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Primary and secondary students with hearing loss to get more help in designated schools

designated schools hearing loss

SINGAPORE - Students with hearing loss will receive more support from designated schools, said the Ministry of Education (MOE) in a statement on Tuesday (Sept 20).

Having a designated mainstream primary and secondary school will allow students with moderate to severe hearing loss to study and play alongside their mainstream peers in and out of class, said the MOE.

Starting next year (2017), Beatty Secondary School will take in Secondary 1 students with moderate to severe hearing loss who use sign language. It will replace Balestier Hill Secondary - one of the schools that does not have a Secondary 1 cohort this year (2016) and Boon Lay Secondary School as the designated secondary school for these students.

There are currently fewer than 15 students with hearing loss who use sign language in the two designated secondary schools.

In its statement, MOE said: "With a small number of these students, locating them in a single designated secondary school will provide students with a greater sense of community, with more opportunities for mutual communication through signing, social interactions and peer support. This will also allow better pooling and strengthening of specialised resources within one location."

At the primary level, from 2018, pupils with hearing loss will also be admitted to a designated primary school located in a central location. Currently, they attend either the Lighthouse School or the Canossian School, which are Special Education schools.

These designated schools have teachers trained to support students with hearing loss, in ways such as sign interpretation, social emotional support and help in the use of assistive technology devices, said MOE. The ministry will also continue to tap the expertise of the Singapore Association of the Deaf (SADeaf) to increase the number of trained staff in the schools.

Dr Janil Puthucheary, Minister of State for Education, said that these efforts are an extension of the support programmes the ministry has for such students.

"Giving our students the opportunity to interact with and learn from one another is a very encouraging step towards forging a more inclusive society," he said.

Ms Irene Yee, president of SADeaf, said that sign language will be used as the language of conversation and to support instruction for such students in the schools. "We are certain that deaf students will benefit tremendously from the integration with their hearing peers in the mainstream designated primary school."

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Students with Hearing Loss to Benefit from Designated Schools in Singapore

In the coming years, MOE intends to simplify things for pupils with special needs. Now students with hearing impairment can expect more support from some of the designated schools in Singapore. They will be learning and playing with the mainstream students in and out of class at some designated mainstream primary and secondary schools.

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What is planned?

As per the statement, in 2017, a Beatty Secondary School will consider students with moderate to severe hearing loss (and who use sign language) in Secondary 1 students. This is a replacement for Balestier Hill Secondary, which does not have a Secondary 1 for this year (2016) and Boon Lay Secondary School, which is a designated secondary school for such students.

Similarly, the primary level admissions for students with hearing loss will start from 2018. Though currently, they attend the Lighthouse School and the Canossian School (the Special Education schools), they will be allowed to pursue their academics in a designated primary school located in a central location.

What will be the benefit of these schools?

As these schools have a small number of students, this action by MOE will help to relocate them to a single designated secondary school and provide a greater sense of community and better opportunities.

The designated schools will hire specially trained teachers who will support students with hearing impairment in different ways including sign interpretation, help in the use of assistive technology devices, social emotional support and much more.

While they will be more open to mutual communication through signing, they will also benefit from social interactions and peer support. Besides, better pooling and strengthening of specialized resources will be added to the benefits list.

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AUD, DHH, VI, O&M, OI (More Information Below) In LAUSD, the Low Incidence Department provides services to children with a documented Low Incidence disability such as a hearing loss, visual impairment, or orthopedic impairment from ages 3-22. The District provides services to students who meet the eligibility criteria under California Ed. Code. The need for Low Incidence Support is individualized to each student, and is prescribed as part of the student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). All service provision is based upon the student’s assessed need and is provided in accordance with the mandates of the IEP and state and federal guidelines.

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The Audiological Resource Unit (ARU) provides an audiologic evaluation completed by an Educational Audiologist for any child from 3-22 years of age. District schools refer students to the ARU when there is a suspected hearing loss, a failed audiometric screening, or a teacher or parent concern regarding a student’s ability to hear.  Additionally, the Educational Audiologists are part of the team that assesses students with suspected Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD). The Educational Audiologists also provide Designated Instructional Services (DIS) to students receiving Deaf and Hard of Hearing services in special day programs; they provide consultative services to students receiving DHH Itinerant Services; and provide support services and professional development regarding the use of residual hearing and amplification systems to students, teachers, families, and other school staff.

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The Visually Impaired (VI) program provides services to students ages 3-22 with visual impairments whose vision loss meets the legal standard as either legally blind or partially sighted and negatively impacts their ability to access core curriculum and/or acquire the skills necessary to participate in fundamental life activities.  Teachers of the Visually Impaired (TVI) provide instruction in the use of specialized materials and equipment necessary to access the core or alternative curriculum in educational settings including general education classrooms,  a VI resource room, the Low Incidence Learning Center (LILC) on a general education campus, and itinerant services for Blind/Partially Sighted (BPS) students and those with additional disabilities. Collaboration with general education teachers, District staff, and parents is essential, with additional support services including Orientation and Mobility, braille transcription, and Instructional Aide Braille assistance. In addition to providing access to the core or alternative curriculum, TVI’s provide instruction in the Expanded Core Curriculum (ECC), a disability-specific set of skills that compensates for vision loss and is foundational to all other learning.  The ECC focuses on compensatory skills, sensory efficiency, orientation and mobility, self-determination, career education, assistive technology, independent living skills, recreation and leisure, and social skills.

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Pinellas County provides educational services to over 200 students identified as deaf or hard-of-hearing. The Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing Program offers a full continuum of services to meet both academic and communication needs identified on a student's individual education plan (IEP). Eligibility for the program is based on both a documented hearing loss and educational need. Services may begin at birth through the Parent-Infant Toddler Program where intervention is provided within the natural environment with direct parent involvement. Students aged 3 through 22 years can receive itinerant services at their home school or attend a designated school site where classes are taught by a teacher certified in deaf education. Each student who is deaf or hard-of-hearing has the opportunity to develop language skills using any or all of the following: residual hearing; speech reading; manual communication systems; speech; and/or appropriate amplification (hearing aids, sound field FM systems, etc.)

Interpreting services may be provided to students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing based on individual need.  The IEP team considers the communication and language needs of each student including opportunities for direct communication with peers and professional personnel in the student’s language and communication mode. Educational Sign Language interpreting services provide students access to classroom curriculum, facilitate communication within an instructional environment, as well as extra-curricular activities.  We also provide interpreting services for parents who are deaf/hard of hearing who want to participate in any school functions. If you would like to request an interpreter for a parent of student, please use the link below.

Request for Pinellas County Schools Sign Language Interpreter  

Additionally, a wide range of audiological services are provided for students through the district’s Audiology Program. All children from birth through graduation who reside in Pinellas County may be tested at our facility, located at Cross Bayou Elementary in Pinellas Park. If you would like to make an appointment or have questions about any audiological report you receive, if you want additional information about the implications of a hearing loss in an educational setting, please all 727-547-7833.

For more information about our DHH program contact:

Tricia Davidson Program Coordinator: Deaf and Hard of Hearing 727-793-2732 Cell /Text 727-424-2531

American Society for Deaf Children A national organization that provides support, encouragement and information to families raising children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. www.deafchildren.org

Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing An international membership organization and resource center on hearing loss, spoken language approaches and related issues. www.agbell.org

American Speech-Language –Hearing Association (ASHA) The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. www.asha.org

National Association of the Deaf (NAD) NAD is a private non-profit organization safeguarding accessibility and civil rights of individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. This organization administers the Captioned Media Program. www.nad.org

Florida Department of Education Deaf and Hard of Hearing This website will have resources, state laws and regulations and contacts. Florida Department of Education Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Cochlear Learn about the latest technology regarding cochlear implants. www.cochlear.com

Classroom Interpreting Classroominterpreting.org was developed with funding from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, awarded to Dr. Brenda Schick at the University of Colorado – Boulder. www.classroominterpreting.org

BabyHearing.org BabyHearing.org is brought to you by a team of professionals at Boys Town National Research Hospital. We are: Audiologists, Speech-Language Pathologists, Teachers of the Deaf, Geneticists, and Parents of Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. This website was originally developed with support from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. www.babyhearing.org

Florida School for the Deaf & Blind Outreach Wherever the need for services and information exists, the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind (FSDB) reaches out to provide support and collaborates on statewide committees. We are more than just a school. For more than 130 years, FSDB has served as a trusted resource throughout the state of Florida and beyond. Our valuable partnerships with parents and families, local, state and national organizations and communities, and school districts impact hundreds of children and adults through our widespread network. www.fsdb.k12.fl.us/index.php/outreach/

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Promoting Hearing Health in Schools

The following are some steps schools can take to prevent noise-induced hearing loss, by limiting exposure to excessive noise on school property, screening for existing noise-induced hearing loss, and teaching students how to protect their hearing.  

Establish Policies That Promote the Hearing Health of Students and Staff

School districts can adopt policies and procedures to minimize excessive noise during the school day and protect the hearing of their students and staff. For example, schools can

  • Eliminate or reduce construction and maintenance activities during school hours
  • Set noise level standards for events such as school dances
  • Ensure that hearing protection devices are available to students, that students are instructed on their proper use, and that these devices are required in classes or activities where students are exposed to potentially unsafe noise levels (e.g., music classes, marching band, industrial arts, and technology education classes).
  • Implement policies consistent with National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommendations to support hearing loss prevention programs for school employees 1  

Establish and Maintain Routine Hearing Screening for All Students

Many schools provide hearing screening as part of required student health assessments. Hearing screening, especially at an early age, provides the opportunity to detect a student’s hearing loss or previously unrecognized hearing loss and intervene to limit further loss and improve learning. 2,3 According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), hearing screening should be conducted

  • At school entry for all children
  • At least once at ages 6, 8, and 10
  • At least once during middle school
  • At least once during high school
  • For any student entering a new school system without evidence of a previous hearing screening

Hearing screening might be required more often for students with other known health or learning needs; speech, language, or developmental delays; or a family history of early hearing loss. 4-6

Hearing screening programs should be consistent with the AAP Criteria for Successful Screening Programs in Schools 2 to ensure that

  • Screening tests are accurate and reliable
  • The school hearing screening site is suitable and appropriate for screening
  • Persons who screen students’ hearing are well-trained and qualified professionals
  • Community and healthcare provider referral mechanisms are in place so that those with identified hearing loss can receive additional evaluation and diagnosis, and appropriate treatment if needed.
  • Student screening results are communicated effectively by the school to students, parents, and healthcare providers
  • Effective treatment and early intervention benefit those with identified hearing loss or hearing difficulties
  • Appropriate educational interventions are implemented to reduce the negative effects of hearing loss on student learning
  • The benefits of hearing screening outweigh the cost of implementing the screening program

Screening programs might not capture all cases of noise-induced hearing loss. Any student or school personnel reporting hearing difficulties or tinnitus (especially after loud sound exposure) should be referred to an audiologist for further evaluation.  

Implement Hearing Loss Prevention Education

Education about noise and its effects on hearing, health, and learning can begin in elementary school. 7 Studies have shown that people who are educated about noise-induced hearing loss and hearing loss prevention are more likely to use hearing protection devices in future occupational and recreational settings. 8,9 Comprehensive hearing loss prevention programs include instruction for students on

  • Normal hearing (auditory) function
  • Types of hearing loss and their causes
  • Common sources of noise that can contribute to hearing loss
  • Noise and its effects on hearing and quality of life
  • Warning signs of noise-induced hearing loss
  • Recommendations for preventing hearing loss 10-12

Hearing loss prevention education can be part of a school’s health education curriculum or integrated across curricula and other school programs by health professionals and trained volunteers, teachers, and parents. For example,

  • School nurses, physicians, audiologists, speech-language pathologists, or well-trained volunteers can help provide accurate information and interactive activities
  • Teachers can be taught how to reduce loud sounds in the school environment and model good hearing protection behavior and attitudes
  • Education also can be provided for parents, encouraging them to practice hearing loss prevention at home and to teach it to their children 13
  • CDC/NIOSH. Revised Criteria for a Recommended Standard: Occupational Noise Exposure (NIOSH Publication 98-126). Cincinnati: US Department of Health and Human Services; 1998.  
  • American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on School Health. School Health:Policy and Practice . 6th edition. Elk Grove, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics; 2004.  
  • American School Health Association. Comprehensive Health Services for Young Children .  
  • American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Practice and Ambulatory Medicine, Bright Futures Steering Committee. Recommendations for preventive pediatric health care. Pediatrics 2007;120:1376–1378.  
  • American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Hearing Screening External . Rockville, MD: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.  
  • American Academy of Audiology. Position statement: identification of hearing loss and middle-ear dysfunction in preschool and school age children. Audiology Today 1997;9(3):21–23.  
  • Knobloch MJ, Broste SK. A hearing conservation program for youth working in agriculture. Journal of School Health 1998;68(8):313–318.  
  • Ewigman B, Kivlahan C, Hosokawa M, Horman D. Efficacy of an intervention to promote use of hearing protection devices by firefighters. Public Health Reports 1990;105(1):53–59.  
  • Lass NJ, Woodford CM, Lundeen C, Lundeen DJ, Everly-Myers DS. The prevention of noise-induced hearing loss in the school-aged population: a school educational hearing conservation program. Journal of Auditory Research 1986;26:247–254.  
  • Anderson KL. Hearing conservation in public schools revisited. Seminars in Hearing 1991;12(4):340–364.  
  • Folmer RL, Griest SE, Martin WH. Hearing conservation education programs for children: a review. Journal of School Health 2002;72:51–57.  
  • Folmer RL. The importance of hearing conservation instruction. Journal of School Nursing 2003;19(3):140–148.  

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The Roosevelt News

Roosevelt High School, Seattle, WA

How Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students Find Community Inside and Outside of School

How Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students Find Community Inside and Outside of School

Examining the social aspects of the DHH program at Roosevelt High School and external resources that cultivate community, solidarity

For centuries, Deaf individuals around the world have been finding and building community. These communities have made large strides in culture, art, innovation, leadership, science, human advancement, and more. They can provide valuable spaces for self-expression and mutual support.

Roosevelt High School is home to the only Seattle public high school program designated specifically for Deaf or Hard of Hearing students. Both within the program and in the greater Seattle area, the local Deaf community works to acknowledge, celebrate, and support Deaf individuals and Deaf culture.  

Deaf culture is rich and complex. Even the way it’s referred to has significance. When referring to community, culture, or those who align themselves with the broader societal identity, the “D” in Deaf is capitalized. When deaf is spelled with a lowercase “d”, it refers specifically to the audiological condition itself. RHS student Priyna Chohan, ‘25, said, “There’s a big difference between a capital ‘D’ Deaf and then a lowercase ‘d’ deaf. Capital ‘D’ Deaf means like you’re involved in the Deaf community and you use ASL of any level, and lowercase ‘d’ deaf means that you are deaf, but you’re not involved in the culture and in the community.”

Further, not all people with impaired hearing refer to themselves in the same way. Some identify as hard of hearing, while others may identify as Deaf. Chohan noted, “Deaf means you have profound hearing loss, and it doesn’t matter when you get that hearing loss. Having profound hearing loss means you can hear basically nothing. If I don’t have my hearing aids, I can’t hear anything. But being hard of hearing basically means that you have lost some of your hearing and you may or may not use hearing aids.” 

Deaf culture and community are defined in large part by the deafness of their members, according to Megan Jones in her Disability Studies Quarterly article,“Deafness as Culture: A Psychosocial Perspective”. She wrote, “An individual who cannot hear is potentially a member of a rich cultural heritage that separates the individual from any non-Deaf members of their family or community.”

While distinctions between capitalization or level of hearing loss may seem minimal to some, their significance is highly important within the Deaf community. Deaf rights advocate Eileen O’Banion writes that “When you are Deaf, you see the world in a different way. You communicate differently. You seek out others who are Deaf because they understand you. You don’t believe you have a disability—and you don’t want to be fixed.” 

Deaf communities can provide a break for DHH people from the closed-minded perspectives certain hearing people may have about them. Examples include audism, the belief that those who can hear are superior, and oralism, using and supporting the oral method of teaching Deaf people to speak.

Chohan shared that she values the space provided by Roosevelt’s DHH program. “It’s definitely fun to be with other people that understand and empathize with my struggles,” she said. “I’d say that we’re pretty well known within Seattle although we’re kind of small.” 

She said that the program “has enough connections to the point where we can [now] go to events, and we’re invited to events.” Members take part in experiences curated by various universities, such as Gallaudet University’s Academic Bowl, and events hosted by the Rochester Institute of Technology. 

Chohan expressed that while the program is active, she would like to see more students like herself enrolled at Roosevelt. ”I do wish [the Roosevelt DHH community] was a little bigger, just so that we could have more ideas and minds. I’m right now the only [completely] deaf student here, but I’m able to relate somewhat to all the other people that are in our small little community. I’ve been trying to get some other Deaf students, incoming ninth graders, to come to Roosevelt.”

Chohan also noted that school is not the only place she or other students find Deaf community. “We definitely do get a lot of opportunities to express our culture, and not just at Roosevelt, but other places too.” The Seattle area is home to an array of organizations and services that provide support to DHH individuals and facilitate community.

The Hearing, Speech, and Deaf Center is a nonprofit that operates within the Greater Puget Sound area. They have offices in Seattle, Bellingham, and Tacoma that provide services related to audiology (the study of hearing and balance systems), communication, and early education. Through the HSDC, clients can find an interpreter or someone to help with medical, legal, and monetary issues. 

Puget Sound Association of the Deaf hosts events to support Deaf, DeafBlind, and Hard of Hearing people. PSAD’s self-proclaimed mission is “to provide educational, historical, leadership, social and recreational programs that enhance the appreciation, culture, languages and understanding and well-being of diverse Deaf, DeafBlind and Hard of Hearing citizens of all ages contributing to the society over 120 years.” 

There are also programs in the Seattle area that focus on uplifting DHH people in specific aspects of their life, like Deaf Spotlight. Deaf Spotlight is a nonprofit organization based in the arts. Online, they highlight their commitment to “supporting original and creative content about, for, and by Deaf, DeafBlind, DeafDisabled, and Hard of Hearing communities.” 

They hold art exhibitions, have a BIPOC Deaf arts grant, and run the Seattle Deaf Film Festival. The organization also hosts an annual camp for 8 to 13-year-olds where “Deaf artists will provide a hands-on exploration of a rich variety of artistic mediums in a well-supervised and Deaf-friendly environment.”

Outside of school, Chohan participates in a DHH social group at Seattle Children’s Hospital. She says that it’s “a really, really big group of hard-of-hearing students and Deaf students, and I’m able to maintain a lot of friendships through there.”

She added, “I think that it’s also helpful because I am able to get advice from other Deaf and Hard of Hearing students who go through the same struggles as me. … The group definitely gives me the ability to just embrace my disability. Even though I’ve never really had a lot of insecurities coming with being Deaf growing up, I definitely think that that group definitely helped me feel more connected to my identity and my disability.”

Samson Abraham, a hard of hearing senior, looks to the future of Roosevelt’s DHH community saying, “Hopefully in the future we can have more DHH kids from other schools, you know, join [Roosevelt] and expand our club.”

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Clarke's services help people who are deaf or hard of hearing succeed at all stages of life

We offer a continuum of Listening and Spoken Language (LSL) programs along with deaf and hard of hearing services at locations along the East Coast and via teleservices.

Infants

We work with families to begin their babies’ listening and spoken language journey--with compassion, expertise and play.

Toddlers

We provide customized education for toddlers who are deaf or hard of hearing to listen and speak, along with coaching for their families.

Preschoolers

Preschoolers

We prepare young children who are deaf or hard of hearing for kindergarten and elementary school.

School-Age Students

School-Age Students

We serve children in mainstream classrooms; offer programs for socialization and leadership-building; and provide audiological services for maximizing access to sound.

Adults & Families

Adults & Families

We offer educational and social opportunities for families, audiological services for individuals of all ages with hearing loss, as well as trainings and workshops.

We have a program to fit your needs...

Whether you want to maximize the early language development of your baby, find a supportive and personalized preschool class for your toddler, discover a small, customized classroom for your school-age student, or have your hearing aids serviced at our award-winning hearing clinic.

  • Birth to Age Three Program
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  • Clarke Hearing Center
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Meet a Clarke family.

Seven-year-old Josie receives Clarke’s tVisits in her mainstream school. Meet Josie and her mother, Elizabeth, who explains the many benefits of the program.

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Clarke's services and programs are designed to help children reach their full potential.

Our goal is to provide caregivers the tools they need to understand their child’s hearing loss. We help them make informed choices about educational options and find the path that is right for their family. Learn more about our Listening and Spoken Language philosophy and deaf or hard of hearing services.

See which listening and spoken language programs and deaf or hard of hearing services are available at a Clarke location near you. Please visit our locations page.

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Clarke's deaf and hard of hearing services are family-focused and outcomes-oriented.

A team of experienced teachers of the deaf, speech-language pathologists, audiologists and other professionals lead Clarke's listening and spoken language programs and deaf and hard of hearing services.

Outcomes

We provide a continuum of services at our sites along the East Coast; in mainstream classrooms; in homes; and remotely using teleservices technology.

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Johnson Scholarship Foundation Visits Clarke Philadelphia

The Johnson Scholarship Foundation toured Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech in Philadelphia to see the Listening and Spoken Language (LSL) services the Clarke team provides to children who are deaf or hard of hearing and learn about their innovative remote LSL services.

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Clarke Hearing Center Welcomes Audiologist Dr. Bianca Berkenwald

Dr. Berkenwald, is an experienced clinical audiologist who supports the hearing health of infants, children and adults.

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Clarke Elects Philadelphia-Based Attorney as Board Chair

Attorney Michael Budner leads national nonprofit board supporting children with hearing loss.

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Meet Tiffany, a Clarke alum and a senior engineer at a medical tech company.

Madeline, center, with her parents, Melissa and Jason.

Madeline, Clarke alum and winner of the 2024 Youth Virtue, Valor and Vision Award.

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Kathleen Excels with Mainstream Support from Clarke 

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Title IX Notice of Non-Discrimination

No student is denied access to any educational program or other activity of Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech on the basis of race, color, ethnic background, national origin, religion, gender, sexual orientation or handicapping condition that does not preclude learning in a listening and spoken language environment. Parents may request written materials in their primary language. Clarke does not discriminate on the basis of sex in admission, administration of its educational programs or activities or employment. Clarke is required by Title IX and its implementing regulations at 34 C.F.R. Part 106 not to discrimination on the basis of sex in admission, administration of its educational programs or activities or employment. The Clarke HR Team, 45 Round Hill Road, Northampton, MA 01060, telephone number 413-582-1155, email [email protected], has been designated as the employee responsible for coordinating Clarke efforts to comply with and carry out its responsibilities under Title IX. Inquiries concerning the application of Title IX and its implementing regulations at 34 C.F.R. Part 106 to Clarke may be referred to the HR Team or to the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, at 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20202-1100, telephone number 800-421-3481.

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Support for Students with Hearing Loss (Designated School 2025)

Celebrating Canossa's 80th

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Canossa Catholic Primary School (CCPS) will be a mainstream primary school designated to support students diagnosed with hearing loss (HL) using the Oral Approach from 2 January 2025. The restructuring of CCPS and Canossian School (CS) under 1 school banner – CCPS is a natural next step for both schools.

Since 1999, CS and CCPS have enjoyed a close school partnership, providing students from both schools meaningful opportunities to interact. CS students have been learning alongside CCPS students for most of the school days across different subjects. They experience recess together, go on learning journeys and school camps and participate in various school events together.

To provide a more inclusive educational experience for the students, Canossa Mission Singapore (CMS) decided to restructure CS and CCPS under a single school, CCPS. With 25 years of strong school partnership, this restructuring will deepen the existing inclusive culture and build a community where the students diagnosed with hearing loss will have more opportunities to learn and play alongside their hearing peers.

Students from both schools will continue to study together in the same form class and participate alongside one another in all school activities. Through interacting with differently-abled peers, the students will cherish each other’s unique gifts and talents. In journeying together, they will learn that while they may be different from one another, they will always be equal in dignity.

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Continuing CS' Support for students with HL

For students diagnosed with HL enrolled in CCPS through the designated programme, educational support will be provided to strengthen their communication and language skills by teachers supporting hearing loss. They will also have access to onsite audiology, speech language and other relevant therapy support.

The students will also receive social emotional support aimed at inclusion, learning and identity. This includes greater support from both CCPS teachers and teachers supporting HL in their learning and character development.

The whole range of CCA offerings, school programmes and leadership opportunities for existing students of CCPS will be made available to all students, including the current students of CS. The provision of increased opportunities for students diagnosed with HL to interact with their peers will help to strengthen interpersonal skills and allow for emotional expression and growth.

Enrolment Process to CCPS under the designated programme:

Q1. How can I enroll my child with moderate to profound hearing loss in Canossa Catholic Primary School(CCPS)? To ensure that specialised supports at CCPS will meet your child's learning needs, please seek a consultation with professionals at KKH's Department of Child Development (DCD), NUH's Child Development Unit (CDU) or SGH ENT Centre on your child's suitability for the designated programme. You may also approach Canossian Child Development Unit (CCDU) if your child is enrolled in the Canossian Early Intervention Programme for Infants and Children (EIPIC). Please bring along all relevant medical and professional reports from your child's previous assessments. You should be prepared for further evaluation or re-evaluation of your child by professionals at the hospitals or Canossian EIPIC to ensure that your child's learning needs can be met in CCPS.

Q2. What if my child is currently seeing a doctor/therapist who is not at KKH, NUH or SGH? A referral from KKH DCD, NUH CDU, SGH ENT Centre or CCDU is required. MOE is working with KKH, NUH, SGH and CCDU to provide educational placement advice to parents with hearing loss. If your child is not currently or actively being seen at KKH, NUH, SGH or CCDU (for children enrolled in the Canossian EIPIC), please obtain a referral from KKH, NUH or SGH. If your child was previously assessed by a private doctor to be suitable to receive the specialised supports at CCPS, do bring along all relevant medical and professional reports from your child’s previous assessment. A further evaluation of your child may be needed. As the referral process may require an evaluation to determine your child’s suitability for specialised supports at CCPS, please take this step early, preferably when your child is in K1, to allow sufficient time for the evaluation. You can access the developmental and audiological services at KKH, NUH or SGH by obtaining a referral from any polyclinic, family doctor or GP, or by calling KKH, NUH, or SGH directly.

Q3. Would it be possible for me to register my child with hearing loss directly into CCPS and receive the specialised supports offered? To ensure that the specialised supports at CCPS will meet the learning needs of the students with HL, parents whose children not currently enrolled in Canossian EIPIC are required to obtain a referral from KKH DCD, NUH CDU or SGH ENT to ensure that the child’s learning needs can be met in CCPS. You are advised to take this step early, preferably when your child is in K1, to allow sufficient time for the evaluation.

Q4. Do I need to participate in the P1 registration? Parents need not participate in the MOE P1 registration exercise if their application is successful. Their child would be directly enrolled in CCPS. If parents are informed that the application is unsuccessful, they should participate in the P1 registration exercise.

Q5. When will I know the outcome of the application? Parents will be notified of the outcome of their application by the second week of June each year, for admission to P1 in CCPS in the following year. For example, applications for P1 2025, notification of outcome will come out by June 2024.

Q6. Can students diagnosed with hearing loss from other mainstream schools transfer to CCPS? Transfers of students diagnosed with hearing loss from other mainstream schools to CCPS will only take place when students meet the admissions criteria for enrolment into the school. MOE is in discussion with relevant stakeholders and will provide more information on the MOE website in the 3rd quarter of 2024. Quotes from teachers and students “This is what our society needs – to be an inclusive Singapore. They will form the new generation of Singaporeans who are receptive to inclusion in our society.” - Miss Joslyn, CCPS teacher “The inclusion programme is a beautiful partnership …It provides an opportunity for children with special needs to play and learn in a mainstream environment.” - Mdm Connie Chua, CS teacher “It has helped me to boost my morale and communication skills … This has made me realise that I should not let my fear hold me back from what I aim to achieve.” - Shermaine Tan Li Ning, former CS student _Disclaimer: All photos and videos were taken either pre-Covid, or with adherence and compliance to prevailing government regulations and COVID-19 safe management measures._

EPSB.ca » Programming » Specialized Programming » Deaf and Hard of Hearing

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Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Program description.

Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DHH) programming supports students with moderate to profound hearing loss.

  • Gain communication, language, skills and strategies necessary to complete high school and access post-secondary education or employment

Guiding principles  

  • Programming based on student’s assessed abilities and needs, and continually monitored and adjusted
  • Participation in Alberta Education’s program of study to the fullest extent possible
  • Meaningful parent and family involvement
  • Access to specialists and resources to support educational programming

For more information about Deaf and Hard of Hearing programming, see Alberta Education's  Essential Components of Educational Programming for Students who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing or contact Alberta School for the Deaf .

Eligibility

Students must be deaf or hard of hearing, and meet eligibility requirements, including a clinical diagnosis identifying the presence of a hearing loss. For more information, contact Alberta School for the Deaf .

Alberta curriculum

All Edmonton Public Schools programming is based on curriculum determined by Alberta Education. Students enrolled in Deaf and Hard of Hearing programming will receive the same high-quality education offered in all of our programs.  

Transportation

Most schools offering specialized programming have some yellow busing options available. For more information about busing, contact    or call Student Transportation at 780-429-8585. 

Alberta School for the Deaf

Elementary 2024–25, junior high 2024–25, senior high 2024–25.

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Edmonton Public Schools is helping to shape the future in every one of our classrooms. We’re focused on ensuring each student learns to their full potential and develops the ability, passion and imagination to pursue their dreams and contribute to their community. Learn More »

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We acknowledge that we are on Treaty 6 territory, a traditional meeting grounds, gathering place, and travelling route to the Cree, Saulteaux, Blackfoot, Métis, Dene and Nakota Sioux. We acknowledge all the many First Nations, Métis, and Inuit whose footsteps have marked these lands for centuries.

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Deaf students who sign can join mainstream primary school from 2018

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SINGAPORE – From 2018, deaf students who use sign language to communicate can attend a mainstream primary school. Currently, they go to one of two Special Education schools.

Here, a group of students from Singapore School for the Deaf were signing the National Anthem in front of a recording video. From 2018, deaf students who use sign language can enrol in a mainstream primary school. Currently, they enrol in one of two Special Education schools. TODAY file photo.

The Education Ministry (MOE) announced this on Tuesday (Sept 20) as part of its enhancement of support for deaf students who sign.

Students with moderate to severe hearing loss, but with adaptive skills to learn in large-group settings can join their mainstream peers in school with this change. The to-be-confirmed primary school will be centrally located and is expected to accept its first batch of deaf students in 2018. MOE said more details will be released later.

MOE also announced that Beatty Secondary School will replace Balestier Hill Secondary School and Boon Lay Secondary School as the school designated for deaf students who sign at the secondary level. It will commence its Secondary One intake from next year.

As there are currently only 15 such students at the secondary level, MOE said having them in one school will allow for better pooling and strengthening of specialised resources, as well as provide students with a greater sense of community, with more opportunities for mutual communication through signing, social interactions and peer support.

Outram Secondary School and St Anthony’s Canossian Secondary School will continue to cater to deaf students who do not require sign language to communicate.

MOE said designating a mainstream primary and secondary school will provide opportunities for deaf students who sign to study and play alongside their mainstream peers in and outside of classroom lessons. It will also allow for a more seamless continuum of educational and community support for them that is important for their social-emotional development.

Designated schools have trained teachers to support deaf students. They provide a range of school-based support, including sign interpretation, in-class and pull-out academic support, social emotional support, and assistance in the use of Assistive Technology devices, such as FM systems.

Dr Janil Puthucheary, Minister of State for Education, said: “This is a further extension of the support programmes MOE has in place for students with moderate to severe hearing loss who communicate through signing. Giving our students the opportunity to interact with and learn from one another is a very encouraging step towards forging a more inclusive society.”

President of Singapore Association for the Deaf Irene Yee said: “This is an exciting time for all of us as this is a good step forward in providing quality education for deaf children. Sign language will be used as the language of conversation and to support instruction for such students in these schools.

“We are certain that deaf students will benefit tremendously from the integration with their hearing peers in the mainstream designated primary school. The provision of learning support for these students will also help them progress towards leading fulfilling lives and work towards building an inclusive society in Singapore.”

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Overview of Services

Anne Arundel County Public Schools provides a continuum of services for deaf and hard of students from birth to age 21.  Teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students provide specialized instruction to meet the unique communication and language needs of their students to enable them to participate in and progress in the general education curriculum. Speech Language Pathologists and Audiologists provide related services to support the student in his /her educational program.  Services and educational program needs are determined by the Individual Educational Program (IEP) process. Accommodations and modifications, the use of assistive listening devices, and /or interpreter/translator services may be required to increase the student’s opportunities to access the general education curriculum.

Eligibility

A current audiological evaluation is required to document that a student is deaf or hearing impaired. There are different definitions and terminology that you may see in identifying and defining hearing loss. IDEA has two categories for which students with hearing loss may be identified.

Deafness: A hearing loss so severe that it precludes a child from processing linguistic information through hearing with or without amplification.

Hearing Impaired: a hearing loss whether permanent or fluctuating, which is less severe than deafness in which a child generally is able to access sound and linguistic information through hearing.

A Student Evaluation Plan is developed and conducted by the IEP team to determine if the hearing loss adversely impacts a student’s educational performance and if the student requires special education and related services

Services for deaf and hard of hearing students are determined by the Individual Education Program process.  Communication and language are the areas of development most impacted by hearing loss. Anne Arundel County Public Schools promotes the use of hearing aids and assistive listening devices to develop oral and auditory skills to the student’s maximum ability. Visual systems of communication such as sign language or cued speech may be used to enhance communication and access for some students as determined by family preference and educational need.

Teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students provide direct and indirect services. They align their instruction with the general education curriculum and support their students in the Least Restrictive Environment.

Infants and Toddlers Program: A teacher of deaf and hard of hearing students is available to provide service to deaf and hard of hearing infants and toddlers as determined by the Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP). Go to Infants and Toddlers Program on this website for more information.

Itinerant Services: A teacher of deaf and hard of hearing students travels to the student’s attending school a designated frequency of time as determined by the IEP. This service delivery model is provided to both students who are in community preschools and school age children K-12.

School-Based Services: Preschool and elementary age students who require intensive services from a teacher of deaf and hard of hearing attend a designated school. Within this model, students are given every opportunity to participate in the general education curriculum.

Audiological Services based at the Anne Arundel County Health Department are available and include both clinical and educational audiological support to students as determined by the IEP.

Speech and Language Services are provided by the speech language pathologist at the students attending school as determined by the IEP.

Sign Language Interpreter Services are provided for students in the general education classroom as well as extra curricular activities as determined by the IEP.

Other Special Services such as occupational and physical therapy are available for deaf and hard of hearing students when additional needs are identified through the IEP process. Resources

Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf: www.agbell.org National Association of the Deaf (NAD): www.nad.org Maryland School for the Deaf: www.msd.edu

Erin Belcher Coordinator of Special Services [email protected] 410-424-3267

Amanda McKee Resource Teacher for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing [email protected]   410-424-3261

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Support for Hearing Loss Students

Applied Learning Programme (STEM @ MFPS)

Learning for Life Programme @ MFPS

Mayflower Primary School (MFPS) is the first designated mainstream primary school in Singapore for students with Hearing Loss (HL) who sign. The school received our first cohort of students with HL in 2018 and these students use both Singapore Sign Language and English to access the national curriculum.

This inclusion aims to:

  • enable students with HL who sign to be socially integrated; 
  • allow students with HL who sign to be immersed in a language-rich environment which provides them with opportunities to learn to communicate and interact better with their peers; and 
  • build empathy in our hearing students as they increase in their awareness and be more sensitive to the needs of their peers with HL.

MFPS recognises this as an empowering educational tool in which our students develop empathy for others. This is a core value and skill to be taught and caught for our students to grow into caring individuals and empathetic leaders of the future.

The Co-Teaching Model

As a step towards inclusivity, students with HL learn alongside their hearing classmates. In each of these classes, the co-teaching instructional approach is implemented. The mainstream Education Officer (EO) and the Specialised Teacher (SpT) of students with HL use a co-teaching model to differentiate and deliver instructions in the classroom.

This inclusive lesson-delivery model gives assurance that all the students with HL have full access to the grade-level expectations of the national curriculum in Singapore.

During lessons, the mainstream EO and the SpT of students with HL support their students in different ways. The EO is viewed as having the expertise in content, and the SpT is regarded as the one having expertise in research-based strategies and techniques to support the students with HL in their learning. The two educators work hand-in-hand in class to create an inclusive learning environment for all students in the classroom.

Social and Emotional Learning for All

designated schools hearing loss

This is beneficial to all students as acquiring a third language enables them to develop mental dexterity. Learning sign language requires both sides of the brain and gives their memory a good workout in the brain gym.

School is an exciting place to be when siblings attend school together. Alya (Pr 4) and Ayra  (Pr 1)  as well as Qyairah (Pr 4) and Qusyairi (P1) are siblings who are enrolled in the programme for students with HL. They are together in each other’s company and provide social-emotional support to one another in the daily rigour of life in school.

designated schools hearing loss

Ten-year-old Alya has a younger sister in Primary One too. She is proud to have her sister joining her in school.

Alya adds,” I make sure that my sister does not go astray or lose focus from studies. Just like me, she will work hard to make our parents proud that we are in a mainstream school. We have made many friends in school and will continue to share and care for everyone in the community in Mayflower Primary School.”

Support for Students with HL

As students with hearing loss acquire the necessary skills in language and literacy, social and behavioural management in a mainstream school, MFPS provides different structures and programmes to support them.

Individualised Education Plan

For each of the student with hearing loss, MFPS charts an Individualised Education Plan (IEP) for them to support their learning in school as well as at home. The teachers managing the student follow the recommendations in the IEP and conduct periodic reviews on the student’s learning progress and refine the intervention plans accordingly.

Facilitated play with Hearing Students

Children learn different social behaviour norms as they interact with one another and the best way to learn these norms is through play. In MFPS, facilitated play is done once a week during recess to educate both hearing students and students with HL how each other communicates – the challenges that the students with hearing loss would face when interacting within a hearing community and how their hearing peers can better communicate with them. At the same time, the students with hearing loss can also be more attuned to how their hearing peers communicate.

Buddy System

If needed, each student with HL will be paired with hearing buddies to assist him / her in the course of the day’s activities. These buddies are active contributors who step forward when the school calls for volunteers, living up to the school’s motto of “Service Before Self”. These buddies undergo training to learn simple sign language. When reaching out to a fellow Mayflower student in school, these buddies will be empowered learners who are able to communicate amongst friends with HL using sign language.

Bonding Session for Students with HL

As part of MFPS effort in touching the hearts of our students, we organise termly bonding sessions for the students with HL. These sessions aim to provide an avenue for our students to learn from the adults in the deaf community and be inspired to be the best that they can be, despite the challenges they face. These sessions also include activities that students with HL in different levels can take part and interact with one another.

Infrastructural Support

There are school-wide infrastructural provisions to ensure accessibility and safety of the students with HL. The school will be fitted with accommodations such as visual ‘announcement’ systems, visual door ‘bells’ and visual ‘alarms’ in the common school areas and classrooms. As the school is undergoing PERI upgrading and is operating from a holding site, these provisions will be made available when the school returns to the original site in 2022. Meanwhile, teachers, classmates and buddies stand united and keep a lookout for their classmates with HL. In addition, our canteen vendors have also implemented a visual-cue card system and use a ‘select-and-point’ ordering process to facilitate a more inclusive environment for all.

Speech and Language Therapy and Audiological support for Students with HL

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Mayflower in the News

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Teaching Music Lessons

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1. Designated Mainstream Primary School For Students with Hearing Loss who Sign - Introduction

  • https://youtu.be/OqEHAcWGeG0

2.   Parents’ Voices - Interview with Parents of Students with Hearing Loss

  • https://youtu.be/v2vSrDARBpU

Storytelling in conjunction with the International Week of the Deaf (IWD) 2020

The students of Mayflower Primary School tell us the story of a quick-witted mouse as he travels through the deep dark woods and meets predators - the most dangerous of all, the Gruffalo!

designated schools hearing loss

Mayflower Primary pays tribute to the Nation

In 2020 when Singapore celebrated her first virtual National Day, Mayflower Primary School also participated in a virtual choir montage by SADeaf, featuring our staff and students where they signed to the lyrics to our favourite song “Home”.

designated schools hearing loss

Enrolment process

How can I enroll my child with moderate to profound hearing loss in Mayflower Primary School? To ensure that the specialised supports at MFPS will meet the learning needs of the students with HL, parents would still be required to seek a consultation with KKH or NUH on their child’s suitability for the support. Parents should bring along all relevant medical/professional reports from your child’s previous assessments. Parents should, however, be prepared for further evaluation or re-evaluation of their child by KKH or NUH to ensure that the child’s learning needs can be met in MFPS.

What if my child is currently seeing a doctor/therapist who is not at KKH or NUH? A referral from KKH’s Department of Child Development (DCD) or NUH’s Child Development Unit (CDU) is required. MOE has worked with KKH and NUH to provide educational placement advice to parents of children with hearing loss. If, however, the child is not currently or actively being seen at KKH or NUH, parents will still need to obtain a referral from KKH or NUH. As the referral process may require an evaluation to determine the child’s suitability for specialised supports at MFPS, parents are advised to take this step early, preferably when the child is in K1, to allow sufficient time for the evaluation. Parents can access the developmental services at KKH or NUH by obtaining a referral from any polyclinic/family doctor / GP, or by calling KKH or NUH directly.

Would it be possible for me to register my child with hearing loss who signs directly into MFPS and receive the specialised supports offered? To ensure that the specialised supports at MFPS will meet the learning needs of the students with HL, parents are required to obtain a referral from KKH’s Department of Child Development (CDC) or NUH’s Child Development Unit (CDU) to ensure that the child’s learning needs can be met in MFPS. Parents are advised to take this step early, preferably when the child is in K1, to allow sufficient time for the evaluation.

What if my private doctor has assessed my child with hearing loss to be suitable to receive the specialised supports at MFPS? To ensure that the specialised supports at MFPS will meet the learning needs of the students with HL, parents would still be required to seek a consultation with KKH or NUH on their child’s suitability for the support. Parents should bring along all relevant medical/professional reports from their child’s previous assessment. Parents should, however, be prepared for further evaluation or re-evaluation of their child by KKH or NUH to ensure that the child’s learning needs can be met in MFPS.

Do I need to participate in the P1 registration? If the application is successful, your child will be directly enrolled into MFPS. Parents then need not participate in the MOE P1 registration exercise.

When will I know the outcome of the application? Parents will be notified of the outcome of their application by 31 May each year, for admission to P1 in MFPS in the following year.

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Cochlear Center Research Day

Department & Center Events

Registration site: https://events.eventzilla.net/e/research-day-2138608660

9-9:30 am - Breakfast,  Location: Anna Baejter

9:30am-10am - General Welcome & Center Updates: Frank Lin, MD, PhD

10am-12pm - Speaker Presentations:  Victoria Sanchez, AuD, PhD , Theresa Chisholm, PhD, Alison Huang, PhD, MPH , James Russell Pike, MBA

12-1:30pm - Keynote presentation: Iracema Leroi, MD, FRCPC, MRCPsych , Professor of Geriatric Psychiatry, Trinity College Dublin School of Medicine

1:30-2pm - Lunch; Feinstone Hall 

2-3:30pm - Poster Sessions & Happy Hour

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How Lexi Vernon overcame hearing loss, now a Centennial softball ace

designated schools hearing loss

Centennial pitcher Lexi Vernon never needed sign language. She can read lips, if she has to, but only uses that skill if necessary.

In essence, Vernon suffers no ill affects from the congenital hearing loss she's had to navigate through since she was born.

But that doesn't mean the Lady Cougars sophomore, who has Power 5 college interest from schools like Iowa and Indiana, hasn't had a difficult path to walk. While a Cochlear implant allowed Vernon to hear, she and her family, had to play catch-up from a condition that should have been caught days after she was born in December of 2007.

"She was skipped, by accident, the day she was born," Lexie's mother, Jamie Motes, said about the routine auditory screening most newborns receive . "We felt great and left the hospital like any other parent, after Lexie was born."

She's a Nashville area high school softball standout for Centennial and has been welcomed by her Centennial teammates after transferring from Franklin prior to the school year.

Vernon's infield teammates gathered in a group hug just after the final out in last Monday's 5-2 win over Independence. Vernon tossed a complete-game, three-hitter and struck out 10 as the Lady Cougars improved to13-5.

"I love it out here," said Vernon who, after Monday's win, has pitched 83 innings with 124 strikeouts and a 1.43 ERA. "I'm relaxed out here. Playing softball is like second nature to me."

Vernon is a veteran of the travel softball circuit and has been a standout in her first season at Centennial. She missed most of her freshman season at Franklin with a broken ankle suffered while playing flag football. Softball is her only sport now.

Lack of speech worried Lexie Vernon's parents

Two months after Vernon was born, her pediatrician noticed she hadn't been given a hearing test after her birth. Despite failing the screening in both ears, Motes and Lexie's dad, Kevin, were told not to be alarmed and to schedule another visit in six to nine months.

After 10 months, both Jamie and Kevin grew increasingly concerned that Lexie was not responding to loud noises and wasn't developing speech, despite also having a brother, Jacob, who is two years older.

In March of 2009, a 13-month old Lexie arrived at Vanderbilt Hospital still unable to talk. She was diagnosed as "profoundly deaf." Finally knowing the reason behind the lack of Lexie's auditory development was little solace.

"She heard nothing," Jamie said. "She'd never heard a sound. Never heard language. Never heard laughter. Our world went dark."

Jamie and Kevin moved to Nashville from Columbus, Ohio prior to Lexie's birth, following Kevin's brother, Rascal Flatts band member Gary LeVox. Never one to sit and sulk, they began working on the best way to help their daughter. They chose to have Lexie fitted with Cochlear implants.

Lexie Vernon given gift of sound

Lexie was implanted with Cochlear implants at 18-months-old at Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center. The electronic device consists of an external processor that sits behind the ear and a second portion that is surgically placed under the skin. The implant does not restore normal hearing, but bypasses portions of the ear and directly stimulates the auditory nerve.

Jamie and Kevin were told to talk to their daughter constantly, to explain in simple terms her environment in an effort to help her develop speech and understand her surroundings.

"Knowing that your kid is hearing your voice for that very first time, it was extremely emotional," Kevin Vernon said. "If you watch any video of someone's 'activation day', that's what they call it when the first time they turn on the implant, you can see everyone has tears. That was us."

Lexie, 16, was too young to recall that moment, but can recall when she became acutely aware of her hearing issue.

"I was so quiet as a kindergartner," she said. "Especially if I was having trouble communicating with other kids. I really didn't learn to develop confidence in speaking with classmates until I was in maybe middle school."

Lexie Vernon thrives despite setbacks

With the help of speech therapists and audiologists, at places like the Mama Lere Hearing School and the Belle Meade Children's Center, Lexi was fully mainstreamed into school by age 4. Lexie has been through different schools looking for the right academic environment that can support hearing loss.

Jamie decided to create a charity in 2011 that addressed specific needs with people dealing with hearing loss.

That developed into Songs for Sound , a charity organization, that helps connect people to life-changing hearing health resources. As the CEO of the organization, Jamie has helped to increase awareness for hearing loss resources and provide access to free testing.

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"That's a lot to overcome as a young kid," Centennial coach Jeff Serbin said. "But now, you wouldn't know she had an implant unless you looked behind her ears. Her speech is fine. She can hear things fine."

Almost too fine.

Their were times when Lexie was younger, she could get overwhelmed with her environment and she admitted she sometimes removes the processors from behind her ears when she's at home.

"It's so peaceful," she said, laughing. "I can't hear a thing and that can be a relief."

Reach sports writer George Robinson at [email protected] and on the X platform (formerly Twitter) @Cville_Sports.  

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The Opening Days of Trump’s First Criminal Trial

Here’s what has happened so far in the unprecedented proceedings against a former u.s. president..

This transcript was created using speech recognition software. While it has been reviewed by human transcribers, it may contain errors. Please review the episode audio before quoting from this transcript and email [email protected] with any questions.

It’s the first day of the Trump trial and just walking out the door in my house. It’s a beautiful day, 6:11 AM. The thing that keeps running through my head is it’s kind of amazing that hundreds of jurors are going to show up at the Manhattan courthouse. And some of them are going to know what they’re there for — probably talking to their friends, their relatives about it.

Some of them are going to learn this morning talking to other jurors in line, asking what all the fuss is about. But I really do imagine that there’s going to be at least one potential juror who, headphones on, getting into court. Here they’re going to be there for the first criminal trial of Donald J. Trump. And just, I mean, how would you react?

[MUSIC PLAYING]

From “The New York Times,” I’m Michael Barbaro. This is “The Daily.” Today, what it’s been like inside the lower Manhattan courtroom, where political and legal history are being made? My colleague, Jonah Bromwich, on the opening days of the first criminal trial of a US President. It’s Thursday, April 18.

Is that his mic? Hi, there.

Hello. How are you?

I’m doing good.

OK. Thank you for coming in, Jonah —

Thank you for having me.

— in the middle of a trial. Can you just explain why you’re able to even be here?

Sure. So we happen to be off on Wednesdays during trial, so.

We being not “The New York Times,” but the courts.

That’s right.

Which is why we’re taping with you. And because we now have two full court days of this history-making trial now under our belts. And the thing about this trial that’s so interesting is that there are no cameras in the courtroom for the wider world.

There’s no audio recordings. So all we really have is and your eyes and your notebook, maybe your laptop. And so we’re hoping you can reconstruct for us the scene of the first two days of this trial and really the highlights.

Yeah, I’d be happy to. So on Monday morning, I left the subway. It’s before 7:00 AM. The sun is just rising over these grandiose court buildings in lower Manhattan.

I’m about to turn left onto Center Street. I’m right in front of the big municipal building.

And I turn onto Center Street. That’s where the courthouses are.

I’m crossing.

And I expected to see a big crowd. And it was even bigger than I had anticipated.

Here we go. Here we go. Here we go. Now, I finally see the crowd.

You have camera banks. You have reporters. You have the beginnings of what will eventually become a protest. And you have this most New York thing, which is just a big crowd of people.

[CHUCKLES]: Who just know something is going on.

That’s right. And what they know is going on is, of course, the first trial of an American president.

All right, I’m passing the camera, folks. Camera, camera, camera, camera. Here we go.

Let’s start with Sharon Crowley live outside the courthouse in Lower Manhattan.

I want to get right to ABC’S Aaron Katersky who’s outside of the courthouse.

Robert Costa is following it outside the courthouse in Lower Manhattan. Bob, I saw the satellite trucks lined up all in a row. Good morning.

Talk to us how we got here exactly.

So this is the case that was brought by the Manhattan district attorney. So prosecutors have accused Donald Trump of covering up the actions of his former fixer, Michael Cohen, after Cohen paid hush money to Stormy Daniels. Stormy Daniels had a story about having had sex with Donald Trump, which Trump has always denied.

Cohen paid her money, and then Trump reimbursed Cohen. And prosecutors say that Trump essentially defrauded the American people because he hid this information that could have been very important for the election from those people when he reimbursed Cohen.

Right. And as I remember it, he also misrepresented what that reimbursement was. Claimed it was a legal fee when, in fact, it was just reimbursing Michael Cohen for a hush money payment.

Exactly, yeah. He definitely didn’t say reimbursement for hush money payment to Stormy Daniels. It’s a cover up case. It’s a case about hiding information you don’t want people to see.

Right. And of course, the context of all this is that it is in the middle of a presidential election. It’s 2016. Trump wants to keep this secret, prosecutors allege, so that the American public doesn’t know about it and potentially hold it against him.

Right. And prosecutors are telling a story about election interference. They’re saying that Trump interfered with an election. And Trump himself is also using the phrase “election interference.” But he’s painting the trial itself as election interference as he now runs again in 2024.

Fascinating.

And because we’re in Manhattan, and because the jury pool is going to be largely Democratic, and the judge is a Democrat, and the district attorney is a Democrat, Trump keeps claiming he cannot get a fair shake. This is democrat central. And in democrat central, Trump doesn’t have a chance.

OK. So, what happens once you actually enter the courthouse?

Outside, there’s all this fanfare. But inside, it’s a little bit business as usual. So I go up to the 15th floor, and I walk into the courtroom, and I sit down, and it’s the same old courtroom. And we’re sitting and waiting for the former president.

Around 9:30, Trump walks in. He looks thin. He looks a little tired, kind of slumping forward, as if to say with his body like let’s get this over with. Here we go.

The judge walks in a little bit after that. And we think we’re all set for the trial to start, but that’s not what happens here. And in fact, there are a series of legal arguments about what the trial is going to look like and what evidence is going to be allowed in.

So, for example, prosecutors ask that they be allowed to admit into evidence headlines from “The National Enquirer” that were attacks on Trump’s 2016 opponents — on Ted Cruz, on Marco Rubio, on Ben Carson.

Because prosecutors are in some sense putting Trump’s 2016 campaign on trial. These headlines are a big part of that because what prosecutors say they show is that Trump had this ongoing deal with “The National Enquirer.” And the publisher would promote him, and it would publish damaging stories about his opponents. And then crucially, it would protect Trump from negative stories. And that’s exactly what prosecutors say happened with Stormy Daniels. That “The National Enquirer” tipped Cohen off about Stormy Daniels trying to sell her story of having had sex with Donald Trump, which he denies. And that led to the hush money payment to her. So what prosecutors are doing overall with these headlines is establishing a pattern of conduct. And that conduct, they say, was an attempt to influence the election in Trump’s favor.

And the judge agrees. He’s going to admit this evidence. And this is a pretty big win for the prosecution. But even though they win that one, they’re not winning everything.

They lose some important arguments here. One of them was that after the Access Hollywood tape came out, there were allegations of sexual assault against Donald Trump. And you know this, Michael, because you reported two of them — two of the three in question at this very trial.

Prosecutors had hoped to talk about those during trial in front of the jury to show the jurors that the Trump campaign was really, really focused on pushing back against bad press in the wake of the Access Hollywood tape in which Trump seemed to describe sexual assault. That was a big problem for the campaign. Campaign did everything it could to push back, including against these allegations that surfaced in the wake of the tape.

But the judge, saying that the allegations are hearsay — that they’re based on the women’s stories — says absolutely not. That is incredibly prejudicial to the defendant.

Interesting.

And that Donald Trump would actually not get a fair trial were those allegations to be mentioned. And so he will not let those in. The jurors will not hear about them.

So this is a setback, of course, for the prosecution, a victory for Trump’s legal team.

It’s a setback. And it also just shows you how these pre-trial motions shape the context of the trial. Think of the trial as a venue like a theater or an athletic contest of some sort. And these pre-trial motions are about what gets led into the arena and what stays out. The sexual assault allegations — out. “The National Enquirer” headlines — in.

OK. And how is Trump sitting there at the defense table reacting to these pre-trial motion rulings from the judge?

Well, as I’ve just said, this is very important stuff for his trial.

Right. Hugely important.

But it’s all happening in legal language, and I’m decoding it for you. But if you were sitting there listening to it, you might get a little lost, and you might get a little bored. And Trump, who is not involved in these arguments, seems to fall asleep.

Seems to fall asleep — you’re seeing this with your own eyes.

What we’re seeing, overall, including our colleague, Maggie Haberman, who’s in the overflow room and has a direct view of Trump’s face — I’m sitting behind him in the courtroom, so I can’t see his face that well.

You guys are double teaming this.

That’s right. I’m sitting behind him, but Maggie is sitting in front of him. And what she sees is not only that his eyes are closed. That wouldn’t get you to he is asleep.

And we have to be really careful about reporting that he’s asleep, even if it seems like a frivolous thing. But what happens is that his head is dropping down to his chest, and then it’s snapping back up. So you’ve seen that, when a student —

I’ve done that.

(CHUCKLES) Yeah. We all kind of know that feeling of snapping awake suddenly. And we see the head motion, and it happens several times.

Lawyers kind of bothering him, not quite shaking him, but certainly trying to get his attention. And that head snapping motion, we felt confident enough to report that Trump fell asleep.

During his own criminal trial’s opening day.

Does someone eventually wake him up?

He wakes up. He wakes up. And in fact, in the afternoon, he’s much more animated. It’s almost as if he wants to be seen being very much awake.

Right. So once these pre-trial motions are ruled on and Trump is snapped back to attention, what happens?

Well, what happens in the courtroom is that the trial begins. The first trial of an American president is now in session. And what marks that beginning is jurors walking into the room one by one — many of them kind of craning their necks over at Donald Trump, giggling, raising their eyebrows at each other, filing into the room, and being sworn in by the judge. And that swearing in marks the official beginning of the trial.

The beginning is jury selection, and it’s often overlooked. It’s not dramatized in our kind of courtroom dramas in the same way. But it’s so important. It’s one of the most important parts of the case. Because whoever sits on the jury, these are the 12 people who are going to decide whether Trump is guilty or whether Trump is innocent.

So how does jury selection actually look and feel and go?

So, jury selection is a winnowing process. And in order to do that, you have to have these people go through a bunch of different hurdles. So the first hurdle is, after the judge describes the case, he asks the group — and there are just short of 100 of them — whether they can be fair and impartial. And says that if they can’t, they should leave. And more than half the group is instantly gone.

So after we do this big mass excusal, we’re left with the smaller group. And so now, jurors are getting called in smaller groups to the jury box. And what they’re going to do there is they’re going to answer this questionnaire.

And this part of the process is really conducted by the judge. The lawyers are involved. They’re listening, but they’re not yet asking questions of the jurors themselves.

And what’s on the questionnaire?

Well, it’s 42 questions. And the questions include, their education, their professional histories, their hobbies, what they like to do whether you’re a member of QAnon or Antifa.

Whether you’re far left or far right.

That’s right. Whether you’ve read “The Art of the Deal,” Trump’s book, which some prospective jurors had.

Right. It was a bestseller in its time.

That’s right. And some of it can be answered in yes/no questions, but some of it can be answered more at length. So some of the prospective jurors are going very, very fast. Yes, no, no, no, yes.

Right. Because this is an oral questionnaire.

That’s right. But some of them are taking their time. They’re expanding on their hobbies. So the potential juror in seat 3, for example, is talking about her hobbies. And she says some running, hiking. And then she said, I like to go to the club, and it got a huge laugh. And you get that kind of thing in jury selection, which is one of the reasons it’s so fun. It’s the height of normality in this situation that is anything but normal.

Right. The most banal answer possible delivered in front of the former president And current Republican nominee for president.

Well, that’s one of the fascinating parts about all this, right? is that they’re answering in front of Trump. And they’re answering questions about Trump in front of Trump. He doesn’t react all that much. But whenever someone says they’ve read “The Art of the Deal —” and there are a few of those — he kind of nods appreciatively, smiles. He likes that. It’s very clear. But because there are so many questions, this is taking forever, especially when people are choosing to answer and elaborate and digress.

This is when you fall asleep.

This Is. When I would have fallen asleep if I were a normal person.

And by the end of the day. Where does jury selection stand?

Well, the questionnaire is another device for shrinking that jury pool. And so the questionnaire has almost these little obstacles or roadblocks, including, in fact, a question that jurors have seen before — whether they would have any problem being fair and impartial?

Hmm. And they ask it again.

They’re asked it again. And they’re asked in this more individualized way. The judge is questioning them. They’re responding.

So, remember that woman who said she liked to go to the club got a big laugh. She reaches question 34. And question 34 reads, “Do you have any strong opinions or firmly-held beliefs about former President Donald Trump or the fact that he is a current candidate for president that would interfere with your ability to be a fair and impartial juror?” She said, yes, she does have an opinion that would prevent her from being fair and impartial. And she, too, is excused.

So that’s how it works. People answer the questionnaire, and they get excused in that way, or they have a scheduling conflict once they reach the jury box. And so to answer your question, Michael. At the end of day one, given all these problems with the questionnaire and the length of time it’s taken to respond to and people getting dismissed based on their answers, there is not a single juror seated for this trial.

And it’s starting to look like this is going to be a really hard case for which to find an impartial jury.

That’s the feeling in the room, yeah.

We’ll be right back.

So Jonah, let’s turn to day 2. What does jury selection look like on Tuesday?

So when the day begins, it looks almost exactly like it looked when the day ended on Monday. We’re still with the questionnaire, getting some interesting answers. But even though it feels like we’re going slow, we are going.

And so we’ve gone from about 100 people to now there’s about 24 the room there’s 18 the jury box. And by the time we hit lunch, all those people have answered all those questions, and we are ready for the next step in the process.

Voir dire. And what it is the heart of jury selection. This is the point where the lawyers themselves finally get to interview the jurors. And we get so much information from this moment because the lawyers ask questions based on what they want out of the jurors.

So the prosecution is asking all these different kinds of questions. The first round of wajir is done by a guy named Joshua Steinglass, a very experienced trial lawyer with the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office. And he’s providing all these hypotheticals. I’ll give you one example because I found this one really, really interesting. He provides a hypothetical about a man who wants his wife killed and essentially hires a hitman to do it. And what he asked the jurors is, if that case were before you, would you be able to see that the man who hired the hitman was a part of this crime?

And of course, what he’s really getting at is, can you accept that even though Michael Cohen, Trump’s fixer, made this payment, Trump is the guy who hired him to do it?

That’s right. If there are other people involved, will jurors still be able to see Donald Trump’s hands behind it all?

Fascinating. And what were some of the responses?

People mostly said, yes, we accept that. So that’s how the prosecution did it.

But the defense had a totally different method of voir dire. They were very focused on their client and people’s opinions about their client.

So what kind of questions do we get from them?

So the lawyer, Todd Blanche, is asking people, what do you make of President Trump? What do you think of President Trump?

And what are some of the responses to that?

Well, there’s this incredible exchange with one of the jurors who absolutely refuses to give his opinion of Donald Trump. They go back and forth and back and forth. And the juror keeps insisting you don’t need to know my opinion of him. All you need to know is that I’m going to be fair and impartial, like I said. And Blanch pushes, and the guy pushes back. And the only way the guy budges is he finally kind of confesses almost at the end that, yes, I am a Democrat, and that’s all we get.

And what ends up happening to this potential juror?

Believe it or not, he got dismissed.

[LAUGHS]: I can believe it. And of course, it’s worth saying that this guy and everybody else is being asked that question just feet from Trump himself.

That’s right. And you might think you were going to get a really kind of spicy, like, popcorn emoji-type exchange from that. But because these are now jurors who have said they can be fair and impartial, who, to some extent, want to be on this jury or at least wouldn’t mind being on this jury, they’re being very restrained.

Mostly, what they are emphasizing — much like that guy just described dis — is that they can be fair. They can be impartial. There’s one woman who gives this really remarkable answer.

She says, I thought about this last night. I stayed up all night. I couldn’t sleep, thinking about whether I could be fair. It’s really important to me, and I can.

What ends up happening to that particular juror?

She’s also dismissed. And she’s dismissed without any reason at all. The defense decides it doesn’t like her. It doesn’t want her on the jury. And they have a certain number of chances to just get rid of jurors — no questions asked.

Other jurors are getting dismissed for cause — I’m doing air quotes with my hands — which means that the lawyers have argued they actually revealed themselves through their answers or through old social media posts, which are brought up in the courtroom, to be either non-credible, meaning they’ve said they can be fair and they can’t, or somehow too biased to be on the jury.

Wait, can I just dial into that for a second? Are lawyers researching the jurors in real time going online and saying — I’m making this up — but Jonah Bromwich is a potential juror, and I’m going to go off into my little corner of the courtroom and Google everything you’ve ever said? Is that what’s happening in the room?

Yeah, there’s a whole profession dedicated to that. It’s called jury consultant, and they’re very good at finding information on people in a hurry. And it certainly looked as if they were in play.

Did a social media post end up getting anybody kicked off this jury?

Yes, there were posts from 2016 era internet. You’ll remember that time as a very heated one on the internet, Facebook memes are a big thing. And so there’s all kinds of lock him up type memes and rhetoric. And some of the potential jurors here have used those. And those jurors are dismissed for a reason.

So we have these two types of dismissals, right? We have these peremptory dismissals — no reason at all given. And we have for cause dismissals.

And the process is called jury selection. But you don’t actually get selected for a jury. The thing is to make it through all these obstacles.

You’re left over.

Right. And so when certain jurors are not dismissed, and they’ve made it through all these stages, by the end of the day, we have gone from zero juror seated to seven jurors who will be participating in Donald Trump’s trial.

Got it. And without going through all seven, just give us a little bit of a sketch of who so far is on this jury. What stands out?

Well, not that much stands out. So we’ve got four men. We’ve got three women. One lives on the Upper East Side. One lives in Chelsea. Obviously, they’re from all over Manhattan.

They have these kind of very normal hobbies like spending time with family and friends. They have somewhat anonymous jobs. We’ve got two lawyers. We’ve got someone who’s worked in sales.

So there’s not that much identifying information. And that’s not an accident . One of the things that often happens with jury selection, whether it be for Donald Trump or for anyone else, is the most interesting jurors — the jurors that kind of catch your attention during the process — they get picked off because they are being so interesting that they interest one or the other side in a negative way. And soon they’re excused. So most of the jurors who are actually seated —

Are not memorable.

Are not that memorable, save one particular juror.

OK. All right, I’ll bite. What do I need to know about that one particular juror?

So let me tell you about a prospective juror who we knew as 374, who will now be juror number five. She’s a middle school teacher from Harlem. And she said that she has friends who have really strong opinions about Trump, but she herself does not. And she insisted several times, I am not a political person.

And then she said this thing that made me quite surprised that the prosecution was fine with having her on the jury. She said, quote, “President Trump speaks his mind, and I’d rather that than someone who’s in office who you don’t know what they’re thinking.”

Hmm. So she expressed approval of President Trump.

Yeah, it was mild approval. But the thing is, especially for the defense in this trial, all you need is one juror. One juror can tie up deliberations in knots, and you can end with a hung jury. And this is actually something that I saw firsthand. In 2019, I was the foreperson on a jury.

How you like that?

Yeah. And the trial was really complicated, but I had thought while we were doing the trial, oh, this is going to be a really easy decision. I thought the defendant in that case was guilty. So we get into deliberations, but there’s this one juror who keeps gumming up the works every time we seem to be making progress, getting a conversation started.

This juror proverbially throws up his hands and says, I am not convicting. This man is innocent. And we talked and we talked. And as the foreperson, I was trying to use all my skills to mediate.

But any time we made any progress, this guy would blow it up. And long story short, hung jury — big victory for the defense lawyer. And we come out of the room. And she points at this juror. The guy —

The defense lawyer.

The defense lawyer points at this juror who blew everything up. And she said, I knew it. I knew I had my guy.

OK. I don’t want to read too much into what you said about that one juror. But should I read between the lines to think that if there’s a hung jury, you wonder if it might be that juror?

That’s what everyone in the courtroom is wondering not just about this juror, but about every single person who was selected. Is this the person who swings the case for me? Is this the person who swings the case against me?

These juries are so complex. It’s 12 people who don’t know each other at the start of the trial and, by the end of the trial, have seen each other every morning and are experiencing the same things, but are not allowed to have talked about the case until deliberations start. In that moment when deliberations start —

You’re going to learn a whole lot about each other.

That’s right. There’s this alchemical moment where suddenly, it all matters. Every personality selected matters. And that’s why jury selection is so important. And that’s why these last two days are actually one of the most important parts of this trial.

OK. So by my math, this trial will require five more jurors to get to 12. I know also they’re going to need to be alternates. But from what you’re saying what looked like a really uphill battle to get an impartial jury or a jury that said it could be impartial — and Trump was very doubtful one could be found — has turned out to not be so hard to find.

That’s right. And in fact, we went from thinking, oh, boy, this is going awfully slowly, to the judge himself saying we could be doing opening arguments as soon as Monday morning. And I think that highlights something that’s really fascinating both about this trial and about the jury selection process overall.

One of the things that lawyers have been arguing about is whether or not it’s important to figure out what jurors’ opinions about Donald Trump are. And the prosecution and, I think, the judge have really said, no, that’s not the key issue here. The key issue is not whether or not people have opinions about Donald Trump.

Right. Who doesn’t have an opinion about Donald Trump?

Exactly. They’re going to. Automatically, they’re going to. The question is whether or not they can be fair and impartial. And the seven people we already have seated, and presumably the five people that we’re going to get over the next few days and however many alternates — we expect six — are all going to have answered that question, not I hate Trump; I love Trump, but I can weigh in on the former president’s innocence or guilt, and I can do it as fairly as humanly possible.

Now, Trump is not happy about this. He said after court yesterday, quote, We have a highly conflicted judge, and he’s rushing this trial.” And I think that he is going to see these beats of the system the criminal justice system as it works on him as he is experiencing it as unfair. That is typically how he talks about it and how he views it.

But what he’s getting is what defendants get. This is the system in New York, in the United States. This is its answer to how do you pick a fair jury? Well, you ask people can you be fair? And you put them through this process, and the outcome is 12 people.

And so I think we’re going to see this over and over again in this trial. We’re going to see Trump experience the criminal justice system.

And its routines.

Yeah, openings, witnesses, evidence, closings. He’s going to go through all of it. And I think, at every turn, it makes sense to expect him to say, well, this is not fair. Well, the judge is doing something wrong. Well, the prosecutors are doing something wrong. Well, the jury is doing something wrong.

But at the end of the day, he’s going to be a defendant, and he’s going to sit, mostly silently if his lawyers can make him do that, and watch this process play itself out. So the system is going to try and treat him like any other defendant, even though, of course —

— he’s not. And he is going to fight back like no other defendant would, like no other defendant could. And that tension, him pushing against the criminal justice system as it strives to treat him, as it would anyone else, is going to be a defining quality of this trial.

Well, Jonah, thank you very much. We appreciate it.

Of course. Thanks so much for having me. [MUSIC PLAYING]

PS, have you ever fallen asleep in a trial?

I have not.

[CHUCKLES]:

Here’s what else you need to know today.

It’s clear the Israelis are making a decision to act. We hope they do so in a way that does as little to escalate this as possible and in a way that, as I said —

During a visit to Jerusalem on Wednesday, Britain’s foreign Secretary left little doubt that Israel would retaliate against Iran for last weekend’s aerial attack, despite pressure from the United States and Britain to stand down. The question now is what form that retaliation will take? “The Times” reports that Israel is weighing several options, including a direct strike on Iran, a cyber attack, or targeted assassinations. And —

Look, history judges us for what we do. This is a critical time right now, critical time on the world stage.

In a plan that could threaten his job, Republican House Speaker Mike Johnson will put a series of foreign aid bills up for a vote this weekend. The bills, especially for aid to Ukraine, are strongly opposed by far-right House Republicans, at least two of whom have threatened to try to oust Johnson over the plan.

I can make a selfish decision and do something that’s different, but I’m doing here what I believe to be the right thing. I think providing lethal aid to Ukraine right now is critically important. I really do. I really — [MUSIC PLAYING]

Today’s episode was produced by Rikki Novetsky, Will Reid, Lynsea Garrison, and Rob Zubko. It was edited by Paige Cowett, contains original music by Marion Lozano, Elisheba Ittoop, and Dan Powell, and was engineered by Chris Wood. Our theme music is by Jim Brunberg and Ben Landsverk of Wonderly Lake.

That’s it for “The Daily.” I’m Michael Barbaro. See you tomorrow.

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  • April 10, 2024   •   22:49 Trump’s Abortion Dilemma
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Hosted by Michael Barbaro

Featuring Jonah E. Bromwich

Produced by Rikki Novetsky ,  Will Reid ,  Lynsea Garrison and Rob Szypko

Edited by Paige Cowett

Original music by Dan Powell ,  Marion Lozano and Elisheba Ittoop

Engineered by Chris Wood

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Political and legal history are being made in a Lower Manhattan courtroom as Donald J. Trump becomes the first former U.S. president to undergo a criminal trial.

Jonah Bromwich, who covers criminal justice in New York, explains what happened during the opening days of the trial, which is tied to Mr. Trump’s role in a hush-money payment to a porn star.

On today’s episode

designated schools hearing loss

Jonah E. Bromwich , who covers criminal justice in New York for The New York Times.

Former president Donald Trump sitting in a courtroom.

Background reading

Here’s a recap of the courtroom proceedings so far.

Mr. Trump’s trial enters its third day with seven jurors chosen.

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We aim to make transcripts available the next workday after an episode’s publication. You can find them at the top of the page.

The Daily is made by Rachel Quester, Lynsea Garrison, Clare Toeniskoetter, Paige Cowett, Michael Simon Johnson, Brad Fisher, Chris Wood, Jessica Cheung, Stella Tan, Alexandra Leigh Young, Lisa Chow, Eric Krupke, Marc Georges, Luke Vander Ploeg, M.J. Davis Lin, Dan Powell, Sydney Harper, Mike Benoist, Liz O. Baylen, Asthaa Chaturvedi, Rachelle Bonja, Diana Nguyen, Marion Lozano, Corey Schreppel, Rob Szypko, Elisheba Ittoop, Mooj Zadie, Patricia Willens, Rowan Niemisto, Jody Becker, Rikki Novetsky, John Ketchum, Nina Feldman, Will Reid, Carlos Prieto, Ben Calhoun, Susan Lee, Lexie Diao, Mary Wilson, Alex Stern, Dan Farrell, Sophia Lanman, Shannon Lin, Diane Wong, Devon Taylor, Alyssa Moxley, Summer Thomad, Olivia Natt, Daniel Ramirez and Brendan Klinkenberg.

Our theme music is by Jim Brunberg and Ben Landsverk of Wonderly. Special thanks to Sam Dolnick, Paula Szuchman, Lisa Tobin, Larissa Anderson, Julia Simon, Sofia Milan, Mahima Chablani, Elizabeth Davis-Moorer, Jeffrey Miranda, Renan Borelli, Maddy Masiello, Isabella Anderson and Nina Lassam.

Jonah E. Bromwich covers criminal justice in New York, with a focus on the Manhattan district attorney’s office and state criminal courts in Manhattan. More about Jonah E. Bromwich

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Find out more about life in Canossian School and its programmes.

  • From 2025, Canossian School (CS) and Canossa Catholic Primary School (CCPS) will be restructured.
  • CS will not be admitting students for the 2025 cohort and beyond.
  • CCPS will be the designated school for students with hearing loss to access the national curriculum through the oral approach. Learn how CCPS can support your child .

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IMAGES

  1. Primary and secondary students with hearing loss to get more help in

    designated schools hearing loss

  2. tips for teaching students with hearing impairments

    designated schools hearing loss

  3. The Four Types of Hearing Loss

    designated schools hearing loss

  4. These PowerPoint presentations make it easy to explain hearing loss at

    designated schools hearing loss

  5. How Common is Hearing Loss?

    designated schools hearing loss

  6. Hearing loss facts and figures infographic

    designated schools hearing loss

VIDEO

  1. Brockton Public Schools hearing on safety concerns

COMMENTS

  1. Primary and secondary students with hearing loss to get more help in

    SINGAPORE - Students with hearing loss will receive more support from designated schools, said the Ministry of Education (MOE) in a statement on Tuesday (Sept 20). Read more at straitstimes.com.

  2. Special educational needs support at mainstream secondary schools

    Specialised support for students with moderate-to-profound hearing loss or visual impairment is provided at designated schools. Services from social service agencies such as AWWA Ltd and The Singapore Association for the Deaf for children with hearing loss, visual or physical impairments. They will assess your child's needs and work with the ...

  3. Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing Program

    Polk County Public Schools provide educational services to approximately 100 students identified as deaf or hard-of-hearing. The Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing Program offers a full continuum of services to meet both academic and communication needs identified on a student's individual education plan (IEP). We provide the educational services and ...

  4. Supporting Success For Children With Hearing Loss

    Accessibility Considerations worksheet (ADA) for Students with Hearing Loss ... s process might call for the teacher or other staff member to communicate the parent's request directly to the designated school official and to notify the parent that the request has been so communicated. In addition, a school district's Section 504 or ADA ...

  5. Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing

    To request an interpreter, please contact 407-317-3409. Interesting Facts Members of the Hearing Screening Program completed initial hearing screenings for 63,796 elementary and middle school students during last school year. Students received over 2,500 comprehensive audiological services at the Audiology Office located at 1600 East Kaley Street.

  6. Students with Hearing Loss to Benefit from Designated Schools

    As per the statement, in 2017, a Beatty Secondary School will consider students with moderate to severe hearing loss (and who use sign language) in Secondary 1 students. This is a replacement for Balestier Hill Secondary, which does not have a Secondary 1 for this year (2016) and Boon Lay Secondary School, which is a designated secondary school ...

  7. Deaf/Hard of Hearing (DHH) Program Options

    The Audiological Resource Unit (ARU) provides an audiologic evaluation completed by an Educational Audiologist for any child from 3-22 years of age. District schools refer students to the ARU when there is a suspected hearing loss, a failed audiometric screening, or a teacher or parent concern regarding a student's ability to hear.

  8. Exceptional Student Education (ESE) / Deaf/Hard of Hearing

    Program Coordinator: Deaf and Hard of Hearing. 727-793-2732 Cell /Text 727-424-2531. American Society for Deaf Children. A national organization that provides support, encouragement and information to families raising children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. www.deafchildren.org. Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

  9. Promoting Hearing Health in Schools

    The prevention of noise-induced hearing loss in the school-aged population: a school educational hearing conservation program. Journal of Auditory Research 1986;26:247-254. Anderson KL. Hearing conservation in public schools revisited. Seminars in Hearing 1991;12(4):340-364.

  10. How Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students Find Community Inside and Outside

    Roosevelt High School is home to the only Seattle public high school program designated specifically for Deaf or Hard of Hearing students. Both within the program and in the greater Seattle area, the local Deaf community works to acknowledge, celebrate, and support Deaf individuals and Deaf culture. Deaf culture is rich and complex.

  11. Our Services : Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech

    Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech is a 501 (c)3 tax-exempt organization and your donation is tax-deductible within the guidelines of U.S. law. To claim a donation as a deduction on your U.S. taxes, please keep your email donation receipt as your official record. We'll send it to you upon successful completion of your donation.

  12. Deaf and hard-of-hearing students

    Response. 1. Over the past 5 years, the number of students with hearing loss has remained relatively stable at about 0.2-0.4% of the cohort at the primary (500-700 students), secondary (500-650 students) and post-secondary education institutions (250-450 students in Junior Colleges, Millennia Institute, polytechnics and Institute of Technical ...

  13. Support for Students with Hearing Loss (Designated School 2025)

    Canossa Catholic Primary School (CCPS) will be a mainstream primary school designated to support students diagnosed with hearing loss (HL) using the Oral Approach from 2 January 2025. The restructuring of CCPS and Canossian School (CS) under 1 school banner - CCPS is a natural next step for both schools. Since 1999, CS and CCPS have enjoyed a ...

  14. Hearing Loss and Inclusive Education

    As at May 2022, over 90% of students diagnosed by hospitals to have hearing loss, including those with moderate-to-severe hearing loss, are enrolled in our mainstream schools and learn alongside their peers. The students' learning in mainstream schools is enabled by Frequency Modulation systems provided by MOE where needed. Students may also ...

  15. Deaf and Hard of Hearing

    Specialized programming for students who have moderate to profound hearing loss includes placement in the designated school with supports or a bilingual/bicultural learning environment to develop proficiency in both American Sign Language (ASL) and English. Print. View a print-friendly version of this program description.

  16. Mayflower Primary School

    In 2018, Mayflower Primary School became the designated school for students with hearing loss. The school adopts a co-teaching model where a mainstream teacher and a specialised teacher jointly plan, coordinate, and deliver instruction to a diverse group of students. The co-teaching model promotes the inclusion of students with hearing loss to ...

  17. Deaf students who sign can join mainstream primary school from 2018

    Designated schools have trained teachers to support deaf students. ... "This is a further extension of the support programmes MOE has in place for students with moderate to severe hearing loss ...

  18. Special Education / Deaf/Hard of Hearing

    Deafness: A hearing loss so severe that it precludes a child from processing linguistic information through hearing with or without amplification. ... Preschool and elementary age students who require intensive services from a teacher of deaf and hard of hearing attend a designated school. Within this model, students are given every opportunity ...

  19. Support for Hearing Loss Students

    Support for Hearing Loss Students. Mayflower Primary School (MFPS) is the first designated mainstream primary school in Singapore for students with Hearing Loss (HL) who sign. The school received our first cohort of students with HL in 2018 and these students use both Singapore Sign Language and English to access the national curriculum.

  20. Pre-School Children with Hearing Loss to Benefit from Dedicated Support

    The MOE Kindergarten at Mayflower Primary School (MK@MF) will provide dedicated support for children with hearing loss (HL) who require early signing instruction. This was announced by Minister of State for Education Ms Sun Xueling during her visit to Mayflower Primary School (MFPS) today. ... Since 2018, MFPS has been the designated primary ...

  21. Beatty Secondary School

    As a designated secondary school, BSS will allow students with moderate to severe hearing loss, to study and play alongside their mainstream peers. For enrolment and registration enquiries, kindly contact the Deaf Education Department under the Singapore Association for the Deaf at [email protected]. Since 2009, Give.Asia is Asia's most ...

  22. Cochlear Center Research Day

    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2024-04-19 13:00 2024-04-19 19:30 UTC use-title Location Wolfe Street Building/W1030 (Anna Baetjer) Wolfe ... Hearing Loss and the Dementia Connection. November 12, 2021. The Hearing Aid Revolution: Cheaper and Easier to Get. October 22, 2021.

  23. Students with hearing loss in mainstream schools

    The school is also resourced with an Educational Interpreter who provides sign interpretation for students to access school-wide activities. Upon completion of their primary education, these HL students may progress to Beatty Secondary School, also a designated school for Hearing Loss (signing) students. For students with more complex needs ...

  24. TSSAA softball: Centennial's Lexi Vernon thrives despite hearing loss

    Lexie has been through different schools looking for the right academic environment that can support hearing loss. Jamie decided to create a charity in 2011 that addressed specific needs with ...

  25. The Opening Days of Trump's First Criminal Trial

    Featuring Jonah E. Bromwich. Produced by Rikki Novetsky , Will Reid , Lynsea Garrison and Rob Szypko. Edited by Paige Cowett. Original music by Dan Powell , Marion Lozano and Elisheba Ittoop ...

  26. Canossian School

    CCPS will be the designated school for students with hearing loss to access the national curriculum through the oral approach. Learn how CCPS can support your child. Vision: A center of excellence for the education of children with hearing loss. Mission: To nurture and empower each in his/her own way by forming hearts, enlightening minds and ...