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drawing object lesson

  • Students will develop observational skills by closely observing a work of art and drawing objects from life.
  • Students will learn how to use a magnifying glass for observation.

Cognitive Development: CD-5

Cognitive Development: CD-15

  • Visual Arts
  • observation
  • Assessments
  • Background Info

Introduction / Warm-Up

  • Define the word observation for students. Talk about what senses we use to observe things. Discuss Still Life with Basket of Fruit . Ask students to identify that they see and describe the tiny details they observe in the painting.
  • Explain to students that this type of painting is called a still life . Ask them why it might have that name. Tell students that artists use observations to help them make a still life.
  • Tell students that they are going to make their own still life artwork today. They will practice drawing objects at their tables.
  • Students will use magnifying glasses to help them see even more. Explain that scientists and artists use magnifying glasses in their work to help them observe details.
  • Demonstrate how to hold and use the magnifying glass. Have the students practice using the magnifying glass by looking at their hand, shoes or clothing. Have students take turns looking closely at the painting using the magnifying glass. Talk about what they can see using this tool.
  • On watercolor paper cover of sketchbook demonstrate using the watercolor pencils to draw outline of objects from a still life. Tell them that we will be doing something very special on the cover of the sketchbook. Demonstrate creating a more “finished” drawing with a lot of filling in. Tell students that when their drawing is finished, we will use water to make their cover drawings into paintings! Demonstrate brushing water lightly over the cover drawing. Mention that the paper is stronger on the cover, so they can use water on it. But later, when they draw on the inside pages, they can only use pencils or colored pencils.
  • Ask students to go to their tables.  

Focus Activity Procedure

  • Ask students to hold magnifying glass up to the still life on their table to help find details.
  • Ask students to place magnifying glass/hand lens on table (teacher may elect to collect them at this point).
  • Ask students to begin drawing what they see on the cover of their sketchbook. Tell students they must draw quietly and carefully so they can be good observers.
  • Encourage students to look for the shapes and details of the objects they choose.
  • Reassure students that it is fine if their drawing does not look just like the object they are looking at- practice will help them become good artists!
  • Encourage student to fill in their drawn objects.
  • While students are drawing, circulate to talk with them about what they are carefully observing. Encourage students to look for simple shapes in the objects they are drawing. For example, the cover of their sketchbook is a rectangle. Where in the still life do you see a rectangle shape?
  • When students have completed the drawing, pause the class and ask the students to write their names on the cover as the artist that made that book.
  • Tell them that we will now turn their drawings into paintings like the demonstration. Explain that a tiny bit of water will make the pencil turn to paint- like magic! Students can use paper towels to dab up water puddles.
  • Pass out one tub of water per table with enough brushes and paper towels for each student.
  • Sketchbooks should be placed on a drying rack to dry when finished.
  • Clean up by placing all materials back in their containers.
  • Re-visit Still Life with Basket of Fruit . Ask students to compare how their observational drawings were similar and how they were different to the painting.
  • Ask students to share which object they liked to draw the most or the least. Ask them to explain why. How did the objects look different when they were viewed through the magnifying glass?  Did you like drawing the objects up close (through the magnifying glass) better? Why or why not?
  • Encourage students to closely observe the world around them and draw objects that they think are interesting.
  • Ask students to look for art all around them at home and at school!
  • Assess listening skills and ability to observe closely by asking recall questions during discussion of Still Life with Basket of Fruit .
  • Observe student work in process and in completion to assess if students have used observation skills.
  • Observe students’ use of magnifying glass/hand lens during lesson to determine their comfort level with using the tool and what level they are able to record what they observe.

magnifying glass/hand lens to share as group; magnifying glass/ hand lens per student

9x12 drawing paper sketchbooks with watercolor paper covers

non-toxic watercolor pencils

paintbrushes

cups for water

still life props (small objects to draw such as plastic food, legos, or anything simple, but interesting)

paper towels

Extension Activities for Teachers

  • Create an oversized classroom sketchbook out of construction paper or butcher paper. During transitions or for a quick art minute, invite students to practice drawing random objects in the classroom (this could also be a “popcorn” type drawing game). Have students take turns choosing what to draw. Label the objects and display the class sketchbook in the library.
  • Use the inside pages of the sketchbook and encourage students to continue practicing their observational drawing skills by sketching at center time or during times of the day.
  • Take paper and pencils outside on a nice day to make observational drawings of the school.
  • Make thematic sketchbooks. For example, have students create sketchbooks that relate to the literacy theme you are currently studying or a sketchbook that has pictures that start with the letter you are learning about that week.

Suggested Books for Classroom Library

Ehlert, Lois. Planting a Rainbow . Harcourt, 1988. [ISBN 978-0-15-262609-9]

Mayer, Cassie. Markets . Heinemann Library, 2007. [ISBN 978-1-40349-404-7]

McMillan, Bruce. Growing Colors . HarperCollins, 1994, 1988. [ISBN 978-0-7587-2664-3]  

drawing object lesson

Exotic seashells, carefully observed insects and fruits, and rare hybrids of flowers were elements of the seventeenth-century Dutch fascination with the natural world. An extreme manifestation of this curiosity was “tulipomania,” the folly of collectors spending huge sums to acquire individual tulip bulbs such as the one that produced the striped variety in this still life. The shells are depicted with such exactitude that they can be identified as species from seas off the coasts of the East and West Indies and Africa. These and the Chinese porcelain are evidence of the extensive trading sphere of Dutch merchants.

Van der Ast specialized in paintings of such objects, admired for their verisimilitude to nature as well as for the moral associations attached to individual motifs. For example, the painter frequently followed the convention of scattering tiny creatures and spoiling fruit in pictures as reminders of the transitory nature of life. The butterfly, grasshopper, and fruit exist for only a brief span. The fading beauty of the cut flowers reinforces this idea, but like the shells, they may have offered criticism on the practice of squandering money on objects of curiosity. Interestingly, the fruits and flowers appear together although they come from different growing seasons. Like many of his contemporaries, Van der Ast would have utilized studies that he later combined in his compositions.

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Drawing Academy

Drawing Lesson 4, Part 3 – How to Draw Objects

How to draw objects – still-life, video lesson description.

In this video part you will discover how to draw objects arranged in a still-life. This study is very useful in understanding how to draw simple geometrical objects and how to render light and shade on their surfaces.

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Geometrical Objects Drawing – Still-life

In this video part you will find out how to draw objects arranged in a still-life. The still-life will consist of four simple geometrical objects: a sphere placed in the foreground, a cube on the left hand side, a cone that is standing on top of the cube, and a hexagonal prism on the right-hand side.

How to Draw Objects

With extreme approximation, a human head can be perceived as a sphere, hands and legs as cylinders, a nose as a prism, and so on.

In this “How to draw objects” video lesson, I am drawing this imaginary still-life from my imagination. There are no real geometrical objects arranged in front of me. As an imaginary drawing, this is a very good exercise in depicting what I know and imagine rather then what I see.

How to Draw Objects - Vladimir London

In this “How to draw objects” lesson, there will be a cone, standing on top of the cube. A cone has a circular shape at the base. In perspective, this circle will appear as an oval. When it comes to how to draw objects like a cone, please consider the following.

When drawing an oval, make sure it has rounded sides. There are no sharp angles in a circle and therefore, no pointed sides in the oval.

The next item in this “how to draw objects” lesson will be a hexagon. The hexagon is a plane figure with six straight sides and angles. This video will explain in details how to draw such intricate object like a hexagon.

Many organic objects around us can be represented as spheres. A sphere will always appear as a perfect circle regardless of the point of view. As for any circle, it is handy to draw at least two perpendicular axes first and then measure the circle’s radius, and make marks around the circle center. So, next time when you think how to draw objects with organic shapes, remember the sphere shape, you might find many spherical surfaces in organic objects.

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Art Prof

Drawing Basics TRACK

The Drawing Basics Track is a great way to learn fundamental skills in drawing . You’ll develop versatility in drawing by practicing everything from a two minute gesture drawing to drawings that take several hours to complete!

Ongoing Lesson 1 • Lesson 2 • Lesson 3 Lesson 4 • Lesson 5 • Lesson 6

Samuel Joshua Madriaga

A broad range of subject matter is spread out in the track as well, providing opportunities to expand your visual vocabulary.

Clara Lieu, Bread Fairy Drawing, banner

Do the track at your own pace! Taking the time to process the content is important, and so we don’t advise putting pressure on yourself to finish the track quickly.

Remember to have fun and enjoy the process of learning.

Drawing a Male Portrait in Soft Pastel, Clara Lieu

Show us what you make!

Mixed Media Acrylic Painting, Lauryn, banner

  • Post in  our Discord .
  • Tag us  on Instagram  with  #artprofshare.

Ongoing Assignment

Ideally, this ongoing assignment is to be done simultaneously with the weekly assignments. However, if your schedule doesn’t fit well with this, and you want to do the ongoing assignment at a separate time than the weekly assignments, our suggestion is to do the ongoing assignment for 3 weeks straight.

The continuity is important, so any time that you can draw daily for 3 weeks is great.

drawing object lesson

Draw for at least ten minutes daily in your sketchbook. Draw anything you want!

drawing object lesson

Complete six hours total of drawing. Using a timer do two, five, and ten minute animal figure drawings.

drawing object lesson

Complete six hours total of drawing. Using a timer do two, five, and ten minute human figure drawings.

drawing object lesson

Draw a set of twelve diverse thumbnail sketches of “scenes” you observe in your living space.

drawing object lesson

Choose a manmade object, or an object from nature that has visible texture. Create a drawing that emphasizes the texture.

drawing object lesson

Draw a self-portrait using a mirror, in any black and white medium. Set up so that your face has dramatic chiaroscuro lighting.

drawing object lesson

Experiment with wet charcoal techniques, then create a drawing based on a landscape image from our reference photo collection on Flickr.

Pencil Portrait Drawing, banner

  • Submit your track artworks here .
  • We’ll feature your artwork in a live stream !
  • We’ll add you to our student galleries .

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Prompt Create an 18" x 24" wet charcoal drawing, using a landscape reference photo as…

drawing object lesson

Prompt Complete six hours in total of gesture drawings of human figures. We recommend that…

drawing object lesson

Prompt Choose a manmade object, or an object from nature that has visible texture. Consider…

drawing object lesson

Drawing from Observation ( lesson plan )

Students will create still life drawings of everyday objects in their classroom in a small sketchbook they will keep for recording their observations.

Artwork Related to this Lesson

Still Life with Basket of Fruit

Still Life with Basket of Fruit , by Balthasar van der Ast

Student Learning Objectives

  • Students will develop observational skills by closely observing a work of art and drawing objects from life.
  • Students will learn how to use a magnifying glass for observation. 

Assessments

Lesson resources, related content.

Introduction / Warm-Up

  • Define the word observation for students. Talk about what senses we use to observe things. Discuss Still Life with Basket of Fruit . Ask students to identify that they see and describe the tiny details they observe in the painting.
  • Explain to students that this type of painting is called a still life . Ask them why it might have that name. Tell students that artists use observations to help them make a still life.
  • Tell students that they are going to make their own still life artwork today. They will practice drawing objects at their tables.
  • Students will use magnifying glasses to help them see even more. Explain that scientists and artists use magnifying glasses in their work to help them observe details.
  • Demonstrate how to hold and use the magnifying glass. Have the students practice using the magnifying glass by looking at their hand, shoes or clothing. Have students take turns looking closely at the painting using the magnifying glass. Talk about what they can see using this tool.
  • On watercolor paper cover of sketchbook demonstrate using the watercolor pencils to draw outline of objects from a still life. Tell them that we will be doing something very special on the cover of the sketchbook. Demonstrate creating a more “finished” drawing with a lot of filling in. Tell students that when their drawing is finished, we will use water to make their cover drawings into paintings! Demonstrate brushing water lightly over the cover drawing. Mention that the paper is stronger on the cover, so they can use water on it. But later, when they draw on the inside pages, they can only use pencils or colored pencils.
  • Ask students to go to their tables.

Focus Activity Procedure

  • Ask students to hold magnifying glass up to the still life on their table to help find details.
  • Ask students to place magnifying glass/hand lens on table (teacher may elect to collect them at this point).
  • Ask students to begin drawing what they see on the cover of their sketchbook. Tell students they must draw quietly and carefully so they can be good observers.
  • Encourage students to look for the shapes and details of the objects they choose.
  • Reassure students that it is fine if their drawing does not look just like the object they are looking at- practice will help them become good artists!
  • Encourage student to fill in their drawn objects.
  • While students are drawing, circulate to talk with them about what they are carefully observing. Encourage students to look for simple shapes in the objects they are drawing. For example, the cover of their sketchbook is a rectangle. Where in the still life do you see a rectangle shape?
  • When students have completed the drawing, pause the class and ask the students to write their names on the cover as the artist that made that book.
  • Tell them that we will now turn their drawings into paintings like the demonstration. Explain that a tiny bit of water will make the pencil turn to paint- like magic! Students can use paper towels to dab up water puddles.
  • Pass out one tub of water per table with enough brushes and paper towels for each student.
  • Sketchbooks should be placed on a drying rack to dry when finished.
  • Clean up by placing all materials back in their containers.
  • Re-visit Still Life with Basket of Fruit . Ask students to compare how their observational drawings were similar and how they were different to the painting.
  • Ask students to share which object they liked to draw the most or the least. Ask them to explain why. How did the objects look different when they were viewed through the magnifying glass?  Did you like drawing the objects up close (through the magnifying glass) better? Why or why not?
  • Encourage students to closely observe the world around them and draw objects that they think are interesting.
  • Ask students to look for art all around them at home and at school!

Written by Andrea Saenz Williams and Angela Lombardi

  • Assess listening skills and ability to observe closely by asking recall questions during discussion of Still Life with Basket of Fruit .
  • Observe student work in process and in completion to assess if students have used observation skills.
  • Observe students’ use of magnifying glass/hand lens during lesson to determine their comfort level with using the tool and what level they are able to record what they observe.

magnifying glass/hand lens to share as group; magnifying glass/ hand lens per student

9×12 drawing paper sketchbooks with watercolor paper covers

non-toxic watercolor pencils

paintbrushes

cups for water

still life props (small objects to draw such as plastic food, legos, or anything simple, but interesting)

paper towels

Extension Activities for Teachers

  • Create an oversized classroom sketchbook out of construction paper or butcher paper. During transitions or for a quick art minute, invite students to practice drawing random objects in the classroom (this could also be a “popcorn” type drawing game). Have students take turns choosing what to draw. Label the objects and display the class sketchbook in the library.
  • Use the inside pages of the sketchbook and encourage students to continue practicing their observational drawing skills by sketching at center time or during times of the day.
  • Take paper and pencils outside on a nice day to make observational drawings of the school.
  • Make thematic sketchbooks. For example, have students create sketchbooks that relate to the literacy theme you are currently studying or a sketchbook that has pictures that start with the letter you are learning about that week.

Suggested Books for Classroom Library

Ehlert, Lois. Planting a Rainbow . Harcourt, 1988. [ISBN 978-0-15-262609-9]

Mayer, Cassie. Markets . Heinemann Library, 2007. [ISBN 978-1-40349-404-7]

McMillan, Bruce. Growing Colors . HarperCollins, 1994, 1988. [ISBN 978-0-7587-2664-3]

Balthasar van der Ast ( artist )

Balthasar van der Ast was a Dutch Golden Age painter. He is best known for...

Still Life with Basket of Fruit by Balthasar van der Ast ( work of art )

An oil painting of a basket of fruit on a brown wooden table, with insects crawling in and around the basket. A bowl of lemons and crustaceans is on the left side of the table, and scattered pieces of produce, bugs, and flowers are depicted in the foreground and on the right side of the table.

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RapidFireArt

Lesson 3: Going From 2D to 3D

How to Draw Form and Volume 3D

At the end of this lesson, we’re going to revisit our homework assignments from the previous 2 lessons and apply the techniques from lesson 3. If you haven’t read and applied what you learned in lesson 1 and 2, I encourage you to visit them before you read on.

Lesson 1: How to Sketch

Lesson 2: learn to see things differently.

Drawing in 2D vs 3D

How in the world can we draw something that looks 3D, while in reality being flat on the page?

What Makes Drawings Look 3D?

Many factors contribute to this. I’m only covering a few in this lesson and will sprinkle more in the following lessons.

The image below shows you 2D objects being transformed into 3D. I added some shading for you to visualize it better.

How to Draw Form_3D objects with shadows

It’s easy to draw 3D objects when they have obvious vertices or hard edges , but what about weird shapes like circles, blobs, or even people? How do you define the planes/faces on a round object? That’s where contour lines come in.

Contour Lines

The first row of objects below appear completely flat. You could say they each have one face.

How to draw 3D shapes_Contour Lines

In the second row, the objects have lines wrapped around them which make you visualize their many sides. These lines are called contour lines  because they follow the form of the object. Contour lines can run in any direction along the surface of an object to help you create the illusion of form, giving the object a more meaningful shape.

When to Use Contour Lines

Here are some examples of when you can make use of contour lines.

Drawing Faces:

If you’re drawing a character whose face is tilted, contour lines will act as guidelines to help you find out where to place features on the face, such as where to draw the eyes, nose and mouth. Notice how the eyes on the cat in the second row wrap around the face more naturally. The nose and mouth are also aligned properly down the center of the face compared to the first cat.

2D vs 3D cat sketch example RFA

Here’s a more obvious example – a creature with 6 eyes:

How to Draw Contour Lines and Eyes_ spider example

Use your imagination to think of where you can make use of this technique. Perhaps a belt around Santa’s large stomach, a ring around a finger or a headband around someone’s head.

Defining Surfaces

Contour lines can be used to accentuate curves. Observe how the lines used in the examples below make a big difference in how the subject is perceived: Full lips versus flat lips. The more curved my lines are, the more plump the lips appear to be.

drawing object lesson

Here’s an example of a flower. When you look at the flower on the right, the stripes of each petal are curved. The curves follow the shape of each petal.

Flower contour lines example

When Should You Draw in 3D?

The short answer is: whenever possible.

First of all, whether you’re drawing a transparent or opaque object, you’ll want to approach it the same way. As a beginner, it’s always a good idea to draw all sides of the object. This practice will help you improve accuracy, so you can draw objects that make more sense.

Using the toy car example below, drawing the entire object in 3D helps me know where to draw each wheel instead of guessing where they should go.

2D vs 3D Car example

How to Draw in 3D

Since this lesson is an introduction to 3D, I want you to focus on only a few things to begin with.

Drawing Objects with Vertices and Hard Edges

This is the quick and simple method because it doesn’t account for perspective (something I will cover in lesson 6):

Steps: Draw a simple shape with corners, duplicate that shape, draw lines to connect the vertices together and then shade the object.

Tip: If you draw your second shape lighter than the first, it will appear further away.

How to draw 3D objects step by step_edges and vertices

For shapes with round edges, draw your connecting lines at the outer-most edges. If you size your shapes differently like the example below, it will give your drawing an added layer of depth. However, as mentioned above, this freehand method is quick but not very accurate compared to what we’ll be learning in lesson 6.

How to Draw 3D Round Edged Shapes Examples

For cylindrical shapes like cups, jars, pop cans and vases, you can use the method below: Draw your 2D object and then add ellipses to the top, bottom and/or sides.

How to Draw Cylindrical Objects

By changing the diameter of your ellipses, you can tilt your cylindrical shape more or less, as illustrated in the example below:

How to draw 3d objects on paper ellipse size

This idea can also be applied to drawing faces. You can change the direction you want your subject to face by changing the diameter of each ellipse or ring.

In the image below, assume that the sphere in the center is facing straight towards you. The point at which the 2 rings cross is the very front of the sphere.

As you look to the left, each sphere starts facing more towards the left side. The opposite applies to the right side. If you want a character to look up or down, you can apply the same idea to the horizontal ring.

How to draw contour Lines

Drawing Irregular Objects

Contour lines help you turn irregular 2D shapes into 3D. You can influence the way a viewer perceives your drawing by manipulating its contour lines. However, this process comes with some practice. If your contour lines do not accurately represent the shape you are drawing, for example, a sphere, your viewer will not perceive a sphere.

Here’s an example of how contour lines can manipulate your perception. I’ve shaded each object to better illustrate what I mean. Contour lines + shading make a powerful pair!

How to Draw Using Contour Lines _ Circle Example RFA 4

Tip: If your lines curve near the edge of your object, it makes the viewer think there is more on the other side, which magically lifts the object off the page.

drawing object lesson

A series of narrow rings will give you a pebble-like form, while a series of wide rings will give you a wider, rounder form. Here are some examples of what I mean. For each shape below, I’m showing you the front of the shape and the side view.

drawing object lesson

The ability to draw good contour lines takes a lot of visualization and practice. Once you understand it, it’ll be one of the greatest tools in your toolkit!

Summary of the Above

  • You can make things look 3D by indicating that your subject has multiple planes.
  • Use contour lines for irregular objects like circles, blobs, etc.
  • Always sketch in 3D. Your final drawings will look more accurate.
  • To draw a 3D object with vertices: draw 1 shape, duplicate it, connect the vertices and then shade it.
  • To draw irregular shapes such as spheres or blobs: use a series of contour rings.

Your Homework for the Week

Your assignment for the week is to take a look at your drawings from lessons 1-2 and recreate as many drawings in 3D or incorporate contour lines in them if you haven’t done that already. I’ll be submitting my left-handed homework to facebook . You’re welcome to share your homework on there as well :)

A great way to practice drawing contour lines is to grab a newspaper, magazine or a few pictures off the internet and draw over them! If you want more examples, head over to Google Images and search for “object wireframe” or “animal wireframe” etc and study the images. You can use them as reference while you practice drawing contour lines.

If you want to try a more difficult exercise, check out these cool pictures here . Try creating forms using only contour lines. Here’s a simple tutorial you can use to draw a hand:  http://www.handimania.com/diy/3d-handprint.html

This week’s challenge: Turn 15 2D objects into 3D sketches. These objects can be anything from apples, chairs, milk cartons to light bulbs. Submit your drawings to the RFA Facebook page and I’ll feature your artwork below! Each transformation must have a 2D column and 3D column similar to the example below:

drawing object lesson

If you’re waiting for the next lesson, sign up to my special mailing list in the sidebar or follow me on facebook !

Update: Click here for lesson 4

Readers Who Completed the Challenge!

Kevin Stockard

drawing object lesson

Manjistha Rawat

drawing object lesson

Darlene created RFA In 2013 with the goal of sharing simple yet detailed drawing tutorials with other artists on the world wide web. She is a self taught pencil portrait artist and Youtuber.

Related Posts

THUMBNAIL How to Sketch for Beginners 324x235 3

Lesson 4: How to Draw with Accurate Proportions

56 thoughts on “lesson 3: going from 2d to 3d”.

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I’m an ameteur in drawing so much movie characters and with this tutorial i can get even better. THANKS A BUNCH DARLENE!!!!

' src=

Thank you, I want drawing and found your website accidentally, you’re talented person and doing really amazing job. Thanks!

' src=

I’m eager to get started after reading your first few lesson assignments. I can do this! With your help of course! Thank you!

' src=

tks a lot! it helped!:)

' src=

I love your art work and how you explain the course step by step.

' src=

How did you draw the flower in 3d?

' src=

I just wanted to say THANK YOU. You are amazing. All your knowledge is extremely valuable and the fact that you share it with the world makes you a great human being. I am drawing thanks to you I can’t believe it!

' src=

I find your 2D to 3D is so easy to understand and follow. Thanks. I would like to use it in my lessons and if there are some good work can I ask them to sent to you. There seems to be a challenge of 2D to 3D is it?

' src=

Please teach me techniques of drawing portrait…my mistakes in drawing portraits can be identified but I don’t know how to change this mistake..Please help me miss

' src=

I’m learning so much from scratch and drawing is exciting! Your lessons are so simple and easy to understand. Thank You so much Darlene!

' src=

Thanks a lot for the awesome lesson!!

' src=

Thank you so much Your lesson is useful

' src=

HI MY NAME IS ACHYUTH I AM 17 YEARS OLD BY BEFORE I SAW YOUR WEBSITE I JUST DRAW ONLY CARTOON AND NORMAL DIAGRAMS AFTER I HAVE SAWN UR’S SITE AND YOUTE CHANNEL I HAVE LEARN SO MUSH THANK U ….☺️☺️☺️☺️👌👌👌👌👍👍👍👍

' src=

Well now your 18 and Im 17

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Studio in a School

Drawing an Object with Value

Students will use their understanding of value to create volume in a drawing of a round object.

Grade Level

Theme/Big Idea

Artists use value to create volume in their drawings. Volume is the appearance of space, or 3-dimensionality, in a drawing.

Essential Question

How can value create volume in a drawing?

  • Teaching Guide
  • Teaching Tools

Materials and Tools

  • Pencil, pen, or crayon
  • Paper or cardboard
  • Round object
  • Light source (lamp or window)
  • Value scale

Students will understand that:

  • Value describes how light or dark a color appears.
  • Value can create volume, or space, in a drawing.

Students will be able to:  

  • Use their understanding of value to create a drawing of a round object with volume.

Value can be used to create volume in a drawing. Volume is created when an object is drawn to look 3-dimensional.

In this lesson, we will draw a round object with a full range of value.

Step 1: Position a round object on a clean surface

A ball, piece of fruit, egg, or even a mug will work well for this drawing.

Place the object on a white surface to make the cast shadow more easily identifiable.

Step 2: Choose a light source

A light source is the place where light comes from when it hits an object. Here are some terms we’ll use to describe what we see when light hits an object.

  • Highlights are the areas on an object that catch the most light.
  • Mid-tones are areas with little highlight or shadow.
  • Shadows are the darkest area on the actual object.
  • Cast Shadows are the shadows made by an object.

The position of a light source changes the highlights and shadows on and around an object.

Look at the following examples:

When the light source is close to and above the lemon, the highlight is very large, and the cast shadow is very long.

drawing object lesson

When the light source is farther away and higher above the lemon, the highlight and cast shadow are smaller.

*Here the lightbulb icon indicates the light source.

drawing object lesson

When there are two light sources, there are two highlights and two cast shadows.

drawing object lesson

Ask students:

  • How does the size of a highlight change when the position of the light source is adjusted
  • How does the size of the cast shadow change?

Experiment with the position of a light source, moving the object if needed.

Step 3: Identify the values on and around an object

There is a range of values throughout this lemon and its cast shadow. Have students use a value scale to determine the values of the highlights, mid-tones, shadows, and cast shadows that they see on your object.

*The photo has been changed from color to black and white to make the values clear.

drawing object lesson

Highlight Mid-tones Shadows

Step 4: Drawing the object

Demonstrate slowly tracing the outline of your object with a finger. Then, lightly sketch the outline and cast shadow. Demonstrate filling the page with your drawing.

drawing object lesson

Demonstrate working from light to dark. Demonstrate lightly outlining the highlight before adding value.

drawing object lesson

Step 5: Adding mid-tone and shadows

Identify and add the mid-tone to your drawing. Demonstrate working in the direction of the contours of the object. Ask students how this is different from adding value in other directions.

drawing object lesson

Add the shadow to your object. Demonstrate continuing to add value slowly with layers of shading. Demonstrate shading in different directions. Ask students to observe how the value changes.

drawing object lesson

Ask students what values they notice in the cast shadow. Demonstrate matching the value of the cast shadow with the appropriate values on your drawing.

drawing object lesson

Describe how you’ll continue to add value and details to finish the entire drawing.

Have students set up their objects and light source.

  • Where is the highlight on your object? Can you see more than one?
  • Where are the mid-tones on your object? What value will best describe these?
  • Where does the shadow fall on your object? What value will best describe it?
  • What value or values best represent what you see in the cast shadow?

As students finish their drawings, ask:

  • Did you use a full range of value in your drawing?
  • Did you include all the details?
  • What surprised you when you looked closely at the values in your object?
  • What steps did you take to make your drawing?
  • What techniques do you think were most helpful to create volume in your drawing? Why?
  • How do you think using value can make your drawings more interesting in the future?

Volume, light source, highlights, mid-tone, shadow, cast shadow

Looking at the different ways that artists use value can inspire more ideas.

drawing object lesson

Giorgio Morandi

Kerry James Marshall

  • Which artists use smooth transitions?
  • How does it affect their drawing? Which artist’s work do you like the most? Why?

Student Examples

drawing object lesson

Drawing an Object with Value Written by Matt Mahler

Lesson Development Julie Applebaum, Senior Director Andrea Burgay, Associate Director

Studio in a School NYC Hasna Muhammad, Ed.D., Chair, Board of Directors, Studio in a School Association Alison Scott-Williams, President, Studio in a School NYC

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6 Observational Drawing Skills Art Lessons

drawing object lesson

Drawing from direct observation is a foundational and integral part of the artistic experience. Almost every art piece begins with a drawing. No matter what medium you are working in whether it be drawing, painting, printmaking, architecture, or 3D media-sculpture, mosaic or ceramics, drawings will be intertwined with the creative process.

Through learning observational drawing skills, students will learn to make compositional choices as well as accurately depict form, light and shadow. Direct observation lessons are vital for building hand-eye coordination skills and all of these lessons exercise this important skill.

Supplies EVERY Artist Needs to Draw:

drawing object lesson

Body Proportions – Wooden Mannequin Drawing

Lesson #1: Body Proportions – Wooden Mannequin Sketchbook Assignment

Lesson #2: Mannequin White Charcoal Project

Sliced and Diced Form Drawing

Draw the 6 Basic 3D forms: Sphere, Cylinder, Donuts, Cone, Pyramid, & Cube/Rectangular Prism. students will learn how to accurately “slice” through the forms to see inside them and render with full shading. They will then create a composition using cuts and slices of the 6 basic shapes.

  Small to BIG – Enlargement Drawing

High School Art & AP Studio Art Classes Breadth Enlargement Drawing

PVC Pipe Charcoal Drawing

Review drawing angles of lines, curved lines, and ellipses  using fluid motion swinging from the shoulder and elbow. Observe proportions  and points of view. Analyze angles of objects and the slants of the contour edges using the sighting techniques. They will learn how to construct a cylinder and use directional lines to draw PVC pipes accurately. They will use a pencil to check proportions and compare proportions of various PVC pipes within the still life composition.

Lego Drawings

High school art students used observational skills and knowledge of 2 point perspective to accurately draw a LEGO sculpture that they composed. There are two separate lessons that either used charcoal or colored pencils to render the drawings.

Lego Charcoal Drawing HS Art Lesson

Lego colored pencil drawing, sea shell pastel drawing.

The Sea Shell Pastel Lesson can apply to upper elementary art, middle school art, or high school art. Compose an interesting shell arrangement, practice observational skills and apply pastel techniques.

Oil Pastel Worksheet , Dry Pastel Worksheet , Charcoal Worksheet ,  Drawing Pencil Set Value and Shading Worksheet , Color Pencil Worksheet

If you choose to use this lesson or to repost it (written info or photos), please link it back to my blog. Create Art with ME .

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Sketching & Drawing Lessons

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Introduction: Sketching & Drawing Lessons

Sketching & Drawing Lessons

This Instructable will be slowly developing over a number of weeks 8 out of 10 lessons so Far

you may need to pop back to pick up new lessons.

9 out of 10 lessons complete - videos being added [these are embedded in the image sections at the start of each lesson]

  • Getting started - Lines, Points, Circles and Triangles
  • Look, Layout, Line, Shape, Shadow, Shine.
  • Overlap, Texture & Detail, Drop Shadow.
  • 1, 2 and 3 Point Perspective.

Basic Forms - Cuboids, Prisms, Cylinders (Ellipses), Cones and Spheres

  • Combining basic forms to create objects.
  • 2D USB Project [Something for you to try]
  • Orthographic Sketching (Engineering Drawing very basic)
  • 2D & 3D marker rendering technique - Basic
  • Colour Theory
  • Creativity - Exploration / Experimentation / Ideation
  • Advanced 2D & 3D Sketching Techniques *Started

Coming Soon :

  • Marker rendering, working on coloured paper and other enhancemets

I meet a lot of people in my job who say 'I wish I could draw like that' and they're surprised when I say 'Ok, I can teach you if you want'.

We often assume that drawing is a talent, something we are born with, some people can do it, some people can't.

But this is isn't exactly true; I failed my 'O'Level Art when I was 16. [don't get me wrong I'm not complaining I failed because I wasn't very good] and I didn't draw anything for a few years, why would I? I wasn't very good. To paraphrase a famous quote 'You don't know you are no good at something you enjoy doing, until someone tells you.' If I didn't know I was no good I'd have probably kept going and kept getting better. A couple of years later doodling away I realised I loved sketching and drawing and I wished I hadn't stopped and so I set out to teach myself how to become good at something I'd always wanted to be good at. I ended up becoming a design technology teacher/lecturer and teaching perhaps a hundred plus students these techniques.

I'm going to share here my tips and techniques for developing design drawing and communication skills. I am going to start with some very basic exercises and work through to more advanced stuff but I'll be honest, there are no short cuts, no quick tricks and no fast tracks, there's only practice, practice, practice.

Good luck, I hope you enjoy this, and don't be afraid to share your work with others.

Step 1: Getting Started - Lines, Points, Squares, Circles and Triangles

Getting Started - Lines, Points, Squares, Circles and Triangles

Don't go out and buy loads of equipment - Buying the best football boots doesn't make you David Beckham!

You will need :

A ballpoint pen (any colour will do)

A piece of paper or An old envelope (This is what junk mail is really for - free paper)

The key to drawing at this stage is

Straight lines are actually very difficult to draw because the human body is made up of lots of pivot points.

  • Find your line - you will have a natural angle across your body with which you are comfortable. Now imagine wiping some crumbs off the table; look at the angle & direction of your hand, this is your natural angle.
  • Ghosting - hold you pen the way you would normally. Place your hand on the paper so that the edge of your palm is resting on the paper but the pen is not touching the paper(no other part of your arm should be resting anywhere). Now sweep the crumbs away [Just like Karate Kid - Wax On Wax Off] do this three or four times.
  • Now as you are sweeping let the tip of the pen lightly touch the paper.
  • Repeat this for a few minutes.
  • Now try and draw the longest straightest lines you can, see if you can space them the same distance apart each time. Turn the paper and make grids, just practice, practice, practice.

All drawings are basically lines or curves that start and stop at a certain point and once you can do that you are on your way to being able to draw anything.

  • Look at image.2 - re-create this series of points which get further and further apart.
  • Now using ghosting first draw imaginary lines between the points.
  • Now join the lines (it doesn't matter if you start a little early or stop a little late, this is sketching) image.3
  • Now you have some start and stop control fill your sheet with small groups of 5 lines each where the they are all of the same length - image.4
  • If you want to do lines in a different direction don't move your arm - turn the paper instead, this way you are still 'sweeping the crumbs' moving in a way that is comfortable to you.
  • You can extend this exercise by drawing SQUARES - draw two parallel lines, turn your paper through 90 degrees and draw two more parallel lines across the first two lines. Now practice, practice, practice.

Earlier I said the human body is made up of a lot of pivot points, so you would think drawing curves would be easy, it isn't, the curves even from your wrist point are usually two open to be of any use.

  • Write or draw the letter C. Do you start at the top and move down and anticlockwise or at the bottom and move up and clockwise. This is your natural 'tight curve' direction.
  • Draw a series of letter Cs - try drawing them a bit bigger than normal and then try drawing them the size of your fist.- image.5
  • Go back over your letter Cs but ghosting this time and instead of a C, complete the circle to the top but keep going round, ghosting a circle.
  • Let your pen touch the paper and sketch in the reminder of the C to make a circle. - image.6
  • Now forget the letter C and just ghost and then sketch a page full of circles. Practice, practice, practice.

Now get some fresh paper and just doodle away sketching and drawing lines squares circles and if you look at image.7 you can add in TRIANGLES. Have fun :)

Step 2: 2D Sketching - Look, Layout, Line, Shape, Shadow, Shine. 2D Enhancements

2D Sketching - Look, Layout, Line, Shape, Shadow, Shine. 2D Enhancements

In the previous lesson we looked at mark making, that it being able to control the marks we make on the page to achieve a desired line or shape. Now were going to explore a more deliberate practice in how to draw objects.

This section is divided into.

  • Look, Layout, Line, - Shape, Shadow, Shine,
  • Practice Element.
  • Enhancements - Overlap, Texture & Detail, Drop Shadows

This is not drawing from observation so we will not be trying to draw what we see but trying to construct a drawing from basic elements, points, lines, curves, squares, circles and triangles. We will start of with very very faint lines and slowly build up our drawing.

You will NOT need:

A ruler or straight edge.

An eraser or correcting fluid ( mistakes are good, we see the mistake, we learn from the mistake).

You will need:

A ballpoint pen (any colour will do, although black is better later on). An A4 piece of paper - landscape (long edge nearest you)

Something to draw - I'm using a head phone jack see image.2

Section 1 - Look, Layout, Line, Shape, Shadow, Shine (See Image 1)

The first thing we need to do is establish the overall proportions of the object on he page we need to LOOK at it carefully. I usually sketch ideas on the page about the size of a clenched fist, big enough for detail but leaving enough room to add other ideas.- Remember keep your lines light & faint.

  • Having looked at your object sketch a square/rectangle to outline the overall area of the drawing.
  • Sketch in any large defining features. See image.3 and image.4.

The next thing to do is to examine the object carefully for details and LAYOUT where these are in relation to other features and the overall form. - Remember keep your lines light & faint.

  • Using simple points, straight lines, curves and or circles - lightly mark in the features of the object. See image.5.

Once you have roughly marked out where everything is it is time to 'firm up' the drawing. We're going to go over the design again with a slightly heavier line marking out the outline and features we want to see on the object.

  • Using the same pen but going over more slowly and with a little more pressure LINE in the design outline and features you want to keep. See image.6.
  • Ignore any light construction lines these will not be noticeable against the dark LINES.

This type of drawing is known as ORTHOGRAPHIC -

SHAPE, SHADOW, SHINE.

We will be discussing light and shade in more detail in the next step, but to enhance your drawing it is possible to add a little shadow using a technique called cross hatching. Cross hatching is a techniques of using small parallel lines to create areas of tone. It is usually done at alternating angles, 45 degrees one way, then the other, then vertical and then horizontal. Each layer adds more ink and obscures more paper creating a darker and darker tone. See image .7 and image.8.

PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE (See Image 1 again for ideas)

See images 9 - 12

Don't worry if your drawings are scruffy, this is just the early stages, just keep going, it will get better - slowly :)

Section 2 - 2D Enhancement - Overlap, Texture & Detail, Drop Shadow. (See Image 13)

A drawing is basically an optical illusion that the artist or designer creates to fool the viewer into believing that what they are looking at is 'real' or at least resembles 'real' enough for them to think about the drawing a not the fact that it is on a flat piece of paper; some artists call this giving an image 'depth'. As a designer we can trick the viewer if we understand how their vision and their minds work together to create a perception of an object.

  • Look at and copy image 14, notice the three squares/rectangles overlap, they look like they are one on top of another. By 'Layering objects we create an illusion that the objects exist in a 3D space because they ' overlap '.
  • Look at and copy image 15, here we are using a few lines to create the illusion of texture and the little circles in the corners suggest screws or bolts, this is detail . This again meets the expectation of the viewers mind 3D objects have details we can see.
  • Look at and copy image 16, here we use cross hatch shading (image.7) to create the illusion that each layer is casting a drop shadow . Only 3D objects would cast shadows, so this again adds to the illusion.

Image 17, 18 and 19 show how shading can be used to create the illusion of light falling on a curved surface e.g. a cylinder. Image 19 explains in more detail. Light falls on the object and some light is reflected, where the reflection is directly back towards the viewers eye, the viewer will see a highlight ( Light ). Where the light starts to fall away from the line of sight, less light reflected means a darker tone is seen ( Medium ) and where light isn't reflected towards the viewer we have very little light seen meaning a darker tone still ( Dark ). So any representation of an object will need you to think about where the light is shining from and where the reflections are. In design we often simply this by assuming that light shines over the viewers left shoulder. Light from the Left.

So we have;

  • Drop Shadow
  • Light from the Left

And if we remember to apply this to all our drawings it will enhance the illusion of 3D, even if it is only an orthographic sketch. Images 20, 21 and 22 show these steps in action - notice the overlap is provided by adding a rectangle background which isn't quite big enough so that the object 'overlaps' the background.

PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE (See Image 1 and 13 for ideas).

Step 3: 3D Sketching - Perspective - Forms - Combining Forms.

3D Sketching - Perspective - Forms - Combining Forms.

Hopefully by now you'll be feeling a little more relaxed about your drawings - again don't be worrying about loose lines or scruffy scribbles this is all part of the learning process.

This section is divided into:

  • Perspective - 1,2 and 3 point
  • Sketching basic forms - Cubiods, Prisms, Cylinders, Cones & Spheres

Perspective.

One Point Perspective.

When you look down a road, or a rail way track (from the side not the middle !) you'll notice that the lines going off into the distance seem to move closer together (they converge ) and as they reach the horizon ( horizon line ) they meet and vanish ( vanishing point ), see image 2. This is how we see the world and how we measure visually the size and distance of objects. Image 2 is an example of One Point Perspective - that is one vanishing point at which some of the horizontal lines converge. It is a useful technique for interior design, see image 3, but it does have limitations when drawing smaller objects e.g. for product design.

Two Point Perspective.

I want to take you through drawing in two point perspective, look at images 4 - 8.

  • Image 4 - Sketch a Horizon Line all the way across you page about 1/3 of the way down.
  • Mark a dot at each end really close to the edge of the paper, these are your Vanishing Points
  • Draw a vertical line in the centre of your paper about 2/3rds of the way down about half the length of your index finger.
  • Image 5 - from the top of this line and again from the bottom very lightly sketch lines that go to the vanishing points - notice how they converge .
  • Image 6 - Now draw to more vertical lines [Be careful this is where some people make a classic mistake see image 7] and then from the top of each line again very faintly sketch a line to the OPPOSITE vanishing point.
  • you should have a sketch that resembles a cube image 8 - draw round the outline of the cube and maybe shade it if you want. Image 9

Three Point Perspective , is very similar except for step 5. Instead of two vertical lines these two lines converge on an imaginary vanishing point well below the bottom edge of the page, image 10 & 11 . This third point take into account that when we look slightly down on an object, parts that are further away will be every so slightly smaller.

We don't want to have to construct horizon lines and vanishing points every time so it is important to practice drawing cubes without the need to set up a complete construction. See images 12,13 and 15.

In the same way that a square formed the basis of our 2D drawings the cube is the basic form from which we can construct all other basic 3D forms an shapes and establish proportions in our 3D sketching se image 16.

3 point perspective cubes are hard, this is going to need a lot of PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE.

BASIC FORMS

The basic forms are the 3D shapes that act like the Lego bricks of drawing, once you have mastered the basic forms you'll be on your way to being able to draw almost anything. We have introduced you to the cube already but there are 4 other basic forms to learn.

Prisms - by this I mean triangle shapes rather than the true meaning of prism - a 2D shape extruded into 3D.

Cylinders - here we will have to explore ellipses in more detail first.

Cones - A combination of a pyramid (see Prisms) and a Cylinder base (see ellipses)

Spheres - Get practising those circles from step 1 and you'll need ellipses again here.

We're going to start by producing a reference sheet see image 17. A reference sheet is a practice sheet but it is also a sheet worth keeping which you can refer back to as you work on other drawings.

Start with Piece of A4 and fold it into five columns - see image 18.

  • In the first column at the top sketch and shade a cube - see images 19.
  • Now sketch a cubiod (rectangle square shape) below this cube [note how the two forms overlap] see image 20.
  • Now we add a drop shadow - here we imagine a light source directly above the cube shining down so that the cube casts a shadow on the rectangle cubiod below - see image 21 - use dark vertical tone lines close together to create the shadow.
  • Continue creating a stack of cubiods - watch your perspective lines though.

Notice how the light shading is represented on the upper faces by no tone, on the faces to the left by an open diagonal shading to create a medium tone and on the faces to the right by a close diagonal shading to create a dark tone. The drop shadow is a very close vertical shading to give that sense of coming down from above.

  • Prisms are based on cubes so we sketch cubes first and then layout the triangle elements on the cube's faces, the pyramids are constructed by adding a line from corner to corner on a flat face to find a centre point which is then joined to the opposing face corner. Note I have looked and layed out the column first, see image 22.
  • Now Line in and shape shadow and shine, image 23.
  • Now look at your overlaps and add drop shadows - you'll need to think a little about how the shadow would fall on a sloped surface but it doesn't have to be perfect, image 24.

Before we deal with cylinders we're going to have to go of on a tangent and deal with ellipses first and then we'll come back to cylinders.

Ellipses are notoriously difficult to sketch but once you understand them there are a number of tricks that can help you out. First we'll look at the structure of a ellipses and then we'll look at techniques to help us sketch them.

  • Image 25 shows a deconstruction of a circle. A circle fits inside a square where the edges f the circle touch the mid point of each edge of the square. see (1)
  • The edge of the circle also passes through a point under half way from the corner but over a quarter of the away. see (2)
  • This deconstruction can be reconstructed onto a 2D flat face square which has been drawn in perspective. see (3) Note that the ellipse unlike the circles even quarter shapes the ellipse has two sharper curves and two shallow curves - two sharp, two shallow.
  • Image 26 takes this a little further, note the shallows are on the minor axis (the short distance across the ellipse) and the sharps are on the major axis (the long distance across the ellipse). Also note the two axis should always be at 90 degrees to each other.
  • A common problem with ellipses are drawing the sharp curves two flat - watch for this in your early practice.
  • Image 27 shows a technique where by we draw a center line to represent the minor axis and then sketch ellipses free hand across this on the 90 degree major axis.

Ellipses are difficult, they are going to take a lot of PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE.

Cylinders then can be constructed using two ellipses drawn on opposites faces of a cuboid image 28.

  • Start with a Look, Layout of a number of cuboids, image 29.
  • Follow up with Line, image 30.
  • and then Shape, Shadow, Shine image 31 - Note the shading inside the cylinder is opposite to the outer shading.

Cones are a combinations of a pyramid style prism at the top and an ellipse at the bottom.

  • Sketch out a cuboid and use a cross from corner to corner on one face to find the center point. image 32
  • Sketch in an ellipse on the opposite face.
  • Carefully blend the lines from the center point into the edges of the ellipse, image 33

Spheres don't get there form from a basic construction they are inherently circular, they get there form from their shading, lines or details. Image 34 and 35 show the two main different approaches to illustrating a spherical surface, tonal shading or the use of elliptical lines across the surface. there is also an illustration of a hemisphere.

As with all of these exercises PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE.

Combining basic forms to create Objects.

These last few images show examples of how basic forms can be combined to create various different objects and really now what you need to be doing is analysing every object you see to identify the basic forms that make up the object.

Step 4: 2D - USB - Project - Something for You to Try.

2D - USB - Project - Something for You to Try.

I realise at this point that you may have been doing a lot of copying so now I want you to have a play and explore what you can do with your new techniques.

The Brief is :

You are a product designer and you've been asked by a Natural History Museum to design a USB data stick as a marketing tool for their new insect collection. It needs to show some connection / inspiration from nature, preferably insect based but it doesn't have to look like an insect, so it could just have a design or pattern on it, or it could just use elements of a part or shape you like. You need to produce 1 A4 design sheet of 4 or 5 ideas. Key elements are the USB connector is 12mm wide and needs at least 10mm clearance to go into the socket - see image 4.

I have completed an example sheet and I'll walk you through my process, but remember there's no right or wrong here, it's what ever works for you, works. Here are the images explained

  • This is the final sheet, so this was what I was aiming for. I usually have a vague idea of areas on the page and sort of work in the quarters to have a bit of a layout to work to.
  • I doodled this a couple of days ago with no idea it would be the inspiration for the project.
  • My first 2D LLL - I've added a second view and shown I'm thinking about function ( how will the lid work )
  • I like to sketch important dimensions just so they're in my mind while I'm designing.
  • I'm big on intellectual property and I checked USBee - it already exists, a company called relogik has one and it's a good design. No matter...
  • The internet is full of great ideas that I had, too late :)....So here I brainstorm / mind map / word associate.
  • I like the idea of 'data on the fly' and I like dragon flies so I start sketching from some research....
  • Internet images as research [shameless plagiarism I know]
  • Sketching a possible design.
  • A little look at a side view and finishing up the overall presentation of the idea.
  • I'm not loving my dragon fly so I go back to the mind map and look for other possibilities - a cocoon type pod thing and a honeycomb (stores nice things)
  • A snails shell, but more a pond snail than garden snail - I don't mind stretching the brief...a lot :)
  • Just playing with functionality.

If you don't like insects, just pick something else;

  • Park Life ( Yes the song - if you want to do a music inspired USB that's up to you )
  • Your Choice Listed Here...

THE MAIN THING IS HAVE FUN - REMEMBER THERE ARE NO RULES, IT DOESN'T HAVE TO WORK, ITS ONLY A SKETCH AFTER ALL, SO LET YOUR IMAGINATION HAVE FREE REIGN FOR A WHILE :)

Step 5: Orthographic Sketching (Engineering Drawing)

Orthographic Sketching (Engineering Drawing)

One of the reasons people are put off drawing up plans is that Technical Drawings / Orthographic Projections / Engineering Drawings can appear very very complicated. They are formal language that engineers use to communicate with each other but like any language used for communication once you understand a few words you can start to say what you want. This section is designed to give you some basic vocabulary to get you started.

Technical Bit :-

These concepts are drawn from the British Standards for Engineering Drawing for Schools & Colleges

You will Need :-

Some Squared Paper really helps at the beginning.

Image 2 - Shows some writing in capital letters, it is a good idea on all drawings to make notes and it is recommended that you use CAPITAL LETTERS to aid clarity. It also shows 4 of the 5 different sorts of line, unlike normal drawings, in engineering drawing the type of line carries with it a very specific meaning.

  • An unbroken dark line denotes the outlines / edges of an object.
  • An unbroken feint line denotes construction lines, projection lines and or dimension lines
  • A dashed line with the dashes all short and the same length denotes a hidden detail line e.g. being able to see inside an object (X-Ray Vision)
  • A dashed line with alternating long and short dashes (Chain Line) denotes a centre line, a path or a trajectory.
  • A chain line with two short dashes alternating with a long dash is used as an outline to denote the extreme position of part of an object if it moves, see image 6

Image 3 - Shows three views of a chair/car seat as an example object sketched in orthographic sketching. There are 3 views usually drawn, sometimes more and sometimes less depending on the amount of information needed to be displayed.

  • The main view or 'Front' elevation is usually drawn in the lower left corner of the sketch area to allow for the other views to be added around it.
  • The view sketched directly above lines up with the front elevation and represents a view looking directly down on the object from above, hence the name, 'Plan' view, as though looking at a map.
  • The view sketched directly to the right lines up with the front elevation and represents a view looking directly at that side of the object [Where the sides have different shapes/different features an additional view would be required on the other side]. This view is the side Elevation

Notice the feint projection lines from the original front elevation, the idea of orthographic engineering drawing is actually not to be as complicated as possible but to use the least amount of drawing to communicate the most amount of information.

Image 4 - Shows an object with its associated dimensions.

The process of describing an objects dimensions usually starts with some short feint construction lines coming off the object to be dimensioned (note there is a small gap between the object and the dimension line).

Another feint/construction line is drawn between these two lines and the ends of these lines are indicated with thin narrow arrow heads which touch the lines projected from the object.

Finally the dimension is indicated in clearly written hand writing - note the general rule is that the line underneath the number is the line being described by that number.

It is useful for the viewer to also clearly indicate if a scale has been used and if so what ratio and most importantly what system of measurements are being used e.g metric - millimetres, meters or imperial, feet and inches.

Image 5 - Shows a cross section through an object, a slice as though the object was cut in half and opened up along a line so the viewer can see inside.

The view shown with the diagonal lines is the 'Sectional View' and is labelled A-A the A-A denotes the plane of the line and the direction of the view from the main drawing. The diagonal lines are sketched at 45 degrees and can be used to indicate differing materials by altering the distance between the lines.

See the image to the right, note the thin line through the object with two dark end markers, the thin line is the plane of the section (where the cut was made).

The arrows pointing to the dark end markers indicate the direction of the view.

The Letters A and A indicate what the sectional view will be labelled else where in the drawing A-A.

Image 6 - In some objects there are components that might move and you may wish to show the extent and path of this movement, for this we use LOCI & Movement lines, see notes for image 1, 4 & 5.

The original object is drawn and the position of one extreme extent of the motion is therefore shown.

The alternate position of extreme extent is then drawn where the outline uses a double dashed chain.

An appropriate point on the object is selected and a centre line, long dash short dash, is drawn between the two positions of extreme extent.

Image 7 - Here is an example of orthographic sketching for a 'single egg' rack.

Image 8 - And here is that information translated into a 3D Isometric assembly diagram.

Image 9 - Another example of engineering drawing for a Pinhole Camera Aluminium Tripod Mount.

Images 10-12 - Pinhole Camera 35mm Film Carousel.

Image 1 - Don't take it too seriously :) but PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE.

Step 6: 2D & 3D Marker Rendering

2D & 3D  Marker Rendering

Markers are the preferred method for most product designers when not working digitally and so here is a basic introduction into the use of markers and some basic technique.

Water proof, pigment ink, permanent fine-line drawing pen. I prefer a thin nib 0.1mm

White Pencil Crayon (optional but useful)

White paint pen or white out (optional useful - can be temperamental be careful)

Cool Grey Number 2 marker (or closest equivalent)

Image 1 and 2 - Reference Sheets

Image 3 and 4 - You may remember the exercise we did from step 2, section 2, image 13 - this is a very similar exercise.

  • Sketch three overlapping squares/rectangles so they look like they are one on top of another. By 'Layering objects we create an illusion that the objects exist in a 3D space because they 'overlap'.
  • Use a few lines to create the illusion of texture and the little circles in the corners suggest screws or bolts
  • Here we use the cool grey number 2 marker to outline the lower and right hand side edge as though a shadow is being cast. Note that we have a number of levels here and so if you look very closely you will notice the fore most square (glass) casts a shadow on both the metal square and the wooden plank. Where the shadow is cast on the wooden blank it is a little thicker this is because the glass is further away from the wooden plank than it is from the metal. The thickness of the drop shadow indicates the distance away from the object the shadow is cast on.

You will see the drop shadow used a lot from now on to help objects/sketches etc. seem 'off the page' a little.

Image 5 - Light Medium and Dark shading - the advantage to using markers is that when you overlap the colouring of the marker on the page you get increasingly darker tones of the same colour. It is a bit like overlapping lenses from a pair of sunglasses - more layers = darker colour .

Image 6 - Here again we repeat the exercises from a step 2 but this time we use the cool grey number 2 marker to create tonal values for the shading to give shape and shine.

Image 7 - Here we are showing how shading can create indents into a surface like the LED readout or create raised surfaces like the button.

  • Sketch a rectangle within a rectangle.
  • Join the inner rectangle's corners to the outer rectangle's corners using short diagonal lines.
  • Using your cool grey number 2 shade one layer over the whole area covering both rectangles. This is your first layer - light.
  • Repeat this shading but try to miss out the bottom and right hand section of the spaces between the rectangles. This is the second layer - medium.
  • Now shade just the Left hand side and upper section of the space between the rectangles. This is your third layer - dark.
  • The numerals are drawn in using a fine-line drawing pen and then a drop shadow is added using your marker.
  • Reflection lines have been sketched across the inner rectangle to suggest a glass like surface.
  • White pencil crayon has been used to create highlights and lighten areas that are reflecting light.To c

To create a button the highlighted and shaded surfaces are reversed.

Image 8 - Here a single layer of marker has been put down and then a second layer used to add details such as a grill, small holes or bumps. Dark lines to the left and top cast shadows on the edges of the grill and holes while highlights are picked out on the right hand and bottom edges. The bumps are the reverse of this.

Image 9 - Here we have some examples of 2D coloured rendering technique which will be covered in more detail after we look at colour theory.

Image 10 to 16 - 3D Marker Rendering technique - Step by Step Basic.

  • Image 10 - A look and Layout of some overlapping cuboids.
  • Image 11 - First layer of cool grey number 2 all over each surface - light
  • Image 12 - Second layer on the vertical surfaces only - medium
  • Image 13 - Third layer on the vertical right hand faces (light comes from the left) - dark
  • Image 14 - Outline used to define shapes more clearly (no light reflected from outer edges)
  • Image 15 - Drop shadows rendered in.
  • Image 16 - Highlights on inner edges are added where those edges would reflect light.

Image 17 - Process repeated as an example in a different coloured marker.

Step 7: Colour Theory

Colour Theory

Now that we are looking at markers & rendering we need to develop an understanding of colour and which colours work well together and why.

There are well researched an published theories on colour but here I am going to just present some basic concepts and ideas.

Image 1 - When starting a project using a colour medium (medium = paint/marker/pencil) it is often an idea to do up a colour wheel using that particular medium. There are three primary colours ( hues ) often used in Art & Design but there are two ways of mixing colour.

  • Additive - This is where coloured light is mixed - Red, Green, Blue (RGB) and when added together, more light = white.
  • Subtractive - This is where colours are mixed as pigments on paper - Red, Yellow, Blue, and the more colour you mix the less light = black.

As we are working on paper mostly we will look only at the Subtractive Colour Wheel - Red, Yellow, Blue.

It doesn't matter where you start on your circle but I usually go for a clock face layout - with a primary colour at 12 o'clock, 4 o'clock and 8 o'clock.

This colour wheel is actually made up from cuttings from magazines. I've...

  • Yellow at 12 o'clock,
  • Blue at 4 o'clock
  • Red at 8 o'clock

In between those I have what I think is a 50/50 mix of the two primaries - a secondary so we have

  • yellow & blue giving us green at 2 o'clock
  • blue & red giving us purple at 6 o'clock
  • red & yellow giving us orange at 10 o'clock

I then have the secondary mixed with a primary to give a tertiary -

  • 1 o'clock - Lime
  • 3 o'clock - Aquamarine
  • 5 o'clock - Purple Blue
  • 7 o'clock - Mauve
  • 9 o'clock - Deep Orange
  • 11 o'clock - Sun Orange

These names are made up, you can call colour what ever you want (look at some of the names paint companies use :) ).

Image 2 and 3 - Here's another wheel and a set of tests for a different project but here I want to introduce a couple more concepts. Colours can be chosen that work well together or compliment each other. These are usually opposite each other on the colour wheel. Colours next to each other on the colour wheel are said to be harmonious . Colours in the red to yellow area are often described as being warm colours while the blue green colours are said to be cool, see image 4 . You can choose two harmonious colours to work with their compliment this is known as a split-compliment, see image 5. Image 6 shows us tones which we are already familiar with from our shading and shadows practice but we can modify basic colours, by adding white they become tints and by adding black they become shades . The use of a tint with a shade where they are of their complimentary hues is known as discord, see image 7 and 8 .

Image 9 and image 10. - Here is another quick colour pallet prior to drawing out some seasonal sketches.

  • spring - yellows & greens moving towards a warmer summer pallet
  • summer - warm yellow orange moving towards autumn shades
  • autumn - orange & reds moving towards cooler blues of winter
  • winter - tints of blue moving towards pale yellow green of early spring

Try some colour wheels and pallets of your own, explore & experiment with combinations to see what works and more importantly what doesn't.

Step 8: Creativity - Exploration / Experimentation / Ideation

Creativity - Exploration / Experimentation / Ideation

Isn't it frustrating when you ask creative people how they do it and they say they don't know. And if they don't know how they're doing it they can't tell you how you can do it....frustrating.

You can do it.

It is a lot like learning to sketch and draw though - it takes...PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE.

What you are actually trying to do is to teach your mind to work in a way which is different from how it is used to working and this is very difficult but there are some tools and tricks out there that can help you.

First I'll talk you through SCAMPER which is a nice technique for playing with initially but also can be a powerful creative thinking tool, then I'll talk in more detail about creativity and how to develop other techniques.

Section 1 - Scamper

Image 1 & Image 2 - These are examples of a technique which is loosely based on SCAMPER. Scamper is a sort of mnemonic of letters that can be used to stimulate creativity. There is an 'official version' but here I use a very much modified approach.

I had to separate these out so I'll look at SCAM first then PER.

Each Letter can be applied deliberately in order, one after the other, preferably with no real goal in mind - just do it because it is the next step to follow and be open to what happens.

Image 3 - SCAM

S - Size, Scale - Explore your sketching by zooming in and out, re-scale & re-size elements of the sketch.

C - Cut, Chop, Carve, Connect, Combine, Collect - Explore elements by cutting & or combining elements in different ways.

A - Adopt, Adapt - This is about looking around and adopting shapes/ideas and adapting them to suit.

M - Modify, Morph, Mangle, Mush, Mash, Mirror - Take elements and re-shape & re-form them.

Can you see how we're just using the letter to create action words which prompt us to 'do' something 'random' to create new concepts/ideas/shapes/forms with no real 'control'.

Image 4 - PER

P - Pierce, Punch, Poke - Add Holes, Groves, Indentations

E - Extend, Extrude, Eliminate - Stretch elements, make 3D forms though extrusion, remove obvious elements.

R - Rearrange, Revolve, Rotate, Remove, Reverse, Reflect.

The great thing about this form of SCAMPER is you can just keep adding words and keep playing with shapes and forms until you see something you like.

Images 5 - 9 - Exploring and Experimenting MP3s / Kettles / Task Lights

Section 2 - Creativity

There are many great thinkers out there who have struggled with explaining this, I am not one of them but I do know what works for me and what has worked for my students and what may work for you.

I have done a lot of reading and it boils down to...

Having an open mind. Don't judge an idea (it's just a sketch remember it doesn't have to work - it doesn't even have to be sensible) Edward De Bono has some fantastic writing on lateral & creative thinking and I take from him the idea of PO - a provocative operation - forcing thinking by deliberately choosing to try and think differently hyPOthesis, supPOse, POssibility. What if cars had no steering wheels? What would you get if you thought about penguins & the education system? How would a kettle with no handle function?

This seems like odd behavior but it frees up the mind from preconceived notions and so allows exploration and experimentation without worrying about what other people think - we worry a lot about that - but if we only did what other people thought possible we'd never have had cars, trains, planes etc. don't be afraid to suggest silly ideas and more importantly really explore them.

Creativity is about (hippy alert ) achieving an altered mental state - shifting perception to allow the exploration and experimentation which might lead to a new concept or idea. How do you think about something that doesn't yet exists until you think it?

Here are some other concepts / ideas / thoughts on creativity.

Aleatory Techniques - Introducing randomness into the process -

Creative Problem Solving Process

Russian TRIZ

Edward De Bono

You may have had fun with the SCAMPER but I'm guessing you are probably still left thinking 'Yeah but this doesn't make me creative, I still struggle for ideas...'

There used to be a comedy show - 'Whose line is it anyway' - in the show the comedians had to improvise a play using a random object they had been given and they got points for the most different ways of 'seeing' that object. Creativity in part is not a 'doing' thing as much as a 'seeing' thing.

Here's the PRACTICE -

  • Most words can have more than one meaning e.g. set - set things out, concrete sets, a collection of things....look for these additional meanings where ever and when ever you can.
  • Like words objects can have more than one use, try to start to think about objects and consider possible alternative uses (you don't have to start combing your hair with a fork) it's just a thought experiment.
  • Be deliberate in your thinking. Suppose....What if.......If this was here.......If that didn't exist.......If this could just......If that went........

You cannot defy the laws of physics.....but you can bend them a little :)

Step 9: Advanced 2D & 3D Sketching Techniques

Advanced 2D & 3D Sketching Techniques

Hopefully you've had time to practice and develop your technique. This section is about adding subtle layers to your technique to enhance the quality of your sketching. We're going to cover quiet a number of techniques so I'm going to break this down into the following : -

  • Simple Rounds

Complex Rounds

Casting Shadows

Simple Rounds.

Nearly every object has rounded edges, there are very few objects that have perfectly sharp corners. Look around you and see these rounded edges and notice the highlights that they reflect.

Image 2 - Look & Layout a 2D & 3D grid for the corner [you may remember how we analysed a 2D circle when we worked on ellipses in lesson 3 this is the same sort of thing - a corner in 2D is usually a quarter circle and in 3D it will form part of an ellipse]

Image 3 - Line in the outer edges of your round.

Image 4 - Cross hatch shading is used to define the shapes not the position of the highlights on the round.

Image 5 - Some Practice Images

Image 6 to 11 - Practice Exercise - Design a reading station.

Complex rounds...are, hence the name - we effectively have three simple rounds (count them three!) all meeting at one point and this gets tricky especially when you start thinking about the other 6 visible corners you're likely to get.

Carboard Cartoonist

Image 12,13,14 - here we see the developement (Look, Layout, Line) of the front corner. Note that the corner is effectively a quarter hemisphere, and each other corner will have another part of the overall sphere as corners. The last image here is just emphasising the difficulty in shading these curved edges.

Carboard Cartoonist

Image 15,16,17 - Here we look at sketching and shading a cubiod, you have to think very carefully about where the light is falling on these curved surfaces - this is easier with markers than it is with cross hatch shading.

  • You will need.
  • Fine-Liner 0.1
  • White Pencil
  • Marker Cool Grey No2.

If you look at this image you'll see I have drawn a sort of lamp post for the my light source and this lamp post generates two sets of parallel lines. One line goes from the base of the lamp post through the first {closet} corner and out the other side for some distance. Each subsequent base corner has a line moving away from the light source parallel to this first line.

This is repeated with a line from the highest point of the lamppost.

Where the lines from the base corners and the lines from the top corners meet is where those corners would cast a shadow to. There area can then be shaded.

Carboard Cartoonist

There is a video to illustrate this embedded, see the images at the beginning of this section - sorry there's no voice over yet.

There are three more video clips which practice the above techniques using white pencil for highlights on a brown envelope [use the inside of the envelope, it has a better texture].

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Hand Contour Drawing

Hand Contour Drawing Lesson

Hands are a tough subject.  My students eyes get wide when I say we are going to focus on drawing hands from life. This hand contour drawing unit requires tons of guided practice and lot’s of encouragement along the way.

Hands are a great subject matter because they are so approachable, easy to come by, and are an incredible tool to communicate ideas, emotion and mood.  You can say so much with your hands and students can explore a fundamental skill while learning to use their artistic voice.  Students will be challenged, but it is a subject that builds so much confidence after disciplined practice. 

contour drawing progression

Hand Contour Drawing At a Glance:

YouTube player

If you prefer a video over a blog post, this video will walk you (and your students) through everything I will outline in this blog post. It is classroom and Canvas ready!

Hand Contour Drawing Inspiration

Before there was Pinterest, there was the Incredible Art Department.   You could search for lesson plans by topic and media that hundreds of  art teachers generously shared.  When I was student teaching in 2008, my cooperating teacher showed me the website and I was so relieved scrolling through a wide range of lessons. There was a hand drawing lesson posted by Dave Haines that grabbed my attention as a first year high school teacher. 

Using his student’s results as inspiration, I taught contour drawing to my first ever batch of Art I students, and to my amazement and relief, they absolutely excelled.  I have tweaked and used this lesson to focus on observational drawing and given students the theme of communication throughout the years. 

What is Contour Drawing?

This video will walk you through each of the three types of contour drawing:

YouTube player

This video specifically focuses hand contour drawing:

YouTube player

Contour drawing is a fabulous technique to build confidence, develop observational skills and help students simplify objects to their basic shapes and lines.  I truly believe this is the most helpful way to help students learn to draw, and I still use contour drawing in my sketchbooks all the time!  Many students have their own style and perception of what objects look like, and this is a disciplined approach at looking at objects as they actually are.

My husband is a painting professor at a University in Oklahoma, and he views the practice of looking as a form of meditation. He often has his students draw blind contours for extended periods of time without any talking, music or any distraction besides looking with your eyes and letting your hand create what it sees.

Although my high school students have a hard time doing anything without distractions, you can hear a pin drop the first few exercises of contour drawing. The collective emotions of students finally looking at their paper is palpable. I LIVE for these moments in the classroom.

This technique is great for all ages, not just high school.  These images are from my Art II students (a mix of 10th-12th grader who allegedly took Art I). I have successfully taught this to Art I and even Sculpture I students before we made wire portraits.

YouTube player

I loved teaching this to my former 6th graders and the results were VERY similar to what my high school students created.

Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain by Betty Edwards is a classic for this technique and many others. It helps break down drawing into manageable steps. I love that it has been continuously revised.

drawing object lesson

Blind Contour Practice in the Classroom

We start by doing guided practice with blind contour drawing.  I set a timer for two minutes and they change their hand position each time.  Many students will not be finished by the two minute mark, and many students will be very annoyed that you are timing them at all.  I continuously remind them how important it is to slow down and focus on what the eye is actually seeing.  Think of your pen as an extension of your eye- it moves around the object in tandem.

drawing object lesson

Blind contour drawing always creates laughs because…the drawings look like you aren’t looking at your paper!  There will always be the student who just can’t let go of accuracy and tries to pretend they weren’t looking.  I’ve seen teachers put up folders or have something to block their hand, but I just trust that students will commit to the concept.  Disappointment is a part of life I’ve accepted.

Modified Contour Practice

We move on to modified contours where students can look at their paper a little at key transitional moments in the drawing.  They should still look at their subject 90% of the time.  The drawings still look wonky, but there will be more of a realism since they can check their work a little.  Placement and size will become slightly more accurate. I remind students that their drawing  looking like a perfect hand is still not the goal.  Practicing hand eye coordination, pure observational drawing and letting go of preconceived notions of their subject is the goal. 

Hand Contour Drawing Practice

Finally, we move on to contour drawing.  Students can check their paper more often, maybe 80% of the time, but still rely on drawing while looking at the subject.  I like to do a three minute timer for our guided practice so they can slow down and really focus on the details.  Students will try to pick up their pen to capture their wrinkles and knuckles, and I have to continuously remind students that it is one continuous line capturing the outer edges of their hand.

drawing object lesson

This is where I really see confidence grow.  They have been looking at their hand for a class period and a half at this point (I teach 45 minute classes) and they are typically happily surprised at their results.  I encourage them to try a hand gesture that challenges them, it may turn out better than they think.  A good way to challenge more advanced students is to have them hold something in their hand and add that to their drawing.

Hand Contour Drawing on Final Paper

hand contour drawing artwork

Once we have practiced, we move on to our final paper.  Students are most comfortable drawing their hand gestures in pencil first (contour style, of course) and then outlinelining them in Sharpie.  These Sharpie pens are great, and don’t leave little ink blots when you hesitate in your drawing. 

Sharpie Pens - Black, Fine Point, Set of 4

I really like this paper from Blick Art Materials because it has a great texture and does not fade.

Pacon Tru-Ray Construction Paper - 18

***This post contains affiliate links to products I truly love and use in my classroom. If you use these links to buy something I may earn a commission at no additional cost to you.  Thank you for supporting this public school teacher’s side hustle so I can continue to provide free content.

Some students like to look at American Sign Language to create meaningful pieces. Students also like to create hand gestures that communicate ideas and emotions in combination.  I love when students add creative details to the backgrounds and add some signature style to their observational drawing.

Once they have the five (or more!) hand gestures they are happy with, they cut them out and arrange their compositions on a second piece of paper.

hand contour drawing artwork

Hand Contour Drawing Results

hand contour drawing

I am always blown away by the results. They are beautifully drawn and communicate so much. My favorite part of the whole experience is seeing students confidence grow as their drawing abilities noticeably improve. There is also stress involved, but the end results are always a powerful evidence of learning.

Art History Connections

My classes do daily bellwork focusing on the Feldman’s method art criticism. I pick an artwork that highlights the topics we are covering in class.  With contour drawing, Pablo Picasso is a natural fit with his simplified line drawings .  It’s fun to look at a detail (you know, the nudity and all) of  Michelangelo’s The Creation of Adam .  It’s SUCH a famous image and students can interpret very easily and thoughtfully.  I also love to throw in Cueva de las Manos (Cave of Hands) to discuss why humans create art and how hands can be such a powerful subject matter.  There are many more contemporary and less famous artists that use this style in their work as well.

This blog post details the daily art history warm-up procedure, and you can download my Cave of Hands discussion powerpoint for free!

Art History Warm-Ups

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Sierra machado.

HI! My name is Sierra Machado and I am an art educator in Oklahoma. This is a creative space dedicated to the craft of teaching and art making. My goal is to inspire young artists, encourage and support fellow art educators and to push myself to create more art. View all posts by Sierra Machado

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IMAGES

  1. Sketching & Drawing Lessons : 9 Steps (with Pictures)

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  2. Pin by Baji Babu on drawings

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  3. Products and perspective (2)

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  4. Lesson 6: An Introduction to Drawing Everyday Objects

    drawing object lesson

  5. High school art lessons, High school art projects, Art lesson plans

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  6. Easy Object Drawing With Pencil Shading

    drawing object lesson

VIDEO

  1. Drawing Object Show Characters Day 193

  2. Object Drawing part 1

  3. Basic drawing lessons for beginners How to draw object drawing easy for beginners with BASIC SHAPES

  4. How to draw Object Drawing ( Earbuds)step by step

  5. Object drawing easy for beginners with pencil

  6. object drawing #ajay arts#youtubeshort #shortvideo

COMMENTS

  1. Lesson: Drawing Everyday Objects

    Choose familiar objects found in the classroom or brought from home. Divide a large piece of drawing paper (18 x 24 inches) into six rectangles of the same size. (You can also use six pieces of regular paper [8.5 x 11 inches].) Start at the upper left and draw the still life six times.

  2. Lesson 3: Drawing an Object from Observation

    Today we will be making another drawing from observation by analyzing the shapes of an object. View the Drawing from Observation video to learn how to approach observational drawing in a new way. Step 2: Selecting an Object, with Student Slides #2-3 (5 minutes) The first step to making a drawing from observation is deciding what to draw.

  3. Drawing: From Observation to Imagination

    Artists both draw what they see and express what they think. This unit focuses on translating the world around us into drawing, through developing skills and techniques for observational drawing and through learning how to use the elements of art (line, shape, texture) to express our own ideas. Grade Level. 6-8.

  4. Lesson 5: Drawing from Observation

    Step 3: Drawing from observation, with student slides #6 - 10 (15 minutes) Now, let's get ready to begin your drawing. Put your object in front of you where you can clearly see it. Try positioning your object in a few different ways and choose the most interesting position to draw.

  5. Drawabox Lesson 6: An Introduction to Drawing Everyday Objects

    You can find the full lesson here: http://drawabox.com/lesson/6, but don't forget to complete lessons 1 and 2 (the basics), as well as lesson 3, 4, 5 and for...

  6. Learn to Draw Online: Step by Step Drawing Lessons by Dennis and Nolan

    Day 5: Pencil Drawing Transfer Techniques - When you work from a reference image (a photo, picture from a magazine, etc) you'll need to "transfer" that image onto your drawing paper. In this lesson Nolan shows you 3 easy ways to transfer a reference image onto your drawing paper that don't require any special equipment or elbow work.

  7. Drawing from Observation

    Demonstrate brushing water lightly over the cover drawing. Mention that the paper is stronger on the cover, so they can use water on it. But later, when they draw on the inside pages, they can only use pencils or colored pencils. Ask students to go to their tables. Focus Activity Procedure.

  8. Drawing Lesson 4, Part 3

    In this video part you will find out how to draw objects arranged in a still-life. The still-life will consist of four simple geometrical objects: a sphere placed in the foreground, a cube on the left hand side, a cone that is standing on top of the cube, and a hexagonal prism on the right-hand side. When it comes to a topic of how to draw ...

  9. Drawing Basics TRACK · Art Prof

    The Drawing Basics Track is a great way to learn fundamental skills in drawing. You'll develop versatility in drawing by practicing everything from a two minute gesture drawing to drawings that take several hours to complete! OngoingLesson 1 • Lesson 2 • Lesson 3Lesson 4 • Lesson 5 • Lesson 6 A broad range of […]

  10. Drawing from Observation

    Student Learning Objectives. Students will develop observational skills by closely observing a work of art and drawing objects from life. Students will learn how to use a magnifying glass for observation. Define the word observation for students. Talk about what senses we use to observe things. Discuss Still Life with Basket of Fruit.

  11. Pencil Drawing Class: Mastering Object Sketching and Shading

    If you have DO eraser, you can also do that. I mean, we can do this erasing with your eraser. Now, after we have lightened our sketch, our primary sketch, we are going to start to shading 3. Beginning of sketching and shading of the paper bag: Now, the texture of fabric or paper, we are going to use faded sheets.

  12. One Point Perspective Drawing: Step by Step Guide for Beginners

    Step 1. As always establish the horizon line and vanishing point. You'll probably find it easiest if you draw the shape of the building's frontal plane. In one point perspective this is simply a flat shape. The large rectangle above will serve as the front (closest) side of the building.

  13. Lesson 3: Going From 2D to 3D

    Steps: Draw a simple shape with corners, duplicate that shape, draw lines to connect the vertices together and then shade the object. Tip: If you draw your second shape lighter than the first, it will appear further away. For shapes with round edges, draw your connecting lines at the outer-most edges.

  14. Drawing an Object with Value

    In this lesson, we will draw a round object with a full range of value. Step 1: Position a round object on a clean surface. A ball, piece of fruit, egg, or even a mug will work well for this drawing. Place the object on a white surface to make the cast shadow more easily identifiable. Step 2: Choose a light source

  15. 6 Observational Drawing Skills Art Lessons

    Sliced and Diced Form Drawing. Draw the 6 Basic 3D forms: Sphere, Cylinder, Donuts, Cone, Pyramid, & Cube/Rectangular Prism. students will learn how to accurately "slice" through the forms to see inside them and render with full shading. They will then create a composition using cuts and slices of the 6 basic shapes.

  16. Art Lesson: 1, 2, and 3-Point Perspective

    People across the world seem to have a difficult time grasping the concept of perspective drawing. Hopefully these lessons will help people understand one, two, and three point perspective. Although these lesson are at the high school level, most students still have a difficult time grasping the concept. Because of this, a more difficult one-point perspective lesson is presented first.

  17. Sketching & Drawing Lessons : 9 Steps (with Pictures)

    Turn the paper and make grids, just practice, practice, practice. POINTS. All drawings are basically lines or curves that start and stop at a certain point and once you can do that you are on your way to being able to draw anything. Look at image.2 - re-create this series of points which get further and further apart.

  18. Hand Contour Drawing

    There was a hand drawing lesson posted by Dave Haines that grabbed my attention as a first year high school teacher. Using his student's results as inspiration, I taught contour drawing to my first ever batch of Art I students, and to my amazement and relief, they absolutely excelled. I have tweaked and used this lesson to focus on ...

  19. Everyday Object Doodling

    This is an oft-imbued mantra in our art classrooms as our students explore the potential of the pencil mark on a piece of paper or the swipe of a paintbrush across a canvas. Nurturing and protecting the creative spirit has become even more important as we work through this unprecedented time, when students are removed from the creative enclave ...

  20. Basic drawing lessons for beginners How to draw object ...

    Basic drawing lessons for beginners How to draw object drawing easy for beginners with BASIC SHAPES....how to draw objects for beginners...simple pencil draw...

  21. PDF Lesson Overview/Objectives Key Ideas That Connect to Visual Arts Core

    exploration of human figure drawing Lesson5 LESSON OVERVIEW/OBJECTIVES This lesson introduces the art of figure drawing by studying shape and form. Students will learn about and draw ... Explore the design possibilities of a 3-D object by examining views of it from many angles. Objective 3: Handle art materials in a safe and responsible manner. ...

  22. Object Lessons

    Object lessons also cater to various learning styles. While some students excel in visual learning, others may grasp concepts more effectively through tactile experiences. The use of objects accommodates diverse learning preferences, ensuring that each student has an opportunity to absorb and retain information in a way that suits their ...

  23. The Drawing Lesson (The J. Paul Getty Museum Collection)

    The Drawing Lesson; about 1665; Jan Steen (Dutch, 1626 - 1679); Oil on panel; Unframed: 49.2 × 41.2 cm (19 3/8 × 16 1/4 in.); 83.PB.388 The J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles ... Researching the collection is a core component of our work, and we continue to improve object descriptions, document object histories, add bibliographic references ...