sound.

2. Magic letter painting

You’ll need some note cards, white wax crayons, watercolor paints, and paintbrushes. Have the children write different letters on the note cards using white crayons and then use the paintbrush to paint over the cards. Watch their facial expressions as the magic letter appears on each card. 

3. Songs and rhymes

Singing and reciting rhymes is an excellent way to learn new vocabulary and develop linguistic abilities. You should have a variety of preschool songs and rhymes for your sessions, keeping them in rotation. Children love repetition, which keeps them engaged and interested in the songs and rhymes.

4. Playdough

Creating with playdough is a great sensory play activity that supports fine motor development. Playdough strengthens children's hand muscles as they use them to mold, roll, and pat clay. Building strong hand muscles is key, since children use them to hold pencils when writing. 

5. Scribbling

Scribbling can be done at home or school and is an excellent way to promote pre-writing skills. You need to have crayons or pencils and pieces of paper for this exercise. Teach the children how to hold a crayon or pencil and show them how to scribble.

6. Drawing shapes

Drawing skills establish the foundation for writing letters and numbers. Activities that focus on drawing different shapes help with children’s pencil grip and coordination. Simple shapes they can practice with include circles, squares, triangles, and rectangles.

Developing literacy skills FAQs

What are the characteristics of an effective literacy program.

While many literacy programs exist, choosing an effective program for preschoolers shouldn't be a hurdle. An effective literacy program should focus on phonemic awareness, phonological awareness, letter recognition, vocabulary, comprehension, verbal expression, and print awareness.

What is pre-reading for preschoolers?

Pre-reading involves activities teachers and families can use to prepare preschoolers for literacy reading skills. Reading aloud, recreating a picture book, creating stories from pictures, and labeling everyday items are excellent pre-reading activities for preschoolers.

What are examples of literacy activities?

Letter recognition activities, drawing shapes, scribbling, singing songs, and reading books are great examples of children's literacy activities. You can do any of the activities with children at home or school.

What is literacy in early childhood?

Literacy in early childhood means laying the foundation for all learning. It involves introducing children to basic reading and writing skills concepts before they learn more advanced skills later on.

A child’s cognitive, physical, and social-emotional development all depend on literacy skills development. Teachers and families can promote literacy skills by incorporating reading and literacy activities into their everyday routines and encouraging a love of reading early on.

Calendar Template for Early Education Programs

A template for creating a school year calendar for families.

Get the guide

Subscribe to the brightwheel blog

Upgrade to Experience Curriculum, now in brightwheel!

Recent Posts

  • Navigating Childcare Grants and Other Funding Resources in Oregon May 24, 2024
  • Implementing the Reggio Emilia Approach to Enhance Learning in Early Childhood May 24, 2024
  • Navigating Childcare Grants and Other Funding Resources in Oklahoma May 23, 2024
  • An Introduction to Co-Teaching Models in Early Childhood Education May 22, 2024
  • Project-Based Learning (PBL) in Preschools May 21, 2024

Posts by Tag

  • Running a business (201)
  • Child development (164)
  • Curriculum (83)
  • Financial health (53)
  • Staff development (47)
  • Family engagement (40)
  • Small business funding (40)
  • COVID-19 (30)
  • Technology (27)
  • Family communications (15)
  • Staff retention (15)
  • ECE career growth (13)
  • For Parents (10)
  • Diversity and inclusion (9)
  • Enrollment (7)
  • Staff appreciation (7)
  • Marketing (6)
  • Public policy (6)
  • Staff hiring (5)
  • ECE current events (4)
  • Family retention (4)
  • Salary guides (4)
  • Leadership (2)
  • Skip to content
  • Skip to navigation

About literacy activities

Literacy development is important for your child’s overall development . That’s because literacy is the foundation for doing well at school, socialising with others, problem-solving, making decisions, becoming independent, managing money and working.

Talking, singing, playing sound and word games, reading, writing and drawing with your child are great ways to develop your child’s literacy.

The great news is that everyday activities , like family meals, bath time or shopping, are all fun opportunities for literacy development.

The key is to use these opportunities to help your child learn. It can be as simple as writing a shopping list together, playing a rhyming game or reading a story before bed.

It’s never too early to do literacy activities with your child. Even babies enjoy listening to stories and being part of conversations.

Babies, toddlers and preschoolers: literacy activities

Talking and singing activities Talking and singing with young children helps them to develop listening and speaking skills.

Here are ideas to get you started:

  • Use rhyme whenever you can. Try phrases like ‘snug as a bug in a rug’, or make up rhymes about things you’re doing, like ‘putting fish in the cat’s dish’.
  • Sing nursery rhymes with your child. Nursery rhymes teach your child language, rhyme, repetition and rhythm. You could try ‘Baa baa black sheep’, ‘Miss Polly had a dolly’ or the ‘Alphabet song’.
  • Repeat sounds your baby makes when you don’t know what they’re trying to say. But respond with real words when you do know. For example, if your baby says ‘wa wa’ while pointing to their bottle, you could say ‘You want water’.
  • Make up sounds and see whether your child can copy them. For example, ‘Cows say moo. Can you say moo?’
  • At mealtimes, talk about the food you’re preparing, what you’re doing to it, how it tastes and what it looks like.
  • Talk about objects outside the house – for example, the rustling of leaves, or the sounds of the birds or traffic. Ask your child to make the sounds for wind, rain, water, airplanes, trains and cars.
  • Play games like ‘I spy’ using colours. This can be fun, especially for preschoolers. For example, ‘I spy with my little eye, something that’s green. What’s something green I might be looking at?’

If you can’t remember the words, tune or actions to a nursery rhyme, you could spark your memory with our Baby Karaoke .

Reading and book-based activities Reading with children develops their vocabulary, ability to listen and understand, and ability to connect sounds and words.

Your child might like these activities:

  • Try books with rhyme, rhythm and repetition. Many young children enjoy books like Ten little fingers and ten little toes by Mem Fox, Hairy Maclary by Linley Dodd and The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson.
  • Encourage your child to turn the pages and talk about what they see. Use your finger to guide your child’s eyes from left to right across the page as you read and point out certain words or phrases.
  • Try lift-the-flap books or touch-and-feel books. You could even make your own book with objects your child likes to look at and touch.
  • Encourage your child to take the lead with reading – for example, ‘Where do we start from?’ Every so often, stop reading and ask your child what they think will happen next.
  • Link books with real life. For example, if you’ve read a book about playing in a park, you might like to take your child to the local park and point out swings that look like the ones in the book.
  • Encourage your child to act out the story that you’re reading. For example, you can ask your child to hop like the kangaroo in the book.
  • Follow your child’s lead with reading. Encourage your child, but try not to push them. Experiment with different books to see what your child likes, and just have fun!

For a guide to books and reading activities that might suit your child, you can look at the following articles: Reading with babies from birth , Reading with toddlers: 12-18 months , Reading with toddlers: 18 months-3 years and Reading with preschoolers .

Drawing and writing literacy activities Scribbling and drawing helps young children develop fine motor skills for writing with pencils and pens later in childhood. It also helps children to understand that writing and pictures have meaning and you use them to communicate information.

Here are activities to try:

  • Encourage your child to add a scribble or drawing on birthday cards or letters.
  • Encourage your child to try some letters or write their name on their artwork. You can write letters in one colour and ask your child to trace them in another colour.
  • Help your child use playdough to make letters or numbers.
  • Give your child opportunities to use letters in different forms – on blocks, magnetic letters that stick on the fridge, and puzzle pieces.
  • Cut out or draw pictures of basic household items – chair, table, TV, wall, door and so on – and then write the items’ names on separate pieces of paper. Ask your child to match the name of the item to the picture.
  • Encourage your child to tell you about their drawings. Help your child write down the words they use.
  • Encourage your child to write letters to their family and friends. For younger children, these letters might look like scribbles. You can get your child to tell you what it says so that you can write the words underneath. Encourage friends and family to write back.

School-age children: literacy activities

Talking activities

  • Play word games. For example, ‘I spy with my little eye something beginning with F. What do you think I’m looking at that starts with the letter F?’
  • Ask your child about words that rhyme. For example, ‘What other words sound like car?’
  • Ask your child to make a sound or sound combination, and then think of words with that sound. For example, ‘What’s a funny sound? Mo? What sounds can you make with mo? Moan, mope, moat … ’.
  • Talk about the past. Ask your child to tell you something they enjoyed doing at school that week.
  • Talk about the future. Tell your child what you’re going to do on the next day or on the weekend, or ask your child to tell you what they need to do before bed.

Reading and book-based activities

  • Read stories and then talk about them. Ask, ‘What was your favourite part of the story?’ or ‘Who was your favourite character? Why?’
  • Explain the meaning of new or unusual words and concepts in books – for example, words like ‘emperor’, ‘muse’ and ‘scamper’.
  • Take turns reading. You could read half the page while your child reads the other half. You could also point out single words for your child to sound out. Start with words that are easy to sound out – for example, 2-letter and 3-letter words like ‘mat’, ‘on’ or ‘sip’.
  • Try alphabet books with younger school-age children. Ask your child to tell you words that start with the same sound as the letter you’re looking at.
  • Ask your child to make a story book and have your child draw the pictures. Your child can do this on a computer or with pens and paper. Help your child write the words or at least some of the letters in the story.
  • When you’re out and about, ask your child to pick out or sound out letters or words on billboards, shop fronts, street signs or supermarket items.

Visit the library with your child, and encourage your child to choose books to take home. These could be fiction and non-fiction books. It’s free to join and borrow books. Many libraries also have story time sessions and book clubs for children.

Drawing and writing literacy activities

  • Select a few alphabet letters and move them around to make new sounds – bat, tab, abt – and see which of them are real words. Practise sounding them out letter by letter, then saying the word – for example, ‘b-a-t makes the word bat’. Start with lower-case letters, so you don’t confuse your child with the different letter shapes for each sound.
  • Get some alphabet letter magnets and keep them on the fridge for your child to make words with. As your child learns to read, leave messages for your child and encourage your child to do the same.
  • Encourage your child to write their name and the names of other family members in greeting cards or on pictures. Once your child can use all the letters well, they’ll be ready for upper case and lower case (capitals and small letters).
  • Encourage your child to write shopping lists, restaurant menus or simple stories for pretend play.
  • Point out different types of print when you’re out and about with your child – for example, on shop signs or movie posters.
  • Ask your child to make you a book, with a word on one side of the page and a picture of that word on the other side.

Accelerate Learning

  • MISSION / VISION
  • DIVERSITY STATEMENT
  • CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
  • Kide Science
  • STEMscopes Science
  • Collaborate Science
  • STEMscopes Math
  • Math Nation
  • STEMscopes Coding
  • Mastery Coding
  • DIVE-in Engineering
  • STEMscopes Streaming
  • Tuva Data Literacy
  • NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR STEM EDUCATION
  • STEMSCOPES PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
  • RESEARCH & EFFICACY STUDIES
  • STEM EDUCATION WEBINARS
  • LEARNING EQUITY
  • DISTANCE LEARNING
  • PRODUCT UPDATES
  • LMS INTEGRATIONS
  • STEMSCOPES BLOG
  • FREE RESOURCES
  • TESTIMONIALS

20 Best Language and Literacy Activities for Preschoolers

ALI Staff | Published  February 06, 2024

Language and literacy form the bedrock of early learning, crucial for building the skills that children carry throughout their lives.

For preschoolers, whose minds are like sponges eagerly soaking up new information, this is the perfect time to nurture their understanding of language and their excitement for reading.

This phase of their development is a golden opportunity to deeply enrich their learning journey with engaging language and literacy activities.

In this article, you will learn:

  • How early literacy activities significantly shape a child’s development
  • Creative and fun ways to make learning an enjoyable experience
  • Handy tips to incorporate these activities into everyday life with ease

Diving into the realm of language and literacy opens a door to a world filled with discovery and educational adventures for both preschoolers and those guiding them.

Preschool students listening to their teacher read a story

The Importance of Early Literacy and Language Development

The early years of a child's life are critical for developing key literacy and language skills. These skills are more than just the ability to read and write; they are the building blocks for communication, critical thinking , and understanding the world.

In preschoolers, engaging in literacy activities is not just about learning the alphabet or reading words—it's about igniting a love for storytelling, expanding their vocabulary, and laying the groundwork for effective communication.

Preschool learning activities play a pivotal role in this developmental stage. They provide young minds with the opportunity to explore language in its many forms, whether through songs, stories, or interactive games.

These experiences are essential for developing a strong foundation in language and literacy, which will support their academic journey and personal growth in the years to come.

Engaging in literacy activities during these formative years helps preschoolers develop a range of skills:

  • Language Skills: Understanding and using language effectively, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing
  • Cognitive Development: Enhancing thinking, problem-solving, and understanding of concepts
  • Social Skills: Learning to communicate, share, and interact with others, fostering empathy and cooperation
  • Emotional Growth: Expressing and understanding feelings through words and stories

By integrating literacy activities into their daily lives, preschoolers are set on a path of lifelong learning and curiosity.

What is Literacy in Preschool

Before diving into strategies and activities, it's crucial to understand what literacy encompasses in a preschool setting. Literacy in preschool goes beyond just learning to read and write. It's a comprehensive concept that includes several key components:

  • Comprehension Skills: The ability to describe things and events, tell stories, and predict what will happen next in a story.
  • Early Writing Skills: Beginning to write letters, names, and simple words, and understanding that writing is a form of communication.
  • Phonemic Awareness: The ability to hear, identify, and play with individual sounds (phonemes) in spoken words.
  • Vocabulary Development: Building a bank of words that children understand and can use in conversation and comprehension.
  • Print Awareness/Alphabet Knowledge: Understanding the basics of printed language, such as recognizing letters, knowing how to hold a book, and understanding that print carries meaning.

In preschool, these elements are nurtured through a blend of structured activities and play-based learning .

The goal is to create a fun, engaging, and supportive environment where children can explore and develop these foundational skills, setting them up for future academic success and a lifelong love of reading, writing, and learning.

BRING PLAYFUL INQUIRY INTO YOUR CLASSROOM  

Top 20 Language and Literacy Activities for Preschoolers

Every preschool teacher understands the power of creative and engaging activities in nurturing literacy skills in young learners.

To spark your imagination and enrich your teaching toolkit, we've compiled a selection of tried-and-true activities. 

Read-Aloud Activities

Gathered together in a cozy corner, preschoolers delight in the world of books during read-aloud time in a small group.

This special time, filled with both enchanting stories and fascinating nonfiction, is more than just fun; it's a foundation for building robust literacy skills.

Each fiction and informational book read and reread helps children understand words, recognize sounds, and start to anticipate what comes next.

Whether exploring imaginary worlds or learning real-world facts, it's a joy to see their language skills flourish with every book shared.

This interactive and diverse reading experience is crucial in nurturing young readers and sparking a lifelong passion for all kinds of books.

1. Puppet Story Retelling

Children use puppets to retell their favorite stories. This can be done with simple hand-made puppets representing the book's characters. It's a fun way for children to practice storytelling and recall as they bring the narrative to life through puppetry.

2. Draw Your Own Ending

Invite children to draw their own ending to a favorite story. This encourages creative thinking and artistic expression. They can share their drawings with the class and explain how their ending differs from the original, promoting imagination and narrative skills.

3. Story Sequencing with Pictures

Using printed pictures from the story, children can arrange them in the order they appear in the book. This simple activity helps them understand the sequence of events and reinforces story structure in an engaging way.

4. Responding to Text

After reading a nonfiction book, engage preschoolers in activities that directly respond to the content. For instance, if the book is about butterflies, they could sequence the stages of a butterfly's life cycle. If it's about animals, they could match animals to their habitats. The specific activity will depend on the book's topic, allowing for a variety of interactive and educational experiences.

Listening and Comprehension

Listening comprehension is essential for preschoolers' literacy development. It involves understanding spoken words and stories, which is crucial for learning to read and communicate effectively.

Activities focused on listening skills help children follow instructions, grasp storylines, and develop attention to detail.

Enhancing these skills at an early age sets the stage for successful classroom learning and effective communication.

5. Listening Lotto

A game where children listen to descriptions and match them to pictures. This activity develops listening comprehension and attention to detail, which are crucial for understanding stories and instructions.

6. Direction Games

Children follow multi-step oral directions in a game format. This improves their listening skills and ability to process and follow instructions, which is important for academic success.

Sensory Activities for Writing

Sensory activities play a crucial role in developing literacy skills in preschoolers.

Engaging multiple senses, these activities enhance letter recognition, fine motor skills, and understanding of language concepts. They provide a tactile and interactive experience , making learning more memorable and enjoyable.

Such activities are especially effective in early childhood, laying a strong foundation for reading and writing in a fun, engaging manner.

7. Sensory Writing Trays

In this activity, fill trays with sand or flour, allowing preschoolers to practice writing letters and simple words with their fingers. This sensory experience not only teaches letter recognition but also helps in fine motor skill development, which is crucial for early writing.

8. Playdough Letter Formation

Use playdough to strengthen hand muscles and learn letter shapes. Children can roll, flatten, and shape playdough to form letters of the alphabet. Use playdough mats or other aids to help students form letters correctly. This tactile activity helps in muscle development and provides a fun, hands-on way to practice letter formation.

Phonemic Awareness Development

Phonemic awareness is a key component in early literacy development and is essential for preschoolers.

It involves the ability to hear, identify, and manipulate individual sounds in spoken words.

Activities focused on phonemic awareness lay the groundwork for reading and spelling skills as they teach children to recognize and work with sounds in language.

Engaging in these activities helps build a strong foundation for future literacy success, making learning to read and write a smoother process.

9. Rhyme Time

In this group activity, children are encouraged to think of and recognize rhyming words, enhancing their ability to hear and manipulate sounds in spoken language, a key skill for developing reading abilities.

10. Beginning Sounds Match

Children can match objects or pictures with the same beginning sounds. This activity strengthens their understanding of phonemes, the smallest units of sound, which is crucial for reading and spelling.

11. Sound Bingo

In this version of bingo, children listen for and identify different sounds instead of numbers, which sharpens their phonemic awareness and listening skills, both essential for early reading development.

12. Word Family Game

Children group words represented by pictures into families (e.g., cat, hat, bat). This helps them recognize common spelling patterns and sound structures in words, aiding in future decoding skills.

Alphabet Knowledge

Alphabet knowledge is fundamental in the journey of literacy for preschoolers.

It encompasses recognizing letter shapes, understanding their sounds, and grasping their place in the alphabet sequence.

Activities centered around alphabet knowledge not only familiarize children with letters but also build the basis for phonics, reading, and writing.

This foundational skill is crucial as it sets the stage for children to decode words and begin reading, paving the way for academic success.

13. Alphabet Scavenger Hunt

Children search for objects that start with each letter of the alphabet. This activity promotes letter recognition and understanding the alphabetic principle – foundational for reading and writing.  

14. Letter of the Day

Each day focuses on a different letter, involving activities that highlight its shape, sound, and usage. This reinforces alphabet knowledge, which is crucial for early literacy.

15. Alphabet Sorting

Sorting objects or pictures by their beginning letters helps children understand alphabetical order and letter recognition, key components of early literacy skills.

16. Alphabet Art

Children create art based on different letters. This tactile activity reinforces letter recognition through creative expression, making learning the alphabet engaging and memorable.

17. Letter Tracing

Tracing letters in various mediums like sand or with finger paints. This activity develops fine motor skills and letter formation knowledge, which is essential for writing.

Vocabulary Building

Building a strong vocabulary is a cornerstone of literacy for young learners. It's about more than just learning new words; it's understanding their meanings and contexts.

Engaging in vocabulary-building activities helps preschoolers express themselves better and comprehend what they read and hear.

This development is crucial for reading comprehension and overall language proficiency, forming a foundation for lifelong learning and communication.

18. Word of the Day

Introducing a new word each day, used in sentences and conversations, expands children's vocabulary and understanding of language use, a critical aspect of literacy development.

19. Label the Room

By labeling objects in the classroom, children associate words with their corresponding objects, enhancing word recognition and environmental print awareness, which is foundational for reading.

20. Describing Game

Children describe an object for others to guess, using picture choices for reference. This activity builds vocabulary and descriptive language skills, which are important for expressive language development.

Tips for Integrating Literacy into the Preschool Day

For educators in preschool settings, seamlessly blending literacy into the daily routine is key to fostering an environment rich in language development.

Here are some general tips that can help make literacy a natural and integral part of every school day:

  • Create a Literacy-Rich Environment: Surround children with a variety of reading materials that are easily accessible. This includes books, magazines, posters with poems or rhymes, and labels around the classroom. A visually rich environment stimulates curiosity and invites interaction with written words.
  • Incorporate Literacy in Play: Utilize playtime as an opportunity for literacy learning. This could be through role-playing activities that involve reading signs or menus or building blocks with letters and words. Play naturally engages children and makes learning more relatable.
  • Daily Reading Time: Dedicate a specific time each day for reading. It could be a group activity or individual reading time. This routine helps establish reading as a regular and enjoyable part of the day.
  • Encourage Oral Language Development: Foster a classroom atmosphere where children feel comfortable expressing themselves. Engage them in conversations, ask open-ended questions, and encourage them to describe their experiences and feelings. Oral language skills are foundational for literacy development.
  • Use Every Opportunity to Introduce New Vocabulary: Regularly introduce new words during various activities and discussions. Explain the meanings in simple terms and encourage children to use new vocabulary words in conversations.
  • Storytelling and Creative Expression: Encourage children to tell their own stories. This could be recounting a recent event, making a story, or describing a dream. Storytelling enhances imagination, narrative skills, and vocabulary.
  • Integrate Technology Thoughtfully: Use educational apps and online resources that promote literacy. Interactive storytelling apps, digital books, and educational games can be excellent supplements to traditional teaching methods.
  • Involve Families in Literacy Development: Share tips and strategies with families for promoting literacy at home. Regular communication about what is being learned in class can encourage literacy activities outside of school.

By following these tips, educators can create a dynamic and engaging learning environment where literacy is interwoven throughout the day.

This approach not only supports the development of reading and writing skills but also nurtures a lifelong love for learning and exploration in young children.

Wrapping Up

Strengthening literacy skills in preschoolers is a critical step in their educational journey.

It's essential for future school readiness, laying the groundwork for academic success and effective communication.

These activities, carefully crafted for both enjoyment and learning, are invaluable tools for teachers to nurture young minds, preparing them for the exciting challenges of future schooling.

Kide-Playful-Inquiry-Story-Based-Lesson-Pack-CTA-Orange

Share this post!

Related articles.

The Top 7 Elements of a Highly Effective Math Class

The Top 7 Elements of a Highly Effective Math Class

Effective math instruction is key to helping students understand and enjoy math. It's not just about numbers; it's...

Play-based Learning in Preschool: Learning Through Play

Play-based Learning in Preschool: Learning Through Play

Play is a natural part of early childhood development, making play-based learning a perfect fit for preschool...

Strategies For Building A Math Community In Your Classroom

Strategies For Building A Math Community In Your Classroom

At the start of the school year, teachers have the chance to create a math classroom where every student feels valued...

STAY INFORMED ON THE LATEST IN STEM. SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

Which stem subjects are of interest to you.

STEMscopes Tech Specifications      STEMscopes Security Information & Compliance      Privacy Policy      Terms and Conditions

© 2024 Accelerate Learning  

We use cookies on our website to support technical features that enhance your user experience, and to help us improve our website. By continuing to use this website, you accept our privacy policy .

  • Student Login
  • No-Cost Professional Certificates
  • Call Us: 888-549-6755
  • 888-559-6763
  • Search site Search our site Search Now Close
  • Request Info

Skip to Content (Press Enter)

25 Fun Literacy Activities for Preschoolers

By Callie Malvik on 03/29/2021

An ECE teacher works with two kids on a beading activity

“Literacy is more than just learning to read,” says Mary Muhs, dean of the Rasmussen University School of Education. “It also includes how children interpret and understand what is being read, as well as writing skills and composition. Literacy skills do not just develop overnight.”

"Literacy skills do not just develop overnight."

Muhs emphasizes the importance of building the framework for literacy in preschool and even before then. “If we start early and build on a child’s experience as they grow, they will not only be able to read and write but also love to read and write.”

You understand the importance of mixing in preschool learning activities with the usual fun and games, but who says you can’t do both at once? We scoured the internet to find the best literacy activities for preschoolers to add to your arsenal.

25 Entertaining and educational language activities for preschoolers

The key to instilling a love of learning in little ones is by disguising it with plenty of fun! Bookmark this list for a rainy day, and you’ll always have an entertaining and educational activity ready when you need it.

1. Kick the letter cup

This pre-K activity suggested by Fun Learning for Kids combines letters with sports. Take a stack of plastic cups, and write a single letter on each. Then line the cups up in a row, spreading them out a bit. Give your child a small soccer ball (or any soft ball), and instruct them to kick the ball toward the letter cups. Once they knock a cup down, instruct them to say the name of the letter on the cup. For a more advanced version, say a letter first, and see if they can aim for the corresponding cup.

2. Color sorting letters

Practice colors and letters together with this preschool activity from No Time for Flashcards . All you need is a printable rainbow , some colored label stickers and a marker. Use the marker to write one letter on each circle sticker. Give the child the sticker sheet, and instruct them to peel off each sticker, say the letter and stick it onto the part of the rainbow with the matching color. This helps little ones work on letter recognition, color discrimination and fine motor skills.

3. Alphabet pillow jumping

If your kiddos need to burn off some energy, this letter activity from Toddler Approved will be perfect. Use a stack of paper plates, and write one giant letter on each one. Then use packing tape to secure each plate to a pillow and spread them around the room. Have the kids start on one side of the room and try to jump to the other without touching the floor. As they jump to each new pillow, have them say the letter or letter sound.

4. Connect-the-dots with letters

Hands on as We Grow came up with a letter familiarity activity that will get your little ones moving and their creative juices flowing. Good, old connect-the-dots gets revamped when you write a handful of repeating letters in random patterns down a length of butcher’s paper. Kids can connect the letters in any way they like so long as all of the G ’s are connected to the other G ’s and so on.

5. Alphabet knock down

Toddler Approved came up with this fantastic letter recognition game, especially recommended for kids who love knocking things over. The preparation is minimal and only requires a pool noodle, some popsicle sticks and letter stickers. Once you’ve made the letters on their pool-noodle feet, give your child a ball, call out a letter and see if they can knock it down!

6. Children’s book in a bottle

Storytime has a hands-on element with Deborah J. Stewart’s discovery bottles activity. These cheap and completely customizable literacy tools could be thrown together in an afternoon as a kinesthetic addition to your kids’ favorite stories. Stewart has her students pass the bottle around while she reads them a story in class. She reports that the bottles keep her students calm while engaging more of their attention in the story. Her post on Teach Preschool includes directions, materials and even pictures for easy reference.

7. Crocodile circle

Picture a bin with a crocodile face on top, filled with letters and surprise cards. Students pass the crocodile around the circle singing Crocodile, crocodile down by lake; I’m going to reach right in and see what (letter) you ate . The student holding the crocodile then pulls a letter and calls it out. Extra surprise cards can let you repeat a turn, reverse directions or anything else you want to include. Making Learning Fun includes directions and free printables to make things easy.

8. Feather tip salt tray writing

The title of this activity explains it all. Children get to write (letters, numbers or whole words) in their own tray of salt with a feather tip! Fantastic for motor skill development, this sensory writing experience from Teach Preschool will disguise writing practice as playtime. Be sure to give your students some time to explore the salt tray before their task to minimize confusion.

9. Alphabet ball

All you need for this literacy activity from Playdough to Plato is a beach ball and a sharpie. Simply write letters on the beach ball, spreading them out on all sides. To play the game, have the child (or group of kids) throw the ball up in the air and identify whatever letter is facing them when they catch it. For a more advanced version, have them say the sound or a word that begins with the letter.

10. Magic letter painting

Grab some white note cards, a white wax crayon, some watercolor paints and paint brushes for this activity from Mas & Pas . Use the crayon to write letters on the note cards (you’ll need to press firmly to make the “magic” work.) Give your kiddos some paint and brushes, and tell them to begin painting over the card. Watch their eyes light up when a magic letter is revealed! Ask them what letter it is and what sound it makes.

11. Letter matching archeology game

The perfect accompaniment to a dinosaur-themed unit, this activity from How Wee Learn allows students to practice letter recognition while playing “archeologist.” Drop a few magnetic letters onto a cookie sheet, writing the letters you chose on a piece of paper for your students to use as a key. Cover the letters in flour, and give the kids a makeup brush to carefully “search the site” for hidden letters. When they find one, they must match it to their paper key before continuing the hunt.

12. Mini alphabet sensory bins

This one is especially suited for a classroom environment and could be a staple setup in any preschool teacher’s arsenal. Little Bins for Little Hands gives the classic sensory bins a twist by using objects that all start with the same letter. Tape the letter on the front of each box, or let the kids guess the letter as they examine the objects. Either way, these sensory bins transform a fun, hands-on play activity into a literacy lesson.

13. Snowball throw alphabet game

Paper, tape and ping-pong balls are all you need for this game of “snowball” throwing from Mom Inspired Life . Tape a bunch of letters to a wall, call out the sounds and have your kids throw the snowball at the letter represented. As an added bonus, kids get to work on their coordination as well as their alphabet.

14. Fingerprint letters

Your little finger-paint lovers will enjoy this letter activity from Happy Toddler Playtime . You’ll need a washable ink pad, paper and a marker. Start by writing large letters spread out on the paper. Then instruct your child to dip their finger on the ink pad and make fingerprints along each letter. This is a great way for little ones to start recognizing letter shapes even if they can’t quite trace with a pencil.

15. Number match-slap game

A deck of cards and some duct tape can transform any wall into a correspondence and number recognition system. Hands on as We Grow came up with this activity for preschoolers to “slap” a pre-taped card to its matching card on the wall. This one could even turn into a class scavenger hunt with cards taped on surfaces throughout the room.

16. Word families with ping-pong balls

Teach simple word families with this activity suggested by Fun-A-Day . Golf tees stuck in a Styrofoam base create the perfect platform to interchange different letters written on ping-pong balls. “Dig” becomes “pig” with just one switch! This game lends itself to giggling and throwing the ping-pong balls, and all shenanigans can count as literacy training.

17. Sorting number stickers

It doesn’t get much simpler than this activity created by Learning 4 Kids . Draw a grid on a piece of paper, and place a number in each box. Provide your students with a sheet of number stickers, and let them move the numbers into the box with the matching number. After all of the numbers are used up, encourage them to write each number themselves in the corresponding box.

18. Alphabet rocks

If you (or your kiddos) have the time to collect 52 rocks, this uppercase and lowercase literacy activity could begin in the great outdoors. Wash the rocks, and write an uppercase letter on one side, with the corresponding lowercase letter on the opposite side. Then show words or pictures on index cards, and challenge kids to recreate the word. Meredith at Homegrown Friends says the rocks’ weight and texture was a big hit with her little ones.

19. Triple-tracing name fun

Another great activity from Hands on as We Grow , this will give your little one triple the fun while practicing name writing. Start by writing their name in large letters with a highlighter on a piece of paper. First, ask them to trace the highlighted letters with a pencil. Then, have them trace the letters with glue, followed by yarn (do steps 2 and 3 one letter at a time to avoid a sticky mess!) This triple reinforcement will help the child learn their name letters and leave them with a fun craft at the end.

20. Beginning sounds paint stick

Collect some free paint sticks from a home improvement store, and make these phonological awareness tools from Pre-K Pages . Directions and pictures of the paint sticks come with free printouts to make your job just a little easier.

21. Letter bingo

This twist on the traditional bingo game comes from Frugal Fun for Boys and Girls . Simply make bingo cards with 16 letters on each card, and cut little squares of paper to write the corresponding letters on. Put these squares in a pile for the caller to pull from. For bingo markers, you can use legos, cheerios or anything else you have around.

22. ABC go fish

Another familiar game, this version of Go Fish from How Wee Learn will have your kiddos learning letters without even knowing it. Cut paper into card-sized squares, and write a letter on each one, making two of each letter. It’s best to use groupings of letters so you’re focusing on a few at a time. Split the cards between the players, and follow the standard rules of the game to make as many matching letter pairs as you can. “Do you have a B ?”

23. Sensory messy play

Letters drawn out with whipped cream on tinfoil begin this activity. Provide the students with sprinkles and other cookie-decorating accessories, and let them decorate their letter. Kids Creative Chaos promotes this playtime for its engagement with all five senses while the children work on their letter.

24. Recycled Scrabble play

Old scrabble games are the perfect literacy tool to play with. The Kids Creative Chaos blog recommends arranging the letters to form rhyming words with children who are interested and allowing everyone to play with the tiles as they like. Even if the kids wind up building houses out of the scrabble letters, they are still seeing the letters and establishing familiarity.

25. Alphabet Kaboom!

The Many Little Joys shares this fun preschool learning activity that only requires Popsicle sticks, a marker and a small cup or bucket. Write one letter on each Popsicle stick until you’ve done all 26 letters of the alphabet. Write the word “Kaboom!” on six additional Popsicle sticks, and place them all in the bucket with the letters facing down. Have your child pull out one stick at a time, reading the letter or making the sound of each one. If they pull a “Kaboom!” stick, they have to put all of their sticks back in the bucket and start again.

Prepare for learning and laughs with these preschool learning activities

We all know little ones love to play. So why not leverage that playtime for learning? This list of literacy activities for preschoolers is a great start for introducing youngsters to letters and setting the stage for lifelong learning!

Learn more about the benefits of starting young in our article “ Why the Importance of Early Childhood Education Is Impossible to Ignore .”

For more ideas of fun preschool learning activities, visit our Education Blog !

Related Articles:

  • Toddlers and Technology: A Guide for Responsible Introduction to Devices

EDITOR’S NOTE: This article was originally published in 2016. It has since been updated to include information relevant to 2021.

  • Share on Facebook
  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Pinterest
  • Share on LinkedIn

Request More Information

Talk with an admissions advisor today. Fill out the form to receive information about:

  • Program Details and Applying for Classes
  • Financial Aid and FAFSA (for those who qualify)
  • Customized Support Services
  • Detailed Program Plan

There are some errors in the form. Please correct the errors and submit again.

Please enter your first name.

Please enter your last name.

There is an error in email. Make sure your answer has:

  • An "@" symbol
  • A suffix such as ".com", ".edu", etc.

There is an error in phone number. Make sure your answer has:

  • 10 digits with no dashes or spaces
  • No country code (e.g. "1" for USA)

There is an error in ZIP code. Make sure your answer has only 5 digits.

Please choose a School of study.

Please choose a program.

Please choose a degree.

The program you have selected is not available in your ZIP code. Please select another program or contact an Admissions Advisor (877.530.9600) for help.

The program you have selected requires a nursing license. Please select another program or contact an Admissions Advisor (877.530.9600) for help.

Rasmussen University is not enrolling students in your state at this time.

By selecting "Submit," I authorize Rasmussen University to contact me by email, phone or text message at the number provided. There is no obligation to enroll. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

About the author

Callie Malvik

Callie is the Content Manager at Collegis Education, overseeing blog content on behalf of Rasmussen University. She is passionate about creating quality resources that empower others to improve their lives through education.

female writer

Posted in Early Childhood Education

  • ECE activities
  • early childhood education

Related Content

Two moms walk into a childcare center where a teacher plays with a toddler

Noelle Hartt | 02.08.2024

Children give a group hug to their preschool teacher

Hope Rothenberg | 01.04.2024

An ECE director talks with a teacher near a playground

Brianna Flavin | 12.14.2023

An ECE student smiles and talks into his computer and headphones

Noelle Hartt | 12.07.2023

This piece of ad content was created by Rasmussen University to support its educational programs. Rasmussen University may not prepare students for all positions featured within this content. Please visit www.rasmussen.edu/degrees for a list of programs offered. External links provided on rasmussen.edu are for reference only. Rasmussen University does not guarantee, approve, control, or specifically endorse the information or products available on websites linked to, and is not endorsed by website owners, authors and/or organizations referenced. Rasmussen University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, an institutional accreditation agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.

fun & meaningful learning every day

Emergent Literacy Activities for Preschoolers and Kindergartners

Shared by Mary Catherine Leave a comment

Read below for a look at preschool literacy activities and a variety of emergent literacy activities for preschoolers and kindergartners. These activities will help you plan as you prepare young children to learn to read.

Emergent literacy activities that help children learn to read

Related: St. Patrick’s Day Beginning Sounds

If you’re a regular reader of Fun-A-Day, you already know I’m passionate about early literacy . If you’re new here, come on in and join the discussion.

Based on many conversations with parents and fellow educators, I wanted to delve deeper into the world of beginning reading and “reading readiness”.  Throughout a variety of posts, I’ll be taking a look at important factors that help young children learn to read in real, meaningful, and age-appropriate ways.

Table of Contents

What is Reading Readiness Anyway?

Reading readiness is a term that’s often bandied about in early childhood education. For some reason, it sounds scarier than it really is (probably because it’s fraught with the implication of non-readiness).

Basically, it’s the point at which a child is ready to read. When she’s ready to take all of her pre-reading knowledge and apply it to learning how to read printed words.

There is so much she has to learn prior to being ready, though!

Please keep in mind that each individual child is ready to read on her own terms – there’s not one magical age or time that applies to every single child.

How Can I Teach Emergent Literacy Skills in Meaningful Ways?

Well, I’m glad you asked! As I mentioned above, I want to answer this exact question with the  Ultimate Guide to Learning to Read series!

Since early literacy is a massive topic, I’ll be breaking it down piece by piece. I’ll share a specific concept, explain its importance, and share ways to teach it to children.

Topics will include phonological awareness, book and print awareness, the alphabetic principle, etc. The goal is to explore the elements of early literacy and then share real, hands-on emergent literacy activities for preschoolers and kindergarten kids.

The Ultimate Guide to Learning to Read

Below are all of Fun-A-Day’s emergent literacy activities, all in one handy-dandy place. You’ll find many ideas for teaching emerging reading skills for preschool.

Be sure to check back, as I’ll be updating this page as more activities and ideas are shared! As time goes on, I’ll be sure to break the activities down by categories. That way you can find just what you’re looking for.

Rhyming anchor chart - a simple way to teach important reading readiness concepts in preschool and kindergarten

While you’re waiting for the series to fill out, here are some related posts to read:

  • Teaching children about letters
  • Why kids need to look at the pictures as they learn to read
  • 10 activities to teach beginning sounds and letters
  • 15+ name activities for preschoolers
  • Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star rhyming activity
  • Word walls in preschool and kindergarten

What emergent literacy activities and topics are you interested in learning more about? I would love to hear what would benefit you, so please email me or simply leave a comment below.

The entire reason this series began is because I want to work with other teachers, parents, homeschooling families, and teachers-in-training!

Be sure to hop over to Still Playing School and read what Devany has to say – Early Literacy: The Ultimate Guide to Learning to Read .

Hands-On Preschool Materials

It is imperative that we keep our classrooms stocked with materials that will give our students the hands-on learning experiences that they love (and need!). There are a few specific things that I always keep on-hand in my classroom. Check them out in the list below.

I may get commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

  • Safety scissors
  • Dramatic play items
  • Magnetic letters
  • Math manipulatives
  • Dry erase markers
  • Sensory items
  • Craft supplies
  • Playground balls
  • Music and movement tools
  • Books, books, and more books!

When it comes to preschool, this list is really just skims the surface of the wide variety of materials that can be used. The best thing about this age group is that they learn the most while playing. So, whether they’re playing on the playground, building with blocks, or creating a masterpiece, rest assured that the children are learning so many important skills, all while having fun!

Done-for-You Preschool Resources

Planning meaningful lessons for students week after week, all while balancing other teaching responsibilities and a personal life, can be a daunting task. That’s where  Preschool Teacher 101  comes in to save you time!

Preschool Teacher 101 is excited to share with you some amazing lesson plans, activity packs, and much more! We offer a wide variety of themes that are frequently used in preschool classrooms, as well as some less common (but super interesting) themes. Click on the images below to learn more about some of my favorite literacy product offerings!

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Join  The Pack from Preschool Teacher 101  today for exclusive access to our amazing products. And we even have three different membership options to suit your needs!

The Ultimate Guide to Learning to Read - emergent literacy activities for reading readiness

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Search the Fun!

Fun by categories.

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Interactive Literacy Activities for 3 Year Olds

Table of contents.

  • The Importance of Interactive Literacy Activities for 3 Year Olds
  • Strategies to Incorporate Literacy Activities into Daily Routines
  • Balancing Parenting Responsibilities and Interactive Learning Time
  • Fostering a Positive Parent-Child Relationship through Literacy Activities
  • Customizing Literacy Activities to Suit Your Child's Interests and Learning Style
  • Enhancing Soft Skills Development through Engaging Literacy Activities
  • Creating an Enriching Environment for Learning with Interactive Literacy Activities

Introduction

Are you looking for ways to make learning fun and engaging for your 3-year-old? Look no further! In this article, we will explore the importance of interactive literacy activities for 3-year-olds and how they can enhance their cognitive and language abilities. From storytelling to role-playing, these activities offer a treasure trove of benefits that go beyond reading and writing skills. Join us as we delve into the world of interactive literacy activities and discover how they can transform learning into a delightful and engaging experience for your little one.

1. The Importance of Interactive Literacy Activities for 3 Year Olds

"Welcome to the vibrant realm of interactive literacy activities, where the enchantment of words and tales comes alive for your little ones. These activities stretch beyond the fundamental skills of reading and writing. They instill an adoration for narratives, broaden their vocabulary, and hone their listening and speaking abilities. The allure of these activities lies in their ability to transform learning into a delightful and engaging experience for 3-year-olds, stimulating their curiosity and imagination. This makes them an exceptional tool for enhancing their cognitive and language abilities.

Interactive Literacy Activities for 3 Year Olds

Not only do these activities enhance cognitive abilities like problem-solving, critical thinking, and creativity, they also promote social and emotional development. Collaborative activities teach them valuable social skills like sharing, taking turns, and listening to others. These activities also encourage a sense of belonging and self-confidence, as children express themselves and contribute to the group. Thus, interactive literacy activities offer a holistic approach to learning, weaving together cognitive, social, and emotional development.

To foster an affinity for stories, consider reading aloud to them regularly. Bring the story to life with expressive voices and gestures. Encourage their participation by asking questions about the story or inviting them to predict the next turn of events. Props or visual aids can augment their understanding and enjoyment of the story. Creating a cozy and comfortable reading environment can make the experience more enjoyable for them.

Expanding vocabulary through interactive literacy activities can be achieved by engaging in reading and writing exercises. This can include reading books, articles, and poems and writing responses, summaries, and creative pieces. Vocabulary games, word puzzles, and interactive online platforms can also enhance vocabulary skills.

Developing listening and speaking skills is crucial for language development and overall communication abilities. Storytelling, role-playing, and engaging in conversations can enhance these skills. Encouraging children to actively listen and respond to others, as well as providing opportunities for them to practice speaking in different contexts, can greatly contribute to their language proficiency and confidence.

Interactive literacy activities can greatly enhance cognitive and language skills. These activities often involve problem-solving, decision-making, and creative thinking, all of which contribute to the development of cognitive skills such as memory, attention, and logical reasoning. Through activities like storytelling, role-playing, and group discussions, children can use and expand their vocabulary, develop their communication skills, and enhance their understanding of language structures and concepts.

While it is unclear if Magic Kids offers a wide range of educational and enjoyable literacy activities, you can try incorporating interactive activities and games into the learning process to make it fun and engaging. This can include using educational videos, interactive quizzes, and hands-on experiments. Providing encouragement and rewards for progress can create a positive and supportive learning environment.

In the end, the goal of interactive literacy activities is to provide a dynamic and engaging approach to learning that effectively promotes the development of cognitive and language skills in children. The magic of words and stories awaits your little ones!"

2. Strategies to Incorporate Literacy Activities into Daily Routines

Incorporating Literacy Activities into Daily Routines

There are also a plethora of interactive literacy activities available on Magic Kids that can be seamlessly integrated into your child's routine. This makes learning an exciting and natural part of their day. The key to success is consistency, and by making reading and writing a regular part of their day, you can help them develop strong literacy skills and a love for learning.

Research supports the benefits of incorporating just 20 minutes of reading into your child's daily routine. The aim is to foster a lifelong habit for your family that goes beyond the conventional reading routine. You can tailor your reading routine to match your child's age, reading level, energy level, and interests. For instance, you can allow reading to "spill over" into other parts of the day and align with your child's interests. Choose books and formats that your child is fond of or curious about. Re-reading is also a crucial part of children's development, so embrace it. If you happen to miss a reading session, don't worry, simply make up for it the next day.

In collaboration with Reading is Fundamental and Lee Low Books, a publisher specializing in diversity and multiculturalism, we also recommend parents to access resources from Reading is Fundamental, the National Center for Families Learning, Colorín Colorado, Reading Rockets, and Embrace Race for reading tips and inspiration.

Creating a literacy-rich home environment that supports your child's reading and writing skills is crucial. This can be achieved by ensuring reading and writing materials are easily accessible at home, sharing your love of reading and writing with your child, setting aside time to read together, and having fun with word games to build literacy skills. Regular visits to the library can also be a great way to foster a love for reading in your child.

Children who are read to at least three times per week by a family member are almost twice as likely to score in the top 25% in reading compared to children who are read to less than three times per week. Reading at bedtime alone can expose children to 18 million words per year. Word and language-focused board games can also aid in building literacy skills. Regular visits to the library not only provide access to child-focused programs but also fresh reading material.

Remember, the goal is to make reading engaging and enjoyable for your children. So, embrace re-reading and don't stress over missed reading sessions. The idea is to create a reading routine at home and highlight the various ways parents can make reading engaging and enjoyable for their children.

3. Balancing Parenting Responsibilities and Interactive Learning Time

Balancing Parenting Responsibilities and Interactive Learning Time

Children are naturally inclined towards learning. Their first few years are filled with rapid absorption of information and skill acquisition, often without formal instruction. Such natural curiosity and capacity to learn can be leveraged to promote self-directed learning , where the child is in control of their own educational journey, exploring their interests and learning at their own pace. This form of learning has numerous cognitive and mental health benefits, fostering independence, building confidence, and enhancing problem-solving skills. Moreover, it prepares children for the careers of the future and instills the habit of lifelong learning.

The process of learning to walk is an excellent illustration of self-directed learning . It's a complex skill that children master not through structured lessons, but through their own problem-solving abilities and a strong desire to reach their loved ones or caregivers. Similarly, children can become fluent in a foreign language in a matter of months when immersed in a foreign environment. This again underscores their innate ability to learn without formal instruction. Even the fascination many eight-year-olds have with dinosaurs, to the point of knowing the names of dinosaurs yet to be discovered, is a testament to their capacity for self-directed learning .

To ensure that learning is a part of your everyday routine, it's important to establish a schedule and create a structured routine. This can include setting aside dedicated time for interactive learning, such as reading together, engaging in educational games, or participating in online learning platforms. Engaging children in conversations about their day, asking open-ended questions to stimulate critical thinking and problem-solving skills can also prove beneficial. Additionally, involve your child in age-appropriate household chores and responsibilities, which can help teach them important life skills while also promoting a sense of responsibility.

To manage tasks while your child learns, you can try implementing some parenting hacks. These hacks can help you stay organized and ensure that you can balance your own tasks while also providing support to your child. One effective hack is to create a schedule or routine that includes dedicated time for both your own tasks and your child's learning activities. This way, you can allocate specific blocks of time for each task and ensure that you can give your child the attention they need while also taking care of your own responsibilities. Additionally, you can explore online resources and educational websites that offer interactive learning materials for children. This can help keep your child engaged and occupied while you focus on your tasks.

Creating a learning-friendly environment at home can be beneficial for children's education. Designate a study area, establish a routine, minimize distractions, provide necessary resources, encourage curiosity and exploration, and create a supportive atmosphere at home. Remember, every child is unique, so adapt these tips according to your child's individual needs and learning style.

Incorporating interactive learning into everyday tasks can have several benefits. It can make learning more engaging and enjoyable for students, leading to increased motivation and participation. Interactive learning allows students to actively participate in the learning process, which can enhance their understanding and retention of information. It also promotes critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and collaboration among students. Additionally, incorporating interactive learning into everyday tasks can help students develop essential 21st-century skills, such as digital literacy and communication skills.

In essence, striking the right balance between parenting duties and interactive learning is achievable. With the right tools, resources, and mindset, you can ensure that your child's natural curiosity and capacity for learning are nurtured, while also finding time for your other responsibilities. This approach not only cultivates a love for learning in your child but also fosters independence and prepares them for the challenges of the 21st century.

4. Fostering a Positive Parent-Child Relationship through Literacy Activities

Engaging in literacy activities with your child is not just about learning; it's an opportunity to create lasting memories together. Activities like reading a book, playing a word game, or reciting a nursery rhyme are not just educational, but also delightful ways to bond. These moments help you connect with your child and ignite their natural curiosity, resulting in enriched learning experiences and a strengthened bond between you.

As influential role models, we can show our children that reading is not just necessary but also enjoyable. By regularly indulging in reading ourselves, we can inspire our children to perceive reading as a rewarding activity.

Reading aloud with your child is more than just a literacy activity; it's an intimate bonding experience. This simple yet effective method opens channels of communication, allowing you to share experiences and create memories together. You can take turns reading aloud, discussing the story, or even acting it out, making the reading experience interactive.

To spark your child's interest in reading, consider making books easily accessible at home. A diverse collection of books on various topics can pique their curiosity. Letting your child choose the book they want to read can significantly increase their engagement and enjoyment. This simple act of choice can empower them and make them feel more involved in the reading process.

Incorporating reading into your daily routine can instill a love for reading in your child. Regular reading times, be it in the morning, evening, or right before bed, can create a sense of calm and continuity.

To make reading more relevant and engaging for your child, try connecting the world of books to real-life experiences. Find books that align with their school curriculum or personal interests. This can help them see reading not as a chore but as an exciting exploration.

The author of the article shares personal experiences of strengthening their bond with their child through reading aloud. They also mention utilizing resources like museums and online content to further engage children with the subjects they are reading about.

With a variety of literacy activities, Magic Kids is here to aid in fostering a positive relationship with your child while also enhancing their learning experience. But remember, the goal is not just teaching them to read, but to love reading.

In addition, engaging in educational games that promote literacy, such as word puzzles or spelling games, can be enjoyable activities to do together while also enhancing your child's literacy skills. Regular visits to the library can further stimulate their curiosity, allowing them to explore a vast collection of books.

Nurturing your child's curiosity through literacy activities can be beneficial for their overall development. Encourage writing as well; this can help them express their thoughts and ideas, fostering their curiosity and imagination.

Finally, spending quality time with your child during these activities can strengthen the parent-child bond and create lasting memories. Remember, it's not just about teaching them to read, but about teaching them to love reading.

5. Customizing Literacy Activities to Suit Your Child's Interests and Learning Style

Every child is a unique being, with their own distinct personality and learning style. Some children may be drawn to the magical world of storybooks, while others may find joy in word games or the rhythmic beats of songs. It's essential to discover your child's interests and learning style, personalizing literacy activities that cater specifically to them. This approach not only makes learning a joyful experience but also enhances its effectiveness.

Magic Kids puts the power in your hands by offering a tailored curriculum that enables you to personalize literacy activities to align with your child's interests and learning style. As a result, your child can reap the maximum benefits from their learning journey.

You may have countless questions about how to support your child's literacy at home. Magic Kids' "Reading SOS" and "Writing SOS" sections address these concerns by providing expert answers to real questions from families. These sections cover everything from tips for strengthening vocabulary and comprehension to advice on enhancing phonemic awareness, phonics, and fluency skills.

In addition, the curriculum includes resources that shed light on how to support children with dyslexia and other learning disabilities. The "Reading 101" guide aids in understanding the process of learning to read and write, equipping you to support your child more effectively.

The curriculum also addresses the needs of adolescent readers and writers in grades 6-12 who might be struggling with literacy. The inclusion of diverse books and teaching resources recommended by Read Across America further promotes diversity and inclusion in the learning process.

To further enrich your resources to support your child's literacy at home, the curriculum includes a video series where experts answer real questions from families. The emphasis here is on parental involvement in bolstering children's literacy skills, providing practical tips and resources to help families create a literacy-rich environment at home.

To customize literacy activities in Magic Kids for your child's interests, explore the different sections and features available on the website. Look for options that allow you to personalize the activities or choose specific topics or themes that align with your child's interests. Observing your child's behavior and preferences during different learning activities can also be an effective method to identify their learning style. Pay attention to whether they enjoy visual aids, such as pictures or videos, or if they prefer listening to audio recordings. Additionally, take note of whether they prefer hands-on activities or if they excel in verbal communication.

By understanding your child's learning style, you can tailor literacy activities in Magic Kids to match their preferences and optimize their learning experience. Customizing literacy activities in Magic Kids can make the learning experience more engaging and enjoyable for your child. This personalized approach can help them stay motivated and develop a positive attitude towards literacy.

Furthermore, Magic Kids offers a variety of resources and materials specifically designed to enhance literacy skills, including reading materials, phonics exercises, and writing prompts. By tailoring the activities to your child's needs and preferences, you can create a fun and personalized learning experience.

Every child's learning journey is unique. By using resources such as Magic Kids that allow you to customize literacy activities to suit your child's preferences and learning style, you can ensure that their journey is not only enjoyable but also fruitful.

6. Enhancing Soft Skills Development through Engaging Literacy Activities

Fostering crucial soft skills in children extends beyond merely focusing on reading and writing abilities. Interactive literacy activities serve as an essential tool in this process, enhancing communication, creativity, problem-solving, and critical thinking abilities. Magic Kids offers a variety of such enriching literacy activities, meticulously designed to strengthen your child's soft skills while making learning an enjoyable experience.

An instance which underscores the impact of well-structured literacy activities is the significant improvement in literacy rates at the Rapides Parish School Board in Louisiana. The school board faced hurdles due to the teachers' lack of adequate literacy training, and the introduction of Lexia Learning Systems' program, LETRS®, brought about a revolutionary change. The implementation of this program led to a substantial increase in students' literacy scores, thereby emphasizing the efficacy of carefully crafted literacy activities.

This change was particularly noticeable in previously underperforming schools, leading to a more balanced educational environment. As a district leader highlighted, the most substantial improvements were seen in the lowest performing schools, resulting in a more equitable educational setting. This statement emphasizes the transformative power of literacy activities and their potential to level the academic playing field for all students.

The progress was so significant that the administrators described the students' improvement as 'incredible.' This points to the potential of literacy activities not only in enhancing academic performance but also in fostering confidence and a love for learning in students.

Much like the LETRS® program, Magic Kids aspires to make a difference in children's lives through engaging literacy activities. Magic Kids' literacy activities are aimed at promoting a love for reading and learning, while also fostering key soft skills that are beneficial to children both academically and personally. They offer a variety of literacy activities that help in developing skills like communication, creativity, problem-solving, and critical thinking. Enhance your child's soft skills with Magic Kids' engaging literacy activities.

Magic Kids' literacy activities are designed to engage children in reading, writing, and storytelling, while also encouraging their imagination and critical thinking skills. By incorporating elements of magic and fantasy into the activities, they aim to make literacy more fun and exciting for children, ultimately fostering their love for reading and creativity.

By engaging in these activities, children can develop critical thinking skills, improve their ability to solve problems creatively, and enhance their overall problem-solving abilities. The literacy activities provided by Magic Kids are designed to be fun and engaging, while also challenging children to think critically and come up with creative solutions.

Participating in Magic Kids literacy activities can enhance children's communication skills, creativity, critical thinking, and problem-solving abilities. Furthermore, it can improve their ability to work in teams, develop empathy and emotional intelligence, and boost their self-confidence. These skills are crucial for children's overall growth and can contribute to their success in various aspects of life.

The success of the Rapides Parish School Board in Louisiana stands as a testament to the transformative power of literacy activities in enhancing learning outcomes. Magic Kids hopes to inspire similar success stories with their range of engaging literacy activities.

7. Creating an Enriching Environment for Learning with Interactive Literacy Activities

Creating a stimulating environment for your child's learning journey is a multifaceted process. It's not just about providing a range of learning tools, but about sparking their curiosity and maintaining their interest. Interactive literacy activities are a prime example of how to build such an environment. By engaging your child in these activities, learning time becomes a much-anticipated event, one that they look forward to.

One key factor to this is providing a variety of educational resources and materials that cater to different learning styles and interests. From books to technology tools, these resources should be diverse and tailored to your child's needs. This ensures that learning is not a one-size-fits-all process, but a personal journey that caters to their unique learning style.

Creating a positive and inclusive learning environment is another important aspect. This involves promoting collaboration, respect, and open communication among students. By creating a safe and supportive environment, children feel comfortable taking risks and expressing their ideas, which is essential for their overall growth and development.

Engaging and interactive teaching strategies can greatly enhance the learning experience. This could include using multimedia resources, incorporating real-life examples and scenarios, and providing opportunities for hands-on learning and critical thinking. By incorporating elements of surprise, novelty, and problem-solving into lessons, you can further stimulate curiosity and encourage children to actively engage in the learning process.

Interactive learning plays a crucial role in enhancing the overall learning experience for students. It allows students to actively participate in the learning process, leading to better engagement and retention of information. By encouraging active participation and collaboration, interactive learning helps students develop effective communication and teamwork skills that are essential for their future success.

While the Magic Kids website offers a variety of resources for children, it's important to remember that interactive learning isn't limited to online resources. Hands-on experiments, group discussions, and multimedia presentations promote critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and creativity among students. By incorporating these methods, you're not only making learning enjoyable, but you're also fostering a positive and supportive learning environment.

To provide immersive and interactive learning experiences for children, consider using online platforms or websites that offer educational content and activities. These platforms can provide a wide range of interactive resources such as videos, games, quizzes, and simulations to engage children in the learning process. Explore Magic Kids' online platform for interactive and engaging learning experiences. Additionally, virtual reality (VR) or augmented reality (AR) technologies can be utilized to create a more immersive and realistic learning environment.

In conclusion, creating an enriching learning environment for your child involves a mix of interactive activities, diverse resources, and a supportive environment. By incorporating these elements, you're not just making learning enjoyable, but you're also fostering a love for learning that will serve them well in their educational journey.

Interactive literacy activities for 3-year-olds offer a world of benefits that go beyond reading and writing skills. They enhance cognitive and language abilities, promote social and emotional development, and foster a love for learning. By engaging children in activities like storytelling, role-playing, and interactive games, parents can create a dynamic and engaging approach to learning.

Incorporating literacy activities into daily routines doesn't have to be daunting. It can be as simple as sharing a story at bedtime or playing word games during mealtimes. By making reading and writing a regular part of their day, parents can help their children develop strong literacy skills and a love for learning.

Balancing parenting responsibilities with interactive learning time may seem challenging, but with the right approach, it can become an exciting journey that seamlessly integrates learning into everyday life. Resources like Magic Kids offer a variety of engaging learning activities that keep children absorbed in learning while parents manage other tasks.

Engaging in literacy activities with children is not just about learning; it's an opportunity to create lasting memories and strengthen the parent-child bond. By reading aloud together, making books easily accessible at home, and connecting reading to real-life experiences, parents can foster a positive relationship with their child while enhancing their literacy skills.

Every child is unique, with their own interests and learning style. Customizing literacy activities to suit their preferences can make the learning experience more engaging and enjoyable. Magic Kids offers personalized curriculum options that allow parents to tailor activities to their child's interests and optimize their learning experience.

Interactive literacy activities also enhance soft skills development such as communication, creativity, problem-solving, and critical thinking. These skills are crucial for children's overall development and success in various aspects of life.

Creating an enriching environment for learning involves providing diverse resources tailored to different learning styles, promoting collaboration and open communication among students, using engaging teaching strategies, and incorporating interactive elements into lessons. Online platforms like Magic Kids provide a wide range of interactive resources that make learning immersive and enjoyable.

In conclusion, interactive literacy activities are key to transforming learning into a delightful experience for 3-year-olds. By incorporating these activities into daily routines, customizing them to suit each child's interests and learning style, fostering a positive parent-child relationship through bonding over literacy activities, enhancing soft skills development, and creating an enriching environment for learning with interactive resources like Magic Kids Start free trial , parents can make learning fun, engaging, and impactful for their little ones.

SplashLearn Logo

  • Math for Kids
  • Parenting Resources
  • ELA for Kids
  • Teaching Resources

SplashLearn Blog

15 Famous Mathematicians in History That Kids Should Know

11 Best Multiplication Apps for Kids

How to Teach Number Formation in 5 Easy Steps

13 Best Resources for Math Videos for Kids: Math Made Fun

How to Teach Skip Counting to Kids in 9 Easy Steps

6 Best Alternatives to Public Schooling: A Guide for Parents

How to Cope With Test Anxiety in 12 Easy Ways

Developmental Milestones for 4 Year Olds: The Ultimate Guide

Simple & Stress-Free After School Schedule for Kids of All Ages

When Do Kids Start Preschool: Age & Readiness Skills

How to Improve Reading Comprehension: Strategies & Tips

40 Best Summer Writing Prompts for Kids of All Ages

12 Best Ways to Teach Rhyming Words to Kids

How to Teach Letter Sound in 6 Easy Steps

How to Teach Letter Formation to Kids in 9 Easy Steps

12 Best Tips for Substitute Teachers

30 best classroom reward ideas for elementary students.

12 Best Websites for English Teachers

10 Best Game-Based Learning Platforms for Kids

60 Fun Animal Facts for Kids

SplashLearn Blog

15 Best Learning Activities for Your 3 Year Old Preschooler

Child playing with wooden blocks

5 Fun Developmental Activities for 3-Year-Olds

5 indoor activities for 3-year-olds, 5 engaging art activities for 3-year-olds, how educational activities transform kids’ lives.

Toddlers are very active and always on the go! As a parent, it can be tough to keep up with their energy levels. However, it’s important to find ways to keep your toddler occupied and engaged and learning!

Here are 15 activities for 3-year-olds that are both fun and educational:

A screenshot of the online phonics game

1. Recognizing Letters and Sounds

Learning activities for 3-year-olds are most fun when they are dressed up as family games, pretend plays, or become parts of our daily activities and observations. Recognizing letters and their sounds is one such activity that can be done in several ways.

Things you need:

A whiteboard or chalkboard, some colored markers or chalk. You can also use letter cards, board games, or online games for kids .

How to play:

You can play games where you write a letter on the board and teach your child to read it. Preschoolers can start learning both uppercase and lowercase letters . If they get it right, give them a point. If not, give them a clue and let them try again.

You can also play the “sound it out” game. Write a letter on the board and ask your child to make the sound it makes. Again, if they get it right, give them a point. If not, give them a clue and let them try again.

Pointing to letters written somewhere as you go about your day—a cereal box, a signboard, a magazine, etc.—is also an easy activity to help your child learn to read them. Children can also trace letters with their fingers on the sand, match uppercase and lowercase letters, erase letters on a chalkboard, etc. 

If you are busy, play some alphabet songs for your toddler to dance or let them play some online English games .

Skills your preschooler will learn:

Letter recognition, phonemic awareness, letter sounds

SplashLearn: Most Comprehensive Learning Program for PreK-5

Product logo

SplashLearn inspires lifelong curiosity with its game-based PreK-5 learning program loved by over 40 million children. With over 4,000 fun games and activities, it’s the perfect balance of learning and play for your little one.

2. Reading with Your Child

Reading books with your child is one of the best things you can do for their development. Not only does it improve language skills, but it also helps them learn sight words, develop their imagination, and understand the world around them.

Books that are appropriate for your child’s age and interests, such as picture books, easy readers, etc.

Sit down with your child and read a book together. You can take turns reading the pages or have your child read the whole book to you.

Books for toddlers should be short and have many pictures supporting the story. This will help keep their attention span, and they will be more likely to understand the concepts in the book.

Read word by word, pointing to each word with your finger, and ask inferential questions based on how, why, what, when, and where to encourage the thinking skills in kids .

Language skills, sight words , attention span, comprehension, memory, imagination

3. Making Up Stories

Children love to listen to and tell stories, and this is an activity that can be done anywhere, anytime. It’s the perfect thing to do in a car while traveling, at bedtime, or even while waiting in line at the grocery store.

None! Just your child’s imagination

Have your child make up a story, either on their own or with your help. Encourage them to use their imagination and be as creative as they want. If they get stuck, you can prompt them with questions or ideas. You may also correct their grammar along the way, but it’s important to let them be creative and have fun with this activity.

If your child is stumped, set an example by asking them for three or four words and make a story that uses all of them. For instance, if they give you the words “cat,” “green,” “ball,” and “tree,” you could make up a story about a green cat that climbs a tree to fetch a ball.

Eventually, you can give words to your child and have them make up a story using those words.

Creativity, imagination, storytelling, communication

4. Playing a Number Game

Offline and online, math can be fun for kids if it’s taught interactively and creatively. Playing the number sense games is one such activity that will help your child learn numbers, counting, and basic arithmetic operations in a fun and engaging way.

A whiteboard or a chalkboard, some colored markers or chalk. You can also use games focusing on numbers and counting, such as board games, card games, etc. Online math games are also available.

There are many games that you can play with your child to help him learn numbers and math concepts. One such game is the “guess the number” game. Write down a number between 1 and 10 on the board, and ask your child to guess it. If he gets it right, give him a point. If not, give him a clue and let him have another try.

You can also play the “greater than or less than” game. Write down two numbers on the board, such as 3 and 5, and ask your child which number is greater. If he gets it right, give him a point. If not, give him a clue and let him try again.

Numbers , counting , and basic arithmetic operations include addition , subtraction , multiplication , and division .

5. Sorting Activities

Sorting is a fun activity that helps children learn about different attributes such as size, shape, color, etc. It also helps them develop problem-solving skills.

Various objects can be sorted according to size, shape, color, etc. You can use blocks, balls, toy cars, berries, buttons, etc.

Let your child choose a few objects and ask him to sort them according to size, shape, color, etc. For example, they can sort blocks by size or toy cars by color. As they sort the objects, help them identify the attribute they use for sorting.

Sorting, categorizing, and problem-solving.

Check out the best sensory activities for 3-year-olds you can try!

A little girl drawing something

One of the favorite preschool activities for 3-year-olds is drawing. At this point, the artistic skills of a child are not really important. Drawing is a fun activity for toddlers to express themselves, work on their fine motor skills, and have fun!

Paper, crayons, markers, colored pencils

Sit with your child and encourage them to draw whatever comes to mind. You can also give some drawing ideas to kids , such as “Draw a picture of your family,” “Draw a picture of your favorite animal,” etc. You may make a drawing and ask your child to trace it or copy it.

Creativity, fine motor skills, imagination, attention span

7. Building with Blocks

One of the easy, no-mess activities for 3-year-olds at home is to let them build with blocks. It is amazing how much fun and creative they can be with this simple activity.

Blocks are also a great way for children to learn about shapes, sizes, colors, and patterns.

Blocks of various shapes and sizes

Let your child play with the blocks freely or give him or her some challenges, such as “build a tower as tall as you can,” “make a house for your favorite stuffed toy,” etc.

Creativity, imagination, problem-solving, eye-hand coordination, shapes, colors, patterns

8. Paper Cutting with Safety Scissors

Children feel empowered with a tool in their hands. And they are so proud of themselves when they can cut the paper!

Paper, safety scissors, craft supplies like pom poms, googly eyes (optional)

Give your child a piece of paper and let him or her cut it any way they want. If you like, you can also give some challenges, such as “cut out a circle,” “make a snowflake,” etc. You can help your child decorate the cutouts with craft supplies if desired.

Fine motor skills, creativity, imagination, attention span

*Please note that only safety scissors should be used for this activity. Regular scissors are too sharp for little ones.*

9. Doing Daily Chores

You’ll be surprised at all the things your toddlers can do if only you let them try. Giving them some simple chores to do not only helps them learn some valuable life skills but also makes kids feel proud and accomplished.

Chores that are appropriate for your child’s age and abilities, such as making their bed, dusting furniture, setting the table, etc.

Choose a chore that you would like your child to help with. Then, show them how to do it and let them try it themselves. Some of the chores that a 3-year-old can do may require some assistance or supervision, but it’s important to let them explore their capabilities and try new things.

A toddler can easily be overwhelmed with too many chores, so it’s important to start small. Choose one or two simple tasks that you know your child can handle. As they get older and more capable, you can give them more chores to do. Remember to praise them for a job well done!

Daily living skills, responsibility, independence, pride, satisfaction

10. Role-playing

What’s funnier than seeing a tiny toddler acting like a fat aunt or an old grandpa? Role-plays are one of the best activities for 3-year-olds as they help them learn about different emotions, people, and situations.

None! Just your child’s imagination. A few props like a walking stick, a hat, a lady’s purse, or a wig could come in handy to help set the scene.

Have your child choose a character that he or she would like to play. It could be anyone—a family member, a friend, a cartoon character, an animal, etc. Then, encourage them to act out the part. They can speak differently, use props, and do whatever they want to bring the character to life. Children learn to observe people around them and understand their emotions in this way.

Creativity, imagination, emotional intelligence, communication, problem-solving

Check out the best outdoor activities for 3-year-olds here!

A little girl wearing an astronaut costume

11. Playing Dress Up

Dress-up games are not gender-specific. Most children love them! This activity helps 3-year-olds use their imagination, learn about social norms and roles, and have lots of fun!

Old clothes, hats, scarves, jewelry, etc., can be used as dress-up items. You can also use old sheets or towels to make capes or skirts. You can also use actual costumes if you have them.

Let your child choose what they want to be, and then help them get dressed in the appropriate clothing. If you like, you can also act out a play or story together with your child in their new costume.

Creativity, imagination, role-playing, problem-solving

12. Making Music with Household Items

This is one of the fun activities for 3-year-olds that can be done with items that you already have around the house. It’s a great way to introduce your child to music and help them develop a sense of rhythm.

Household items that can be used as musical instruments, such as pots and pans, plastic containers, wooden spoons, etc. You can also use actual musical instruments if you have them.

Let your child choose what he or she wants to use as an instrument. Then, encourage them to make music with it however they want. You can also sing along or dance to the music!

Music skills, sense of rhythm, gross motor skills, creativity, imagination

13. Making Art with Thumb , Hand, or Foot Impressions

Most toddlers do not know how to go about making an art piece. But they love to play a role in helping make one! This activity allows them to do just that, resulting in a beautiful piece of art that you can hang on your fridge or wall.

Non-toxic paint, paper, and something to use as a stamp (such as potato, carrot, or eraser)

Let your child choose what paint color he or she wants to use. Then, help them make a thumbprint, handprint, or footprint on the paper. You can also make patterns with stamps by carving a shape into a potato, carrot, or eraser. Once the paint is dry, you can hang up the artwork!

Creativity, imagination, fine motor skills, color recognition

14. Creating a Collage

A collage is a great way for toddlers to express their creativity. They can make amazing birthday cards with photo collages, make wall-hanging art, or have fun tearing up paper and gluing it back together!

Paper, safety scissors, glue, and any other materials you want to use for the collage (such as tissue paper, construction paper, feathers, buttons, ribbons, etc.)

Let your child choose what they want to use for their collage. Then, help them cut out the paper or other materials into small pieces. Once they have a good pile of pieces, they can glue them down onto another piece of paper. You can help them with this if needed.

Creativity, imagination, fine motor skills, color recognition, pattern-making

15. Drawing with Chalk on the Sidewalk

If you live in a safe neighborhood, your children can display their artistic skills outside the home by drawing with chalk on the sidewalk or driveway. This activity is great for gross motor skills and allows you to teach your child about shapes, colors, and patterns.

Chalk in various colors

Let your child choose what color of chalk he or she wants to use. Then, help them draw a picture or make patterns on the sidewalk. You can also join in and create your own chalk masterpiece!

Educate children about different cultures where making art to decorate entrance gates and doorways is a tradition. Indians make rangoli, Chinese make a dragon or zodiac animal drawings, while in the Philippines, it is common to see people painting on bamboo mats called banig . In this way, you can introduce your toddlers to other cultures.

Creativity, imagination, gross motor skills, shapes, colors, pattern-making

Happy girl on a trampoline in the park

A study on Chinese children found that organized extracurricular activities (EAs) are strongly associated with early reading, math, and social skills. Another study indicated that the involvement of parents in preschool children’s learning activities at home during the COVID-19 pandemic was beneficial to kids’ learning behavior and emotional health. 

These studies seem to suggest that any activity that encourages learning, socialization, and creativity would benefit our little ones and shape them into more confident, woke, and aware individuals. 

Some benefits of educational activities for 3-year-olds are:

  • They help develop cognitive skills, including problem-solving, memory, and attention span.
  • EAs also nurture social skills such as cooperation, empathy, and communication.
  • These activities can also boost self-esteem and confidence in children.
  • Fun and educational activities are also great for developing gross and fine motor skills.

So go ahead and try out some educational activities with your 3-year-old today! You might just be surprised at how much they enjoy it—and how much they learn from it too.

Explore more online educational resources for kids to aid their learning experience.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

How to choose a good educational activity for my 3 year old.

When choosing an activity for your 3-year-old, it is important to consider their interests, abilities, and attention span. You also want to ensure the activity is developmentally appropriate and safe. If you are unsure whether an activity is appropriate for your child, you can always consult their pediatrician or a child development expert.

How can I get my toddler to sit still and focus on an activity?

This can be a challenge for many parents! One tip is to try to find activities that your child is interested in and that they enjoy doing. Also, make sure you provide plenty of breaks during the activity so that your child doesn’t become overwhelmed or frustrated. Finally, praise your child when they display good behavior so that they know that you are pleased with their efforts.

How to help my toddler express their creativity?

There are many ways in which you can help your toddler express their creativity. One way is to provide plenty of opportunities for them to explore different materials and mediums, such as crayons, paint, clay, etc. You can also encourage them to sing, dance, or act out stories. And finally, make sure to praise their efforts and creativity, no matter what the outcome may be.

literacy activity for 3 year olds

12 Best Social Skills Activities for Kids of All Ages

12 Best Pattern Activities for Preschoolers in 2024

15 Best Movement Activities for Preschoolers in 2024

  • Pre-Kindergarten
  • Kindergarten

Most Popular

Teacher high fiving students restorative practices in the classroom

15 Best Report Card Comments Samples

Riddles for Kids

117 Best Riddles for Kids (With Answers)

Best good vibes quotes

40 Best Good Vibes Quotes to Brighten Your Day

Recent posts.

Tips for substitute teacher written on board

50 Best Father’s Day Quotes: Celebrate with Laughter & Love

Math & ela | prek to grade 5, kids see fun., you see real learning outcomes..

Watch your kids fall in love with math & reading through our scientifically designed curriculum.

Parents, try for free Teachers, use for free

Banner Image

  • Games for Kids
  • Worksheets for Kids
  • Math Worksheets
  • ELA Worksheets
  • Math Vocabulary
  • Number Games
  • Addition Games
  • Subtraction Games
  • Multiplication Games
  • Division Games
  • Addition Worksheets
  • Subtraction Worksheets
  • Multiplication Worksheets
  • Division Worksheets
  • Times Tables Worksheets
  • Reading Games
  • Writing Games
  • Phonics Games
  • Sight Words Games
  • Letter Tracing Games
  • Reading Worksheets
  • Writing Worksheets
  • Phonics Worksheets
  • Sight Words Worksheets
  • Letter Tracing Worksheets
  • Prime Number
  • Order of Operations
  • Long multiplication
  • Place value
  • Parallelogram
  • SplashLearn Success Stories
  • SplashLearn Apps
  • [email protected]

© Copyright - SplashLearn

Banner Image

Make study-time fun with 14,000+ games & activities, 450+ lesson plans, and more—free forever.

Parents, Try for Free Teachers, Use for Free

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Morning Work

Teaching tips, 35 fun literacy activities to help kids with reading.

Did you know that children who are  read to  at least three times a week are almost  twice as likely  to score in the top 25% in reading compared to children who are read to less often?

Some of the best ways to help children are through some simple literacy ideas that you can do at home or in the classroom. It really doesn’t have to be hard! I promise! Make it easy!

Let’s check out 35 fun literacy activities for kids. There are so many that don’t even involve supplies!

35 literacy activities for kindergarten

What Exactly are Early Literacy Skills?

Early literacy skills in young children are the fundamental skills they need in order to start reading and writing.

Early literacy skills are all encompassing:

✩ phonological awareness

✩ print awareness

✩ letter recognition

✩ vocabulary skills

✩ comprehension

✩ listening skills

✩ fine motor skills

✩ narrative skills

✩ early writing skills

Let’s even throw in language skills! 

I know what you might be thinking…

… this list of basic literacy skills is LONG!

Parents, caregivers and teachers can all help early childhood ages with these skills by providing a print-rich environment, engaging in conversations, reading regularly and offering activities that promote phonological awareness.

But don’t worry! I’ve got some super simple and fun ideas below that will take no time and barely any supplies to start implementing TODAY!

Starting with the  Kindergarten Literacy Games Pack  for some of my very favorite early literacy activities!

Phonological Awareness Activities for Kindergarten

What is phonological awareness exactly?

Phonological awareness  means being able to recognize and manipulate sounds in spoken language. The sounds that make up a word are also called  phonemes . There are actually 44 phonemes in the english language! It involves skills such as understanding rhyming, blending, segmenting and understanding the different sounds in a word.

There are many different ways to work on phonological awareness skills in kindergarten. Let’s look at some fun activities below to use with children to help improve their literacy skills !

1. Syllable Scoops (FREE ACTIVITY!)

Syllable Scoops

This fun little game is for 2-4 players. Each player will need ten small objects such as mini erasers or pom-pom balls for their “ice cream.” Students will draw a card, count the syllables and cover up an ice cream cone with that number.

Other than that, just print, cut, and you’re ready to play and have fun! We typically used this game during math centers in kindergarten!

free literacy activity for kindergarten

You can download the Syllable Scoops game for free! Just add your info below and it will be sent straight to your inbox.

2. Read Picture Books

As I stated above, reading books to kids sets up a strong foundation for making them both better readers and writers.

Set aside a read aloud time in your classroom; I always liked to do this right after lunch time. If you are a parent and looking for literacy ideas at home, read your child’s favorite story to them at bedtime or right when they wake up. Talk about simple words in the story to help them with vocabulary development. 

For example, if there is a tow truck in the story, point to it and label it for your child: “Ooh-I see a tow truck. I wonder where it’s going?”

3. Sing Nursery Rhymes

Nursery rhymes are another great way to easily sneak in a literacy activity in your day. Babies all the way up to kindergartners (and sometimes older) love nursery rhymes!

I bet you don’t even realize how many different literacy skills you can hit with singing nursery rhymes!

They help kids to understand rhyming skills, how to sequence a story because they usually have a beginning, middle and end, plus they also help with recall and memorization!

4. Street Signs & Environmental Print

Environmental print is all the words and signs that you see around you every day – like stop signs, store names and logos.

Think about the golden arches-kids know by a pretty young age that that is the sign for McDonalds. They may also recognize the environmental print for places like Wal-Mart, Target and Chick-fila. They are going to know the environmental print of the places they frequent the most often.

Make sure you are naming places as you drive by or even when in a building, simply point out the restroom or exit signs. These are all ways to practice reading and vocabulary words!

5. Magnetic Letters

Magnets are tons of fun! 

What’s even more fun?! Magnetic letters! Try the  Letter Magnet Cards  in your literacy centers and watch the engagement unfold!

You can also grab  tons  of magnetic letter activities to use in your kindergarten classroom first thing in the morning with  Morning Tubs ! There are a lot of awesome magnetic letter activities and early literacy activities for preschoolers and kindergartners to try!

literacy activity for 3 year olds

6. Introduce New Sight Words/ High Frequency Words

In preschool and kindergarten, young children start to be exposed to sight words to strengthen their reading skills. These may also be referred to as high-frequency words . These are simply words that kind of “break the rules” in the english language and maybe don’t follow a specific spelling pattern but are seen frequently in text. Words like: “is, the, saw, little, not” (just to name a few).

It’s important for students to master these types of words at a young age since they are seen in text so often so it will help students be more fluent in their reading as they grow older.

You don’t have to make sight word practice boring:

You can practice in a playful way such as writing them in chalk, rainbow writing or building with magnetic letters.

You could also try to  create sight word mini books  or have students  read and sort their sight words.

Plus-when you read books aloud to students, always point out the high frequency sight words while you are reading!

There are also tons of new sight word activities to use each month in the  Kindergarten Literacy Centers Bundle.

Recognizing rhyming words is a  basic level of phonological awareness.

Start by simply saying two words and having children tell you if they rhyme or not. 

For more ideas check out  43 Rhyming Activities for Kindergarten  from  My Teaching Cupboard  to start or try one of the fun literacy games from the  Kindergarten Literacy Pack   based upon the Science of Reading.

8. Practice Alphabet Letters at Bath Time

If you are a parent reading this, you know how fun bath time can be. Kids are silly, they usually have a ton of things to talk about and they want to play.

Bath time can actually be the perfect time to help children work on early literacy skills.

Use foam alphabet letters to help them distinguish the difference between lowercase letters and uppercase letters. You could just practice naming the letters, naming the letter sounds or putting the letters in order on the bath tile! So many opportunities here!

9. Make Letter Shapes Out of Play Dough

Most all children love play dough!

Why not take something that they are interested in and use it to help their learning?! 

Making letter shapes out of play dough is such fun way to work on  fine motor skills  too!

build playdough letters literacy activities phonics

10. Word Games

For this idea, you can really be creative with it and differentiate it to fit your classroom needs.

There are many types of word games you can play with kids to help their phonics skills:

  • Sight Word Bingo
  • Word Wall Relay: Students race to the word word wall and tap on the word the teacher calls out first.
  • Sight Word Pictionary
  • Sight Word Simon Says: Simon says touch the word “the” (have the sight word cards spread out around the room)

11. Go on a Scavenger Hunt

Going on a scavenger around the school is yet another neat idea for a literacy activity. Simply make the clues all having to do with phonics.

Check out some ideas for clues:

  • Find an object that starts with the letter B.
  • Find something that rhymes with bat.
  • Locate a book that has the word  is  in the title.

12. Literacy File Folder Games

Having some simple file folder games to pull for independent work or small group time is another really simple way to help younger children with phonological and early literacy skills.

I used these  Literacy File Folder Games  because they aligned with Common Core standards and there are 24 different games to choose from.

They range from upper and lowercase matching to beginning sounds, ending sounds and CVC words. This makes them perfect for differentiating within groups in your class!

literacy activities for kids file folder games

13.  Sound Sorting

This sorting literacy activity for kids is a great fine motor activity as well. Kids should cut the pictures out on each page and sort them under each letter, according to the sound they start with.

This activity keeps little hands busy and having fun as they color, cut and glue while learning! 

14. Everyday Activities

When you think about it, there are actually ways that we can practice literacy skills in everyday activities.

When a child is involved in pretend play, there are so many different ways that you can sneak in learning about phonological awareness:

Make him or her the chef of the kitchen and have them create a restaurant menu.

Write letters to friends and have your child deliver them as the mailman.

Play school and they can be the teacher.

When you take your child to places like the grocery store, look for letters and sight words within the store and on the products. Talk about the letters that the fruits and vegetables you are picking up begin with.

Take the child’s lead and go with their interests on this. It will make it more fun for them and they will want to continue playing longer and be more engaged.

15. Alphabet Songs

Singing alphabet songs are some of the main building blocks of literacy. The more your child is exposed to the alphabet, the better they will know it!

Try having the Alexa play the alphabet song while you are making dinner, sing it during bath time or sing it while you brush your teeth!

16. Labeling Everyday Objects

Labeling everyday objects is another great way to work on literacy development. This is especially important for really young kids like babies and toddlers. It’s important to constantly talk about what we are doing so that kids can help interpret what the meaning of a word is.

For example, if you are mopping the kitchen floor-say that out loud. I’m mopping the kitchen floor because it’s dirty. 

17. Alphabet Puzzles

Alphabet puzzles are another simple activity for kids during anytime of the day. Letter recognition skills become of utmost importance by the time kids enter kindergarten so they have the right tools for reading.

This set is one of my favorites!

18. Letters of the Alphabet Treasure Hunt

Print out some  alphabet letter cards  in advance. 

Hide the letters around the school or classroom in advance. (This is a great after lunch activity!) 

Explain to the class that they are going on an alphabet treasure hunt, and their mission is to find all the letters of the alphabet. They MUST work together to find all 26 letters!

Begin the hunt by providing the child with the first letter. You can hand it to them or give them a clue that leads to the location of the first letter. If you don’t want to give clues for this, you actually don’t have to. They know they are done when they have all 26 letters and that is the beauty of it so if you need a fun activity in a pinch-this could be it!

Once they work together to find all 26 letters, put the letters in order, practice the sounds of each and give them a prize! (a small sucker or special eraser will do! Keep it simple!)

magnetic letter phonics literacy activities

19. Tell a Short Story

A new activity to try is having your child or student tell short simple stories.

Encourage them to tell the family stories at home or do this as a class at school. Try to guide them to have a beginning, middle and end.

They don’t need to write the story down-they can just verbally tell you. They could also draw a picture for their story and then tell you about it.

20. Name Activities 

One of the most important life skills is for young kids to know their name, be able to spell their name and identify which letters are in their name.

Have students rainbow trace their name, outline each letter with stickers or spell their name with magnets to mix it up a bit.

21. Letter Bingo

Grab FREE Letter Bingo Cards from This Reading Mama!

22. Letter Hopscotch

This one is just like it sounds-your classic hopscotch games with letters on the board. For students that need the challenge, try putting sight words on the hopscotch board instead.

23. Salt Tray Writing

Sensory activities are the best! This is located in our  Kindergarten Literacy Bundles Pack .

salt tray writing activities for kids

24. Letter Sorting

I love a simple and timeless literacy activity and letter sorting is IT!

There are so many different good choices for letter sorting! You could have students do this in cut and paste form, making alphabet soup (aka-sorting letters into bowls with a ladle) or just a good old magnetic board. Try the  alphabet sorting mats  if you want!

The other reason I love this activity is because you can easily differentiate it depending on student’s needs:

-sort capital and uppercase letters

-sort vowels and consonants

-sort p’s, b’s and d’s

You can easily change this activity to make it look however you need it to!

25. Dab-it Alphabet Pages

Kindergartners love daubers! Use this to your advantage! They are perfect for keeping little hands busy, engaged and working on fine motor skills.

Use the dab-it pages from the Alphabet Fine Motor Pack and watch the magic happen in your classroom!

26.  Letter-Sound Coloring Pages

If you are looking for a quick and east no-prep literacy activity, simply print these 26 letter-sound coloring pages and watch the magic happen! Students will color the pictures on that page that begin with that letter. Kids stay really engaged and focused during this since their hands and minds are busy.

They work really great for morning work or literacy centers also!

27. Story Sequencing Cards

Sequencing short stories and events is a skill all kids need help with. You can print out pictures yourself or buy some sequencing cards for your home or classroom.

28. Play “I Spy”

Playing I Spy is honestly just a great game to help with vocabulary and comprehension. You can play this as a class or in the car with your child! That is the best part of I Spy- you don’t need anything at all to play!

29. Fingerprint Letters

This fine motor activity idea is from  Happy Toddler Playtime.

You’ll need a washable ink pad, paper and a marker. Start by writing large letters spread out on the paper. Then instruct your child to dip their finger on the ink pad and make fingerprints along each letter. This is a great way for little ones to start recognizing letter shapes even if they can’t quite trace with a pencil.

30. Alphabet Directed Drawing

Alphabet directed drawing is a unique way to let kids practice drawing, listen to directions and work on fine skills all while drawing things that begin with that letter of the alphabet.

31.  Make a Paper Tearing Alphabet Book

Yes every preschooler and kindergarten will probably make al alphabet book at some point in their school career. But have you ever seen a paper-tearing alphabet book?

Paper tearing is a wonderful fine motor exercise and has multiple benefits! It strengthens muscles needed for the tripod grasp.

It can improve coordination skills by working both hands at the same time. For this sweet book, simply give students a piece of colored construction paper and they will tear the paper into small pieces and glue it onto the picture that stands for that letter!

For example: A is for apple, B is for balloon, C is for carrot.

Paper tearing alphabet book for kindergarten

32. Create a Word Chain

This is a fun idea when you have about a 20 minute minimum block of time.

  • Start by writing a simple word on the whiteboard or paper (e.g., “cat”).
  • Explain to the students that you’re going to create a chain of words, where each word starts with the last letter of the previous word.
  • Ask the first student to come up and say a word that starts with the last letter of the word you wrote (e.g., “cat” ends with “t,” so the next word could be “turtle”).
  • Write down the new word.
  • Continue the chain, with each student adding a new word to the list.
  • If a student can’t think of a word, you can provide a hint or allow the next student to take their turn.
  • Keep the chain going until everyone has had a turn or until you reach a designated stopping point.

33. Word Family Books

This is a set of five word family books . Students will cut out CVC words and pictures and sort them onto the correct word family page. You can have students work on one word family at a time, or they can work on two or more.

34. CVC Word Games for Older Students

Check out some different options:

Short a CVC Word Games

Short o CVC Word Games

Short i CVC Word Games

Short e CVC Word Games

Short u CVC Word Games

cvc games for kindergarten

35. Try a Kindergarten Literacy Night at Your School!

Have students invite a family member to come up to literacy night with them to create  8 Make & Take Literacy Activities .

Hands-On Literacy Activities

For an entire bundle of hands-on literacy activities to use in centers for the school year, 

GRAB THE ENTIRE KINDERGARTEN LITERACY CENTERS BUNDLE!

You might also like...

hands on literacy centers for kindergarten

Hands-On Literacy Centers for Kindergarten

kindergarten sight word sentences

Sight Word Sentence Books for Kindergarten (Try a FREE one!)

alphabet coloring and tracing worksheets for kindergarten

Alphabet Coloring & Tracing Worksheets for Kindergarten

literacy activity for 3 year olds

Helpful Links

Learn more about, free planning guide.

Good Housekeeping

Good Housekeeping

15 Best Books for 3-Year-Olds

Posted: June 26, 2023 | Last updated: June 29, 2023

<p>Reading with your toddler can be a precious — not to mention educational — activity. It's a great chance to spend meaningful time together, broaden their vocabulary while having fun at the same time and inspire a lifetime love of reading. When your child hits age three, they are likely engaging more with the books in their room or at the library. Even though parents will be doing the actual reading out loud, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/milestones.html">3-year-olds will likely be able to</a> point to objects in a book, ask questions about the story and be able to listen for longer periods of time. </p><p>When you're looking for the <strong>best books for 3-year-olds, </strong>they are colorful, engaging and include lessons that will teach your child important and exciting facts about the world. And because we all know kids at that age love to read the same books over and over again, they're also adorable enough that parents won't mind when your child begs for "just one more story" at bedtime. </p><p>We've rounded up some of our favorite <a href="https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/life/parenting/g23644385/best-baby-books">board books</a>, picture books and books for toddlers, as well as award-winning reads that are sure to find a place of honor on your child's bookshelf. They make great birthday <a href="https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/childrens-products/g43644264/best-toys-gifts-for-3-year-old/">presents for 3-year-olds</a>, <a href="https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/holidays/gift-ideas/g27030821/best-preschool-graduation-gifts/">preschool graduation gifts</a> or a special treat for anytime your kid has earned a little something. </p><p>And once you've run through all the great books on this list, check out <a href="https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/life/entertainment/a41518916/good-housekeeping-kids-book-awards-2022/">GH's Kids Book Awards</a> for more favorites to suit any age. </p>

Reading with your toddler can be a precious — not to mention educational — activity. It's a great chance to spend meaningful time together, broaden their vocabulary while having fun at the same time and inspire a lifetime love of reading. When your child hits age three, they are likely engaging more with the books in their room or at the library. Even though parents will be doing the actual reading out loud, 3-year-olds will likely be able to point to objects in a book, ask questions about the story and be able to listen for longer periods of time.

When you're looking for the best books for 3-year-olds, they are colorful, engaging and include lessons that will teach your child important and exciting facts about the world. And because we all know kids at that age love to read the same books over and over again, they're also adorable enough that parents won't mind when your child begs for "just one more story" at bedtime.

We've rounded up some of our favorite board books , picture books and books for toddlers, as well as award-winning reads that are sure to find a place of honor on your child's bookshelf. They make great birthday presents for 3-year-olds , preschool graduation gifts or a special treat for anytime your kid has earned a little something.

And once you've run through all the great books on this list, check out GH's Kids Book Awards for more favorites to suit any age.

<p><strong>$12.69</strong></p><p>With two built-in activity wheels, there's lots of exciting objects of all shapes and colors to find in this innovative book. It's great for working on memory and observation, as well as fine motor skills, not to mention sturdy enough to read on the go. </p>

1) Turn Seek Find: Habitats by Ben Newman

With two built-in activity wheels, there are lots of exciting objects of all shapes and colors to find in this innovative book. It's great for working on memory and observation, as well as fine motor skills, not to mention, it's sturdy enough to read on the go.

<p><strong>$8.59</strong></p><p>If the mail carrier's arrival is the highlight of your toddler's day, they'll love this engaging board book. Sixteen flaps and a double gatefold at the end give your little one lots to discover. </p>

2) Mail Duck: A Book of Shapes and Surprises by Erica Sirotich

If the mail carrier's arrival is the highlight of your toddler's day, they'll love this engaging board book. Sixteen flaps and a double gatefold at the end give your little one lots to discover.

<p><strong>$7.01</strong></p><p>If there's a toddler out there who doesn't love fire trucks, we've never met them. This fun board book features steering wheel handles and interactive elements with a fun rhyming story that will hold their attention all the way through. </p>

3) Drive the Fire Truck by Dave Mottram

If there's a toddler out there who doesn't love fire trucks, we've never met them. This fun board book features steering wheel handles and interactive elements with a fun rhyming story that will hold their attention all the way through.

<p><strong>$14.49</strong></p><p>Eye-popping colors, bold shapes and a delightfully impish tale make this book's visual humor really sing, both for kids and adults because reading to your toddler should be fun for all involved. </p>

4) Maybe... by Chris Haughton

Eye-popping colors, bold shapes and a delightfully impish tale make this book's visual humor really sing, both for kids and adults because reading to your toddler should be fun for all involved.

<p><strong>$11.25</strong></p><p>Teach your toddler about the beauty of body differences with this adorable tale about a box turtle born without a shell who uses a cardboard box instead. </p>

5) The Box Turtle by Vanessa Roeder

Teach your toddler about the beauty of body differences with this adorable tale about a box turtle born without a shell who uses a cardboard box instead.

<p><strong>$19.46</strong></p><p>With so many ABC books out there, it can be hard to pick just one. This durable, chunky board book has raised and scooped-out elements to encourage your little one to explore the alphabet through a tactile, multisensory experience. </p>

6) TouchThinkLearn: ABC by Xavier Deneux

With so many ABC books out there, it can be hard to pick just one. This durable, chunky board book has raised and scooped-out elements to encourage your little one to explore the alphabet through a tactile, multisensory experience.

<p><strong>$6.70</strong></p><p>This exciting accordion fold-out book has plenty to discover, taking kids on a tour of the ins and outs of an airport train. It's chock-full of silly surprises, like vacationing penguins, glamorous movie stars and lots more.</p>

7) All Aboard! The Airport Train by Nichole Mara and Andrew Kolb

This exciting accordion fold-out book has plenty to discover, taking kids on a tour of the ins and outs of an airport train. It's chock-full of silly surprises, like vacationing penguins, glamorous movie stars and lots more.

<p><strong>$22.27</strong></p><p>Either as one of your child's birthday gifts or to teach them about birthdays before attending their first kids' party, this fun and colorful book is too cute for words. </p>

8) Happy Birthday to You! by Nicola Slater

Either as one of your child's birthday gifts or to teach them about birthdays before attending their first kids' party, this fun and colorful book is too cute for words.

<p><strong>$6.79</strong></p><p>Get ready for your kids to high-five everyone they meet once they get into this cute way to teach social-emotional skills. It's a great way to teach children who can be a bit shy how to navigate meeting new people. </p>

9) Hi-Five Animals! by Ross Burach

Get ready for your kids to high-five everyone they meet once they get into this cute way to teach social-emotional skills. It's a great way to teach children who can be a bit shy how to navigate meeting new people.

<p><strong>$7.99</strong></p><p>Show your 3-year-old that if they can dream it, they can do it with this inspiring book featuring 18 women, from writers to inventors, artists to scientists and other important trailblazers. </p>

10) Think Big, Little One by Vashti Harrison

Show your 3-year-old that if they can dream it, they can do it with this inspiring book featuring 18 women, from writers to inventors, artists to scientists and other important trailblazers.

<p><strong>$8.99</strong></p><p>Parents of picky eaters, this one's for you. Teach your kid easy-to-remember Spanish vocabulary as well as delicious new dishes with this celebration of food truck cuisine. </p>

11) ¡Vamos! Let’s Go Eat by Raúl the Third III

Parents of picky eaters, this one's for you. Teach your kid easy-to-remember Spanish vocabulary as well as delicious new dishes with this celebration of food truck cuisine.

<p><strong>$10.43</strong></p><p>For kids who are having a hard time adjusting to a move, a new school or other life changes, this imaginative adventure will help. It's a sweet story about finding new friends that grown-ups will love as much as their little ones do. </p>

12) Sunday Rain by Rosie J. Pova and Amariah Rauscher

For kids who are having a hard time adjusting to a move, a new school or other life changes, this imaginative adventure will help. It's a sweet story about finding new friends that grown-ups will love as much as their little ones do.

<p><strong>$12.99</strong></p><p>Welcome fall with this sweet story about adjusting to change while acknowledging the anxiety new things can sometimes bring. It's also a great introduction to the seasons, perfect for ringing in a new school year. </p>

13) The Leaf Thief by Alice Hemming and Nicola Slater

Welcome fall with this sweet story about adjusting to change while acknowledging the anxiety new things can sometimes bring. It's also a great introduction to the seasons, perfect for ringing in a new school year.

<p><strong>$8.98</strong></p><p>If that fish's face doesn't convince you to pick this one up, the rhythmically rhyming story and beautiful illustrations will. Reading about a fish who discovers that spreading "dreary wearies" isn't his thing will make even the most nap-deprived smile. </p>

14) The Pout-Pout Fish by Deborah Diesen and Dan Hanna

If that fish's face doesn't convince you to pick this one up, the rhythmically rhyming story and beautiful illustrations will. Reading about a fish who discovers that spreading "dreary wearies" isn't his thing will make even the most nap-deprived smile.

<p><strong>$5.36</strong></p><p>If you don't already own a copy of this classic, you owe it to your kid's bookshelf to pick up a copy. The board book version is sturdy enough for your toddler to read at home or to bring along on trips where a comfort object will make bedtime easier. </p>

15) Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown and Clement Hurd

If you don't already own a copy of this classic, you owe it to your kid's bookshelf to pick up a copy. The board book version is sturdy enough for your toddler to read at home or to bring along on trips where a comfort object will make bedtime easier.

More for You

Trump's trial is almost over — and everything is about to change

Trump's trial is almost over — and everything is about to change

Starbucks Coffee And McDonald's In Poland

First ever McDonald’s menu from 1940s had just nine items on it

(Sion Touhig/Getty Images)

Stephen Hawking once gave a simple answer as to whether there was a God

What Does It Mean When You See “SSSS” on Your Boarding Pass?

What Does It Mean When You See “SSSS” on Your Boarding Pass?

What Is the Average Height for Women?

What Is the Average Height for Women?

John Goodman: Anti-glamour 'Roseanne,' 'Conners' will be remembered for love, laughs

John Goodman: Anti-glamour 'Roseanne,' 'Conners' will be remembered for love, laughs

Wallet Payment Dollars

Social Security Early Payment to Go Out This Week

Tomato hornworm next to tomato

Get Rid Of Tomato Worms With A Common Kitchen Ingredient You Already Have

cruise-balconies-getty

What not to do on a cruise ship balcony

17 Beginner Mistakes Everyone Makes at a Steakhouse

17 Beginner Mistakes Everyone Makes at a Steakhouse

Homeowner takes contractor to court to pay the price for cutting down 250-year-old tree: 'The wheels of justice turn slowly, but they do turn'

Homeowner takes contractor to court to pay the price for cutting down 250-year-old tree: 'The wheels of justice turn slowly, but they do turn'

shutterstock_editorial_127810a.jpg

Sondra Locke, Clint Eastwood and the tragic disappearance of a Hollywood trailblazer

Nancy Silverton Says This $18 Kitchen Item Changed Her Life

Nancy Silverton Says This $18 Kitchen Item Changed Her Life

Shaquille O'Neal Reveals What He Told Angel Reese After WNBA Draft

Shaquille O’Neal Concerned By Karl-Anthony Towns’ Postgame Behavior

carnival_1_kl_111522

Carnival Cruise Line makes key comments on dress codes

80 Cheap & Easy Dinner Recipes So You'll Never Cook A Boring Meal Again

80 Cheap & Easy Dinner Recipes So You'll Never Cook A Boring Meal Again

Flight attendant explains why you should always throw a bottle of water under hotel beds

Flight attendant explains why you should always throw a bottle of water under hotel beds

Senate rankings: 10 seats most likely to flip

Senate rankings: 10 seats most likely to flip

From left, Sara, Jamie and Joseph Lafollette at their California home.

Home insurance was once a ‘must.’ Now more homeowners are going without.

Rod Serling in The Twilight Zone

The Forgotten '60s Sitcom That Kicked The Twilight Zone Off TV

  • Skip to main content
  • Skip to primary sidebar

Teaching 2 and 3 Year Olds

This post might contain affiliate links. Click here for more information . Thanks for visiting!

Literacy Activities

[print_gllr id=10605]

FREE CIRCLE TIME PLANNER!

Get your FREE circle time planner as a gift when you subscribe to my free weekly newsletters.

Here is my Privacy Policy

Success! Now check your email to confirm your subscription.

There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again.

IMAGES

  1. 20 Early Literacy Activities for Preschoolers

    literacy activity for 3 year olds

  2. Activities for 2-3 Year Olds

    literacy activity for 3 year olds

  3. Free Printable Literacy Worksheets

    literacy activity for 3 year olds

  4. Top Educational Activities for 3 Year Olds Your Child Will Love

    literacy activity for 3 year olds

  5. 40 early literacy activities for preschoolers

    literacy activity for 3 year olds

  6. Teach a two or three year old to read With Children Reading Learning

    literacy activity for 3 year olds

VIDEO

  1. Learn ABC, 123 , Colors And Shapes

  2. Learn ABC, 123 , Colors And Shapes

  3. Learn Alphabets, Numbers, Shapes, Colors, Phonics, Vocabulary

  4. FREE PRESCHOOL MATH Game: Fishy Sort! Learn sorting, matching, and number quantity recognition!

  5. Learn to Read

  6. Learn ABC Letter and Colors

COMMENTS

  1. 15 Early Literacy Activities for Kids (Toddlers & Pre-School)

    This can be done in many ways. It can be done finger painting on paper, it can be done making letters out of playdough, or you can set up a plate of sand, and kids can use their hands to practice letters. 5. Listening to stories. Listening to stories is another early literacy activity for pre-schoolers.

  2. 8 Fun & Easy Literacy Activities For Toddlers

    2-3 Years; Shop. Printables; Courses; More Resources. Practical Life Challenge; 10 Easy Montessori Activities; Select Page. 8 Fun & Easy Literacy Activities For Toddlers. Jan 7, 2019 | Learn & Play. ... Keep reading to discover some of my favorite early literacy activities for toddlers. This list has engaging activity ideas for toddlers of all ...

  3. Literacy Activities For Preschoolers: Games, Writing Practice, Puzzles

    These 61 literacy activities will help stimulate your child and lay a solid foundation for their future learning. Teaching your preschool students these valuable skills has many benefits, like supporting their cognitive development, improving their language development, supporting their creativity, and aiding their problem-solving skills. ...

  4. 10 Literacy Activities for 3-Year-Olds

    Literacy activities for 3-year-olds involve plenty of hands-on learning. One way to get started is to focus on the basics. Have your child identify letters, sounds, and words. You can do this by reading children's books together, writing out simple sentences, or playing word games. You can also try making homemade literacy materials, such as ...

  5. Literacy Activities for Toddlers & Preschoolers

    Here are a few literacy activities for toddlers and preschoolers that help little bookworms build skills…as well as a lifelong love for the written word. ... 11 Best Toys for 2-Year-Olds; The Best Toys for Your 3-Year-Old; The 9 Best Toys for Your 4-Year-Old; Share the article. Share via Email; Share on Pinterest; Share on FaceBook; Share on ...

  6. Engaging Reading Activities for Preschoolers and Kindergarteners

    Encourage a love of reading with help from our guide, which includes book recommendations by interest, tips for getting your child to read for fun, and much more. Plus, take a look at reading activities for 6- and 7-year-olds. Shop popular titles and learning kits for children ages 3 to 5 below.

  7. How to Teach Your 3-Year-Old to Read

    Help your 3‑year‑old learn to read with Reading Eggs! Reading Eggs is the multi‑award winning reading app that helps children aged 2⁠-⁠13 learn how to read. Designed by experienced educators, the fun‑filled program is the perfect way to build your 3‑year‑old's phonics and phonemic awareness skills at home. Free Trial.

  8. Engaging Literacy Activities for Preschoolers

    Preschool early literacy skills milestones are the framework for assessing whether a child is developing accordingly. Below, we look at the milestones for early literacy skills in preschool. 3 to 4 years old. Turns book pages one at a time, from left to right; Sits uninterrupted for longer stories; Scribbles; Draws; Recites complete phrases

  9. Brilliant Literacy Activities for Toddlers

    Find great ideas and suggestions for literacy activities for toddlers that are perfect for using at home, nursery or in all kinds of settings. Recently Viewed and Downloaded › ... 7 - 8 years old . Year 3 . 8 - 9 years old . Year 4 . 9 - 10 years old . Year 5 . 10 - 11 years old . Year 6 ...

  10. Literacy activities for children

    For a guide to books and reading activities that might suit your child, you can look at the following articles: Reading with babies from birth, Reading with toddlers: 12-18 months, Reading with toddlers: 18 months-3 years and Reading with preschoolers. Drawing and writing literacy activities

  11. 20 Best Language and Literacy Activities for Preschoolers

    Top 20 Language and Literacy Activities for Preschoolers. Every preschool teacher understands the power of creative and engaging activities in nurturing literacy skills in young learners. To spark your imagination and enrich your teaching toolkit, we've compiled a selection of tried-and-true activities. Read-Aloud Activities

  12. 25 Fun Literacy Activities for Preschoolers

    25 Fun Literacy Activities for Preschoolers. By Callie Malvik on 03/29/2021. This piece of ad content was created by Rasmussen University to support its educational programs. Rasmussen University may not prepare students for all positions featured within this content. Please visit for a list of programs offered.

  13. Emergent Literacy Activities for Preschoolers and Kindergartners

    As time goes on, I'll be sure to break the activities down by categories. That way you can find just what you're looking for. RHYMING ANCHOR CHART - A simple but effective way to introduce the concept of rhyming. Teaching Syllables with Simple Games - A collection of easy, no-prep syllable activities to try "on the fly".

  14. 35+ Preschool Literacy Ideas that are Perfect for Summer

    Have fun with this collection of summer literacy activities that can be done indoors and out! ... Sheryl Cooper is the founder of Teaching 2 and 3 Year Olds, a website full of activities for toddlers and preschoolers. She has been teaching this age group for over 25 years and loves to share her passion with teachers, parents, grandparents, and ...

  15. Language and Literacy Activities for Preschoolers

    June 2, 2022. Language and literacy activities for preschoolers is one of our favorite topics because developing language and literacy skills in your students offers a number of important benefits. It supports their cognitive development, improves their creativity, builds their language skills, helps improve their concentration and problem ...

  16. 20 Literacy Activities for Preschoolers Kindergarten Kids, & Toddlers

    This is a great way for your child to be exposed to a variety of vocabulary on a daily basis and help with their early literacy skills. 5. Puppets. Puppets are a really fun literacy activity for preschoolers. They are a great tool for oral language and can also be used for children to retell a favourite story. 6.

  17. Interactive Literacy Activities for 3 Year Olds

    1. The Importance of Interactive Literacy Activities for 3 Year Olds. "Welcome to the vibrant realm of interactive literacy activities, where the enchantment of words and tales comes alive for your little ones. These activities stretch beyond the fundamental skills of reading and writing.

  18. Toddler Lesson Plans

    I am so excited to be one of the authors of our themed toddler lesson plans! What you will get in each unit: 20 hands-on ideas that are play-based and build a variety of skills. Printable pages (for some of the activities) Book recommendations. Material lists, step-by-step instructions and full color photographs of every activity.

  19. Toddler Literacy Archives

    Literacy and Story Time Printable Packets; ... Fish Counting Activity for Preschool {Free Printable} This post might contain affiliate links. ... Welcome! I'm Sheryl Cooper, teacher of 2 and 3 year olds for over 22 years. Read more about me here! More Printables!

  20. 15 Best Learning Activities for Your 3 Year Old Preschooler

    Here are 15 activities for 3-year-olds that are both fun and educational: 5 Fun Developmental Activities for 3-Year-Olds 1. Recognizing Letters and Sounds. Learning activities for 3-year-olds are most fun when they are dressed up as family games, pretend plays, or become parts of our daily activities and observations.

  21. 35 Fun Literacy Activities to Help Kids with Reading

    Let's look at some fun activities below to use with children to help improve their literacy skills! 1. Syllable Scoops (FREE ACTIVITY!) Syllable Scoops. This fun little game is for 2-4 players. Each player will need ten small objects such as mini erasers or pom-pom balls for their "ice cream.".

  22. Activities for 2-3 Year Olds

    This post shares close to 40 easy, hands-on, learning activities for keeping 2-3 year olds busy learning & playing! These activities include sensory play, fine motor & gross motor skill building, color sorting, shape recognition, problem-solving skills, & early numeracy & literacy ac.

  23. 15 Best Books for 3-Year-Olds

    10) Think Big, Little One by Vashti Harrison. $7.99. Show your 3-year-old that if they can dream it, they can do it with this inspiring book featuring 18 women, from writers to inventors, artists ...

  24. PDF The reading framework

    Story times in Reception, year 1 and year 2 31 Section 3: Word reading and spelling 40 ... 2022 showed that the reading enjoyment of 8- to 18-year-olds was at its lowest level since 2005. 28. ... Activities such as painting, colouring, modelling, playing in the sand and water tray are ...

  25. Literacy Activities

    Welcome! I'm Sheryl Cooper, teacher of 2 and 3 year olds for over 22 years. Read more about me here!

  26. 26 May 2024

    26 May 2024 | Feast of the Holy Trinity 11:45 Novena to Our Lady of Guadalupe 12:00 PM - Holy Mass For your mass intentions, please fill out the form...