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Feeling down?  Studies show that an increase in activity can increase happiness, and reduce depressive symptoms. [1]   Using a an Activity Log is one type of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) technique that can help improve both mood and behavior.

The Link Between Depression and Inactivity

With depression it’s common to experience a lack of motivation, fatigue, and feelings of discouragement [2] .  The feelings and self-talk (i.e., internal thoughts) associated with depression may tell you to stay home, sleep more, and not participate in many activities. This contributes to a downward spiral, where more inactivity then leads to greater depression and less happiness.

By choosing to increase your activity level, regardless of how you feel, you can increase exposure to potentially positive experiences.  If low activity due to depression is a problem for you, then simply being more active will likely improve your mood and reduce depression. However, experiences that provide a sense of accomplishment and/or pleasure in particular can have an even greater impact on your emotional state.

A CBT Activity Log  helps provide insight into the connection between activity level and mood state.  This is done by tracking activities (or lack thereof) throughout the day, and monitoring how your mood changes relative to those experiences.

As mentioned previously, engaging in more activities that bring a sense of achievement or pleasure can increase positive emotions and decrease negative ones.

Pleasurable Activities

Examples of activities that are typically pleasurable include: having a nice meal, watching a movie, taking a walk in nature, spending time with a friend, interacting with your child or pet, getting a massage, or playing a game.  The options abound.  Novel activities, trying something new, can be particularly stimulating to the brain, as long as the effort required isn’t too intense, as this may provide a deterrent to somebody in a depressive pattern.

Accomplishment-Oriented Activities

Examples of activities that can provide a sense of accomplishment include: cleaning the house, cooking a meal, finishing a project at work, exercising, helping a friend, fixing something at home.

It’s common for some activities to provide both a sense of pleasure and accomplishment, so these types of experiences are highly valued when it comes to improving your emotional state.

Click Here for the  CBT Activity Log  (PDF file)

[1] Note : as with all recommendations on this site, the information provided is not meant to replace the advice of a professional that knows you personally.  While self-help actions will be sufficient for some, for others, more help is needed.  If that is the case, please contact your local psychotherapist or physician for additional guidance with your depression.

[2] Note : symptoms like fatigue and low motivation may be a sign of another underlying medical problem besides depression.  If you’re experiencing these symptoms, you may want to meet with your medical doctor to discuss further.

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Eva Wilson said on December 13, 2015

Depression is a common psychological disorder faced by many. Yoga is a best platform for the spiritual upliftment of people, and to reduce depression

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CBT Westport

CBT Tools: Activity/Mood Monitoring and Pleasant Event Scheduling

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for many psychological disorders including depression and anxiety. The fundamental principle of CBT is that the way you think in a situation will affect how you feel emotionally and physically and impact your behavior. Among many other skills, CBT teaches us to identify unhelpful patterns of behavior and to develop new and more effective responses.

Thoughts behaviors feelings

This diagram depicts the bi-directional relationship that occurs between a person’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.

Being aware of the relationship between situations, emotions, and behaviors, is an important part of CBT. In order to dive deeper into these relationships, you are asked to track and record the data as if you were an outside observer.

Activity and Mood Monitoring

Activity and mood monitoring enables you to find patterns between what you do and how you feel. In this intervention, you are asked to focus only on the link between your activities and your mood. The goal is to capture activities and mood ratings for every hour of the day. Mood ratings are on a scale of 0-10, with 0 being the worst and 10 being the best.  For example, an activity and mood monitoring form for a morning might look like this:

Schedule

The example above is a snapshot that provides a lot of information. For example, we now know that this person woke up already feeling anxious. He or she was able to combat that anxiety quickly and effectively by exercise and a phone call with a friend, indicating that these are positive coping tools for this person. We also learn that there is a link between receiving an email from their boss and high anxiety. Further, there could be a pattern of anger for this person when they perceive they are let down.

Pleasant Event Scheduling

Another important CBT tool is the intentional scheduling and participating in activities that are enjoyable. People who feel depressed and anxious tend to do fewer things that make them happy. This can have a snowball effect, resulting in a harder time coping with negative feelings. In CBT, you may be asked to intentionally schedule pleasant activities in your day.  Additionally, you will rate your mood before and after. These activities do not have to be expensive or time consuming! You can find many different pleasant activity lists online. Here are just a few simple suggestions:

  • Go for a walk
  • Take a shower or bath
  • Re-read a favorite book
  • Watch a show or a movie
  • Go to a park
  • Collecting things (coins, shells, etc.)
  • Listening to music

Scheduling a pleasant activity is helpful in two different ways. First, the act of scheduling gives a you something to look forward to and as soon as a plan is made, you may benefit from a mood boost. Second, when engaging in the activity, there is typically a positive mood effect.

The above-mentioned CBT tools can be practiced both in and out of therapy. If you have tried these strategies and are still struggling with your mood, it is valuable to consider seeking treatment with a well-trained CBT therapist. A CBT therapist will work collaboratively with you by using values-based interventions to enhance the behavioral goals and activities.

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Search form, reviewing the activity monitoring form.

This video is a follow-up to the three activity monitoring videos. It occurs one week later and is an example of how to review the Activity Monitoring Form with a patient.

Return to main CBT-D video page.

15 Behavioral Activation Worksheets for Depression & Anxiety

Behavioral Activation

At its core, BA aims to enable individuals to reengage with their lives through specific activation techniques (Westbrook, Kennerley, & Kirk, 2011).

Activation techniques help combat behavioral patterns of withdrawal, avoidance, and inactivity, which may perpetuate depressive symptoms by causing additional, secondary problems.

For example, a common clinical symptom of depression is lethargy, where an individual battles to get out of bed. This may lead to skipping work or avoiding seeing friends, resulting in job loss or impaired social relationships.

BA also encourages positive reinforcement in an individual’s environment in order to help increase positive behaviors and reduce those that maintain the depressive cycle.

In this article, we’ve collated some key worksheets and resources to help your clients engage in healthy behaviors on a regular basis.

Before you continue, we thought you might like to download our three Stress & Burnout Prevention Exercises (PDF) for free . These science-based exercises will equip you and those you work with, with tools to manage stress better and find a healthier balance in your life.

This Article Contains:

4 best behavioral activation worksheets, cbt worksheets for depression and anxiety.

  • PositivePsychology.com’s CBT Resources

A Take-Home Message

When in the depths of depression, becoming behaviorally active may feel overwhelming. Breaking tasks and activities down into manageable chunks is an important step in helping clients overcome this.

One practical approach to address this is through the use of worksheets that encourage the application of activation techniques to everyday life. Worksheets can further help to track a client’s progress and can facilitate the use of positive reinforcement, which can motivate them to implement positive behaviors.

To help your clients get going, we’ve assembled some of the best behavioral activation worksheets to promote getting active in a healthy way.

Activity Schedule

Put simply, an Activity Schedule is a diary sheet for each day of the week, with each day divided into one-hour blocks. Because depression is likely to affect a person’s motivation levels, even scheduling basic daily tasks can help them get going.

Creating structure in the daily routine can help regulate sleeping and eating patterns, which are often disrupted when feeling low. It can also help clients gradually face up to activities they’ve been avoiding, such as hobbies and social engagements.

Activity Menu

For depressed individuals, it can sometimes be hard to visualize activities that they may find enjoyable, let alone actually do them. This Activity Menu can help identify tasks that a person can engage with as they start to get more active.

It targets some key life areas that can help people feel better:

  • Connecting with others
  • Expanding the mind
  • Caring for others
  • Planning and goal setting

The activity menu is a useful tool for gradually building a client’s favorite activities into their daily schedule.

Behavior Contract

As part of promoting healthy behaviors and minimizing negative ones, it is important to surround yourself with people and environments in which this is encouraged. While self-motivation is the key to success, support from others who care about you can certainly aid in your progress.

Lejuez, Hopko, LePage, Hopko, and McNeil (2001) suggest talking to someone trustworthy, such as friends and family, about the need to increase healthy behaviors and avoid those that are detrimental to wellbeing. Clients may wish to ask their loved ones to help them pay attention to positive, rather than negative, experiences.

For instance, they may ask friends to only let them spend 25% of their time together talking about their problems and what’s bothering them, leaving the rest of the time to speak about positive experiences or a fun activity that they can do.

This Behavior Contract is a useful way for clients to create a concrete agreement with their friends and family, identifying how they can help the client build better wellbeing.

Pleasurable Activity Journal

When a person is clinically depressed, they can experience anhedonia, which is a lack of pleasure in activities that they used to find enjoyable (Treadway & Zald, 2011).

It can be useful for clients to outline which activities they typically enjoy and gradually build them into their recovery plan. It is further useful to track how pleasurable the client finds such activities over time, to monitor progress. The Pleasurable Activity Journal  is a useful tool to help with this.

CBT Depression

It examines the relationship between a person’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviors and helps individuals to understand and alter negative patterns.

One of the core concepts of CBT is that you ‘feel the way you think.’ CBT works on the idea that if you can think in more helpful ways, you can live a more fulfilling, productive, and happy life.

When faced with emotional difficulties, it’s easy to think that stressful life situations are the direct cause. However, in reality, how you feel and behave are often influenced by your perceptions, thoughts, and beliefs about the events.

With this in mind, we’ve put together key worksheets to help your clients challenge unhelpful thinking.

Increasing awareness of cognitive distortions

Cognitive distortions, or ‘thinking errors,’ are habitual ways of thinking that are often inaccurate and negatively biased. Most of us will experience some form of skewed thinking at least once in our lives, so it’s important to learn how to recognize and tackle these distortions when they arise.

Some of the most common cognitive distortions include:

  • Catastrophizing When we jump to the worst possible conclusion, often using very little information to reach our decision.
  • All-or-nothing thinking When we think of situations, people, and events in extremes.
  • Overgeneralizing When we draw very broad conclusions based on limited experience or information.
  • Mind reading When we think that we know what another person is thinking or feeling, without them actually saying so.
  • Fortune telling When we predict negative events in the future, without realistically considering the chances of that outcome.
  • Labeling When we attach a single negative descriptor to events and people (including ourselves).
  • Emotional reasoning When we believe something to be true because it feels true.
  • Personalizing When we think everything people say or do is directly related to us in some way.

The Unhelpful Thinking Styles worksheet will help clients become more aware of any distorted thinking so that its influence on their feelings and behaviors is reduced. This resource is particularly relevant when working with clients for whom maladaptive thinking styles are linked to symptoms of depression.

Thought Record (Cognitive Restructuring) Worksheet

As part of assessing thinking and identifying cognitive distortions, it’s useful to keep a thought record and consider ways to restructure unhelpful thoughts and perceptions.

The Thought Record worksheet will help clients to:

  • Pause and reflect on their thoughts
  • Identify and understand potential triggering events
  • Recognize negative automatic thoughts
  • Assess their emotional reaction
  • Create alternative thoughts through reinterpretation (restructuring)
  • Reassess their emotional response

Decatastrophizing

The term ‘ catastrophizing ’ originated from the work of Albert Ellis (1962) and was later extended upon by Beck, Rush, Shaw, and Emery (1979) to describe a maladaptive thinking style employed by individuals with anxiety or depression.

Essentially, catastrophic thinking is when we jump to the worst possible conclusions, with very little hard evidence (Quartana, Campbell, & Edwards, 2009). For example, a student who catastrophizes may think they will be kicked out of a program after failing one test. They may drop out, concluding that they will be a ‘failure’ for life.

In reality, failing to pass one test is unlikely to result in such a catastrophe as being removed from a program, and this thinking style is unhelpful to the individual trying to reach their goals.

Use this Decatastrophizing Worksheet to help clients restructure their thoughts when they feel overwhelmed by catastrophic thinking.

Recognizing Rumination

Rumination, which is characterized by persistent negative thinking, has been identified as a key risk factor for depression (Joormann, Yoon, & Zetsche, 2007; Nolen-Hoeksema, Wisco, & Lyubomirsky, 2008).

Ruminating on negative thoughts means there is less space in our working memory to focus on other information, which may be more positive.

Indeed, rumination has been associated with deficits in cognitive control, meaning it’s harder to direct our attention toward goal-directed tasks and away from distracting irrelevant information (Beckwé, Deroost, Koster, De Lissnyder, & De Raedt, 2014; Hallion, Ruscio, & Jha, 2014).

Commonly, ruminative thinking may involve persistently thinking about events that have already happened or questions that cannot be answered, such as:

“Why do I always feel this way?” “If only I hadn’t said that to him.” “If only I’d done X, Y, or Z differently.”

cbt activity monitoring form

Download 3 Free Stress & Burnout Prevention Exercises (PDF)

These detailed, science-based exercises will equip you or your clients with tools to manage stress better and find a healthier balance in their life.

Download 3 Stress & Burnout Prevention Exercises Pack (PDF)

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Table of Common Core Beliefs

‘Core beliefs’ refer to a person’s ‘bottom line’ (Fennell, 1997) – their enduring, fundamental beliefs about themselves, others, and the world around them. Core beliefs are not always negative; however, those that are can be problematic.

A number of factors characterize core beliefs:

  • They are often developed early as a result of childhood experience. They can, however, change later in life (e.g., as a result of adult trauma ).
  • They may exist out of conscious awareness.
  • They can be exhibited through absolute statements and assumptions such as ‘the world is a terrible place.’

Because these beliefs are deeply held at our core, we may not be particularly aware of them. The Table of Common Core Beliefs  can help your clients identify which negative core beliefs they are holding on to.

The Downward Arrow Core Belief Technique

The Downward Arrow Core Belief Technique is a method of Socratic questioning that can help identify problematic core beliefs. It involves identifying situations that bring about negative emotions such as depression, guilt, or shame.

Once a situation that brings up negative feelings has been identified, the client has to define what negative automatic thoughts arise in relation to the situation. The next step (narrowing down) encourages the client to keep asking themselves what the previous answer is likely to represent until they reach an absolute, global statement (reflecting their core belief).

SMART goal setting

One of the fundamental priorities of CBT is to help clients move away from their problems and toward their goals. For therapy to be most effective, it is typical to work toward mutually agreed upon, clearly defined milestones.

Goal setting indicates the possibility for change, which can give hope and reduce helplessness in the face of overwhelming emotions and difficult situations. Many individuals cannot overcome their problems because their goals are too vague. Detailing goals using the SMART technique can help with this.

Put simply, goals should be:

Specific Measurable Attainable Realistic Time-bound (allowing enough time for achievement)

Specifying goals with this level of detail can give clients a sense of autonomy and help break milestones down into manageable steps.

cbt activity monitoring form

17 Exercises To Reduce Stress & Burnout

Help your clients prevent burnout, handle stressors, and achieve a healthy, sustainable work-life balance with these 17 Stress & Burnout Prevention Exercises [PDF].

Created by Experts. 100% Science-based.

PositivePsychology.com’s CBT Resources

Our free Positive CBT Exercises Pack includes three resources that we believe to be most useful for helping clients to alter their negative patterns of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, while promoting a positive view of the self.

This pack features three of our top tools from the Positive Psychology Toolkit© , all of which center on the theme of positive CBT:

  • Solution-Focused Guided Imagery Exercise This visualization helps clients recognize how they can apply their strengths to overcome a problem or adversity. In this exercise, clients take forty minutes to picture a problem in detail, imagine a reality where it is resolved, and leverage their strengths to set goals that may help bring about this reality.
  • Reframing Critical Self-Talk This exercise helps clients strengthen awareness of inner criticism and promote a more self-compassionate stance towards the self. To do this, clients will commit one week to noticing and pausing when critical self-talk arises and consciously rephrase this talk to be more in line with how they’d speak to a loved one.
  • Strengths Spotting by Exception Finding This exercise helps you assess a client’s ability to deal with challenges while also increasing their confidence. In it, clients will reflect on past challenges and the strengths they used to overcome them to discover how they may apply these strengths to their present problems.

If you’re looking for more science-based ways to help others manage stress without spending hours on research and session prep, this collection contains 17 validated stress management tools for practitioners. Use them to help others identify signs of burnout and create more balance in their lives.

It is natural that when we are feeling low, our motivation levels for common tasks and previously enjoyable activities can take a nosedive. This means there are fewer opportunities for positive and rewarding experiences. Often, the less we do, the worse we feel, leading to a perpetual cycle of inactivity and low mood.

Behavioral activation has proven to be an effective treatment for clinical depression (Jacobson et al., 1996). It helps clients to create structure with their day-to-day tasks while aiding in the rediscovery of recreational activities that they once found pleasurable. Reinforcing healthy, enjoyable activities can go a long way in helping a depressed individual feel better.

Sometimes getting going is the hardest part, but with some structure in place and a little nudge in the right direction, we can all move toward healthier, happier behaviors.

We hope you enjoyed reading this article. Don’t forget to download our three Stress & Burnout Prevention Exercises (PDF) for free .

  • Bannink, F. (2012). Practicing positive CBT: From reducing distress to building success . John Wiley & Sons.
  • Beck, A. T., Rush, A. J., Shaw, B. F., & Emery, G. (1979). Cognitive therapy of depression . Guilford Press.
  • Beckwé, M., Deroost, N., Koster, E. H. W., De Lissnyder, E., & De Raedt, R. (2014). Worrying and rumination are both associated with reduced cognitive control. Psychological Research , 78 (5), 651–660.
  • Ellis, A. (1962). Reason and emotion in psychotherapy . Lyle Stuart.
  • Fennell, M. J. (1997). Low self-esteem: A cognitive perspective. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy , 25 (1), 1–26.
  • Hallion, L. S., Ruscio, A. M., & Jha, A. P. (2014). Fractionating the role of executive control in control over worry: A preliminary investigation. Behaviour Research and Therapy , 54 , 1–6.
  • Jacobson, N. S., Dobson, K .S., Truax, P. A., Addis, M. E., Koerner, K., Gollan, J. K., … Prince, S. E. (1996). A component analysis of cognitive-behavioral treatment for depression. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology , 64 (2), 295–304.
  • Joormann, J., Yoon, K. L., & Zetsche, U. (2007). Cognitive inhibition in depression. Applied and Preventive Psychology , 12 (3), 128–139.
  • Lejuez, C. W., Hopko, D. R., LePage, J. P., Hopko, S. D., & McNeil, D. W. (2001). A brief behavioral activation treatment for depression. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice , 8 (1), 164–175.
  • Mazar, A., & Wood, W. (2018). Defining habit in psychology. In B. Verplanken (Ed.). The psychology of habit: Theory, mechanisms, change, and contexts . Springer.
  • Nolen-Hoeksema, S., Wisco, B. E., & Lyubomirsky, S. (2008). Rethinking rumination. Perspectives on Psychological Science , 3 (5), 400–424.
  • Quartana, P. J., Campbell, C. M., & Edwards, R. R. (2009). Pain catastrophizing: A critical review. Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics , 9 (5), 745–758.
  • Treadway, M. T., & Zald, D. H. (2011). Reconsidering anhedonia in depression: Lessons from translational neuroscience. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews , 35 (3), 537–555.
  • Westbrook, D., Kennerley, H., & Kirk, J. (2011). An introduction to cognitive behaviour therapy: Skills and applications . Sage.
  • Wood, W., & Rünger, D. (2016). Psychology of habit. Annual Review of Psychology , 67 , 289–314.

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cbt activity monitoring form

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3 Stress Exercises Pack

What is Activity Monitoring?

Sonia, the therapist

Activity monitoring is a way to collect accurate data about the manner in which patients are spending their time. In order for a patient and clinician to get a better understanding of what the patient is doing each day and how this may relate to his or her mood, the patient is asked to complete an Activity Monitoring form. This form is a tool to help patients document how they spend their day and how it relates to their mood.

Select the button below to see an example of part of Joe’s activity monitoring form.

Activity Monitoring Form

Completing an Activity Monitoring Form

There are three areas that need to be completed on the form. Roll over each number on Joe’s form to see what they are .

Joe is asked to record all activities done each day, no matter how ordinary or small.

For each activity, he also rates on a 0-10 scale how much pleasure he experienced in doing the activity and how strong a sense of mastery or competence he felt in doing the activity. Note that “M” means mastery and “P” means pleasure. Higher ratings mean a greater sense of mastery or pleasure.

Joe also rates his overall mood each day on a 0-10 scale, with 0 being the worst mood and 10 being the best mood.

Reviewing an Activity Monitoring Form

To help a patient see the mood-behavior connection through the completed activity monitoring form, a therapist will draw the patient’s attention to some key pieces of information on the form; there are four key pieces of information on the form. Do you know what they are? Select ‘DISPLAY’ on the table for the answers.

What Do You Notice?

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Resource type

Therapy tool.

cbt activity monitoring form

"Should" Statements

Information handouts

ABC Model

Activity Diary (Hourly Time Intervals)

Activity Diary (No Time Intervals)

Activity Diary (No Time Intervals)

Activity Menu

Activity Menu

Activity Planning

Activity Planning

Activity Selection

Activity Selection

All-Or-Nothing Thinking

All-Or-Nothing Thinking

Alternative Action Formulation

Alternative Action Formulation

An Introduction To CBT (Psychology Tools For Living Well)

An Introduction To CBT (Psychology Tools For Living Well)

Books & Chapters

Anger - Self-Monitoring Record

Anger - Self-Monitoring Record

Anger Decision Sheet

Anger Decision Sheet

Anger Diary (Archived)

Anger Diary (Archived)

Anger Self-Monitoring Record (Archived)

Anger Self-Monitoring Record (Archived)

Anger Thought Challenging Record

Anger Thought Challenging Record

Anxiety - Self-Monitoring Record

Anxiety - Self-Monitoring Record

Anxiety Self-Monitoring Record (Archived)

Anxiety Self-Monitoring Record (Archived)

Arbitrary Inference

Arbitrary Inference

Assertive Communication

Assertive Communication

Assertive Responses

Assertive Responses

Attention - Self-Monitoring Record

Attention - Self-Monitoring Record

Audio Collection: Psychology Tools For Mindfulness

Audio Collection: Psychology Tools For Mindfulness

Audio Collection: Psychology Tools For Overcoming PTSD

Audio Collection: Psychology Tools For Overcoming PTSD

Autonomic Nervous System

Autonomic Nervous System

Avoidance Hierarchy (Archived)

Avoidance Hierarchy (Archived)

Before I Blame Myself And Feel Guilty

Before I Blame Myself And Feel Guilty

Behavioral Activation Activity Diary

Behavioral Activation Activity Diary

Behavioral Activation Activity Planning Diary

Behavioral Activation Activity Planning Diary

Behavioral Experiment

Behavioral Experiment

Behavioral Experiment (Portrait Format)

Behavioral Experiment (Portrait Format)

Belief Driven Formulation

Belief Driven Formulation

Belief-O-Meter (CYP)

Belief-O-Meter (CYP)

Boundaries - Self-Monitoring Record

Boundaries - Self-Monitoring Record

Catastrophizing

Catastrophizing

Catching Your Thoughts (CYP)

Catching Your Thoughts (CYP)

CBT Appraisal Model

CBT Appraisal Model

CBT Daily Activity Diary With Enjoyment And Mastery Ratings

CBT Daily Activity Diary With Enjoyment And Mastery Ratings

CBT Thought Record Portrait

CBT Thought Record Portrait

Challenging Your Negative Thinking (Archived)

Challenging Your Negative Thinking (Archived)

Changing Avoidance (Behavioral Activation)

Changing Avoidance (Behavioral Activation)

Checking Certainty And Doubt

Checking Certainty And Doubt

Classical Conditioning

Classical Conditioning

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Anorexia Nervosa (Fairburn, Cooper, Shafran, 2003)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Anorexia Nervosa (Fairburn, Cooper, Shafran, 2003)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD: Veale, 2004)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD: Veale, 2004)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Bulimia Nervosa (Fairburn, Cooper, Shafran, 2003)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Bulimia Nervosa (Fairburn, Cooper, Shafran, 2003)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Clinical Perfectionism (Shafran, Cooper, Fairburn, 2002)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Clinical Perfectionism (Shafran, Cooper, Fairburn, 2002)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Depersonalization (Hunter, Phillips, Chalder, Sierra, David, 2003)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Depersonalization (Hunter, Phillips, Chalder, Sierra, David, 2003)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Fear Of Body Sensations

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Fear Of Body Sensations

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD: Dugas, Gagnon, Ladouceur, Freeston, 1998)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD: Dugas, Gagnon, Ladouceur, Freeston, 1998)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Health Anxiety (Salkovskis, Warwick, Deale, 2003)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Health Anxiety (Salkovskis, Warwick, Deale, 2003)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Insomnia (Harvey, 2002)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Insomnia (Harvey, 2002)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Intolerance Of Uncertainty And Generalized Anxiety Disorder Symptoms (Hebert, Dugas, 2019)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Intolerance Of Uncertainty And Generalized Anxiety Disorder Symptoms (Hebert, Dugas, 2019)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Low Self-Esteem (Fennell, 1997)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Low Self-Esteem (Fennell, 1997)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD: Salkovskis, Forrester, Richards, 1998)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD: Salkovskis, Forrester, Richards, 1998)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Panic (Clark, 1986)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Panic (Clark, 1986)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Persistent Postural-Perceptual Dizziness (PPPD: Whalley, Cane, 2017)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Persistent Postural-Perceptual Dizziness (PPPD: Whalley, Cane, 2017)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD: Ehlers & Clark, 2000)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD: Ehlers & Clark, 2000)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Social Phobia (Clark, Wells, 1995)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Social Phobia (Clark, Wells, 1995)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of The Relapse Process (Marlatt & Gordon, 1985)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of The Relapse Process (Marlatt & Gordon, 1985)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Tinnitus (McKenna, Handscombe, Hoare, Hall, 2014)

Cognitive Behavioral Model Of Tinnitus (McKenna, Handscombe, Hoare, Hall, 2014)

Cognitive Behavioral Treatment Of Childhood OCD: It's Only A False Alarm: Therapist Guide

Cognitive Behavioral Treatment Of Childhood OCD: It's Only A False Alarm: Therapist Guide

Treatments That Work™

Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Childhood OCD: It's Only a False Alarm: Workbook

Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Childhood OCD: It's Only a False Alarm: Workbook

Cognitive Case Formulation

Cognitive Case Formulation

Cognitive Distortions – Unhelpful Thinking Styles (Common)

Cognitive Distortions – Unhelpful Thinking Styles (Common)

Cognitive Distortions – Unhelpful Thinking Styles (Extended)

Cognitive Distortions – Unhelpful Thinking Styles (Extended)

Compassionate Thought Challenging Record

Compassionate Thought Challenging Record

Core Belief Magnet Metaphor

Core Belief Magnet Metaphor

Court Trial Thought Challenging Record (Archived)

Court Trial Thought Challenging Record (Archived)

Critical Care And PTSD

Critical Care And PTSD

Critical Illness Intensive Care And Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Critical Illness Intensive Care And Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Cross Sectional Formulation

Cross Sectional Formulation

Daily Monitoring Form

Daily Monitoring Form

Decatastrophizing

Decatastrophizing

Demanding Standards – Living Well With Your Personal Rules

Demanding Standards – Living Well With Your Personal Rules

Depression - Self-Monitoring Record

Depression - Self-Monitoring Record

Discounting In Perfectionism – The Ratchet Effect

Discounting In Perfectionism – The Ratchet Effect

Disqualifying Others

Disqualifying Others

Disqualifying The Positive

Disqualifying The Positive

Dissociation - Self-Monitoring Record

Dissociation - Self-Monitoring Record

Embracing Uncertainty

Embracing Uncertainty

Emotional Reasoning

Emotional Reasoning

Evaluating Unhelpful Automatic Thoughts

Evaluating Unhelpful Automatic Thoughts

Evaluating Your Demanding Standards

Evaluating Your Demanding Standards

Examining Your Negative Thoughts

Examining Your Negative Thoughts

Exploring Problems Using A Cross Sectional Model

Exploring Problems Using A Cross Sectional Model

Exposure And Response (Ritual) Prevention For Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (Second Edition): Therapist Guide

Exposure And Response (Ritual) Prevention For Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (Second Edition): Therapist Guide

Exposure And Response Prevention

Exposure And Response Prevention

Exposure Practice Form

Exposure Practice Form

Exposure Session Record

Exposure Session Record

Exposures For Fear Of Appearing Anxious

Exposures For Fear Of Appearing Anxious

Exposures For Fear Of Body Sensations

Exposures For Fear Of Body Sensations

Exposures For Fear Of Breathlessness

Exposures For Fear Of Breathlessness

Exposures For Fear Of Death

Exposures For Fear Of Death

Exposures For Fear Of Flying

Exposures For Fear Of Flying

Exposures For Fear Of Heights

Exposures For Fear Of Heights

Exposures For Fear Of Illness

Exposures For Fear Of Illness

Exposures For Fear Of Losing Control Of Your Mind

Exposures For Fear Of Losing Control Of Your Mind

Exposures For Fear Of Uncertainty

Exposures For Fear Of Uncertainty

Exposures For Fear Of Vomiting

Exposures For Fear Of Vomiting

Externalizing

Externalizing

Links to external resources.

Psychology Tools makes every effort to check external links and review their content. However, we are not responsible for the quality or content of external links and cannot guarantee that these links will work all of the time.

  • Scale Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • Bern Inventory of Treatment Goals | Grosse, Grawe | 2002 Download Primary Link Archived Link

Cognitive therapy competence / adherence measures

  • Manual Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • Manual Download Archived Link
  • Manual accs-scale.co.uk Download Primary Link
  • Feedback form accs-scale.co.uk Download Primary Link
  • Website accs-scale.co.uk Download Primary Link

Case Conceptualization / Case Formulation

  • Cognitive conceptualisation (excerpt from Basics and Beyond) | J. Beck Download Archived Link
  • Dysfunctional assumptions ideas Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • Developing a cognitive formulation | Michael Free Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • Case formulation in CBT | Caleb Lack Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • A case formulation approach to cognitive-behavior therapy | Jacqueline Persons | 2015 Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • The case formulation approach to cognitive behavior therapy | Jacqueline Persons | 2014 Download Primary Link Archived Link

Information (Professional)

  • Cognitive- behavioural therapy An information guide | Neil Rector | 2010 Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • A therapist’s guide to brief cognitive behavioral therapy | Cully, Teten | 2008 Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • Problem solving (OCT Practical Guides | Helen Kennerley | 2016 Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • Working with Schemas, Core Beliefs, and Assumptions | Frank Wills | 2008 Download Primary Link Archived Link

Presentations

  • The role of a case conceptualization model and core tasks of intervention | Donald Miechenbaum | 2014 Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • Transdiagnostic treatments for anxiety disorders | Martin Anthony | 2013 Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • The unified protocol for the transdiagnostic treatment of emotional disorders | Ellen Frank, Fiona Ritchey | 2015 Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • Making CBT Work (Working with your CBT therapist / Making your CBT therapist work with you) | Paul Salkovskis Download Archived Link

Treatment Guide

  • A manual of cognitive behavior therapy for people with learning disabilities and common mental disorders | Hassiotis, Serfaty, Azam, Martin, Strydom, King | 2012 Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • CBT case formulation | Jacqueline Persons Download Primary Link

Recommended Reading

  • Hofmann, S. G., Asnaani, A., Vonk, I. J., Sawyer, A. T., & Fang, A. (2012). The efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy: a review of meta-analyses. Cognitive therapy and research, 36(5), 427-440 Download Primary Link
  • Schema change processes in cognitive therapy | Padesky | 1994 Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • Wright, B., Williams, C., & Garland, A. (2002). Using the Five Areas cognitive–behavioural therapy model with psychiatric patients. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 8(4), 307-315. Download Primary Link
  • Williams, C., & Garland, A. (2002). Identifying and challenging unhelpful thinking. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 8(5), 377-386. Download Primary Link
  • Garland, A., Fox, R., & Williams, C. (2002). Overcoming reduced activity and avoidance: a Five Areas approach. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 8(6), 453-462. Download Primary Link
  • Williams, C., & Garland, A. (2002). A cognitive–behavioural therapy assessment model for use in everyday clinical practice. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 8(3), 172-179. Download Primary Link
  • A provider’s guide to brief cognitive behavioral therapy | Cully, Dawson, Hamer, Tharp | 2021 Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • Padesky, C. A., Mooney, K. A. (1990). Clinical tip: presenting the cognitive model to clients. International Cognitive Therapy Newsletter, 6, 13-14 Download Primary Link Archived Link
  • Arch, J. J., & Craske, M. G. (2009). First-line treatment: a critical appraisal of cognitive behavioral therapy developments and alternatives. Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 32(3), 525-547 Download Archived Link

What Is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy?

Assumptions of cbt.

  • people actively process information;
  • our appraisals (the way that we think and interpret events) determine how we feel;
  • dysfunctional thinking and biases in information processing (cognition/​thinking) are responsible for the problems that people experience;
  • different problems are associated with different cognitive themes (cognitive specificity theory): depression is associated with loss and defeat; anxiety is associated with danger and threat; obsessive-compulsive disorder is associated with inflated responsibility; substance abuse is associated with permissive beliefs; eating disorders are associated with self-criticism; social anxiety is associated with fear of evaluation; and PTSD is associated with appraisals of immediate threat;
  • the thoughts that we have can be ‘distorted’ or biased . Common biases include over-generalization, arbitrary inference, selective abstraction, and catastrophizing;
  • changing how we think and act will impact how we feel: cognition, emotion, and behavior interact in a reciprocal manner;
  • psychopathology is a result of an interaction between stress and vulnerability;
  • cognition happens at multiple levels (Alford & Beck, 1997) and all can influence the way that we feel and behave: preconscious, unintentional, automatic (e.g., negative automatic thoughts); the conscious level (e.g., if a patient is asked to explain the meaning of an automatic thought); and the metacognitive level (beliefs about beliefs);
  • experiences, memories, thoughts, attitudes, and beliefs are encapsulated as ‘schemas’ and which may become activated and influence our perceptions and behaviors.

Principles of CBT

Judith Beck (1995) identified 11 principles of the practice of cognitive behavioral therapy, and these were expanded by Wills (2009):

  • cognitive behavioral therapists use formulation to focus their therapeutic work
  • cognitive behavioral therapists use formulation to tackle interpersonal and alliance issues
  • cognitive behavioral therapy requires a sound therapeutic relationship
  • cognitive behavioral therapists stress the importance of collaboration in the therapeutic relationship
  • cognitive behavioral therapy is brief and time-limited
  • cognitive behavioral therapy is structured and directional
  • cognitive behavioral therapy is problem- and goal-oriented
  • cognitive behavioral therapy initially emphasizes a focus on the present
  • cognitive behavioral therapy uses an educational model
  • homework and self-practice is a central feature of cognitive behavioral therapy (incorporating the use of CBT worksheets)
  • cognitive behavioral therapists teach clients to evaluate and modify their thoughts
  • cognitive behavioral therapy uses various methods to change cognitive content including thought records, behavioral experiments, surveys
  • cognitive behavior therapy uses a variety of methods to promote behavioral change including exposure, behavioral experiments, role-play.

Procedures and Techniques of CBT

  • Data gathering and symptom monitoring   are used to understand problems and to measure change. CBT is an evidence-based approach that relies upon accurate data gathering regarding symptoms and experiences.
  • Behavioral activation   is a set of techniques for encouraging engagement in meaningful activity and is an effective treatment for depression.
  • Case formulation   is a method for understanding the origin and maintenance of a problem in cognitive and behavioral terms. CBT therapists may use a mixture of cross-sectional formulation to understand difficulties in the here-and-now, longitudinal formulation to understand the origins and precipitants of a problem, and cognitive behavioral models to understand the mechanisms underlying a problem.
  • Cognitive restructuring   describes techniques for changing what we think. It often involves the use of thought records, behavioral experiments, data gathering, or psychoeducation.
  • Exposure   is a technique from behavior therapy that is extensively used by CBT therapists, particularly for the treatment of anxiety. ‘Facing your fears’ is an essential behavioral component of CBT.
  • Problem solving   describes a series of techniques that are often taught as part of a CBT intervention. Effective problem solving helps people to make adaptive choices.
  • Socratic methods are used by CBT therapists to help their clients explore what they know, and to form their own opinions on a topic. Aaron Beck encouraged the use of Socratic-like technique in his original treatment manual “use questioning rather than disputation and indoctrination … it is important to try to elicit from the patient what he is thinking rather than telling the patient what the therapist believes he is thinking” (Beck et al, 1979).
  • Alford, B. A., & Beck, A. T. (1997). The relation of psychotherapy integration to the established systems of psychotherapy.  Journal of psychotherapy integration ,  7 (4), 275-289.
  • Beck, A. T., Rush, A. J., Shaw, B. F., & Emery, G. (1979). Cognitive therapy of depression . New York: Guilford.
  • Beck, J. S. (1995). Cognitive therapy: Basics and beyond . New York: Guilford.
  • Wills, F. (2009). Beck’s cognitive therapy . CBT Distinctive Features Series. New York: Routledge.
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cbt activity monitoring form

Free Downloads 2 - CBT Worksheets

cbt activity monitoring form

CBT Information Leaflets & Self Help Guides (free downloads).

Worksheets - alphabetical  (scroll down to PDFs)

Generic Formulations & Therapist Resources

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Other Pages

Information Leaflets & Self Help Guides

All sheets alphabetical:    Sheets A - M       Sheets N - Z (without images)

Cognitive Models & Formulations

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  • Card pack: 56 cards for self help

For specific condition or approach, find via   Problems  or  Solutions  pages.

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cbt activity monitoring form

Worksheets in Aphabetical order

cbt activity monitoring form

Generic  Formulations & Therapist Resources

3 Questions  to ask whens starting therapy

cbt activity monitoring form

THE DECIDER SKILLS FOR SELF HELP

cbt activity monitoring form

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Enhanced Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

Resources and Handouts

Therapist self-rated cbt-e components checklist (cbt-e cc).

  • CBT-E CC for adults
  • CBT-E CC for adolescents

Bailey-Straebler S, Cooper Z, Dalle Grave R, Calugi S, Murphy R. Development of the CBT-E Components Checklist: A tool for measuring therapist self-rated adherence to CBT-E. IJEDO. 2022;4. doi: https://www.doi.org/10.32044/ijedo.2022.02. Download PDF

Handouts from Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Eating Disorders

From C. G. Fairburn,  Cognitive behavior therapy and eating disorders , Guilford Press, New York, 2008.

  • F2.3 – CBT-E formulation of bulimia nervosa
  • F2.4 – CBT-E formulation of “restricting” anorexia nervosa
  • F2.5 – Transdiagnostic CBT-E formulation
  • T4.2 – Points to make when describing CBT-E
  • T5.1 – Topics to cover when assessing the eating problem
  • F5.2 – CBT-E formulation of eating disorder NOS in the patient’s own words
  • T5.2 – Instructions for self-monitoring
  • F5.3 – Blank monitoring record
  • Example monitoring record
  • T6.1 – Topics to cover when educating patients about eating disorders
  • T6.2 – Patient handout on regular eating
  • F8.3 – Over-evaluation of control over shape and weight – an extended formulation
  • F8.5 – Feelings of fatness
  • F9.3 – Over-evaluation of control over eating – an extended formulation
  • F10.2 – Binge analysis
  • F11.2 – CBT-E formulation of binge eating / purging anorexia nervosa
  • T11.2 – Patient handout on the effects of being underweight
  • T12.1 – Short-term maintenance plan
  • T12.2 – Long-term maintenance plan
  • F13.1 – Transdiagnostic CBT-E formulation with clinical perfectionism added
  • F13.2 – Over-evaluation of achieving and achievement – an extended formulation
  • F13.3 – CBT-E formulation of bulimia nervosa with core low self-esteem added

Handouts from Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Adolescents with Eating Disorders

From Dalle Grave R, Calugi S. Cognitive behavior therapy for adolescents with eating disorders . New York: Guilford Press; 2020.

  • F2.1 – CBT-E map for adolescents with eating disorders
  • F2.2 – The four levels of care of multistep CBT-E for adolescents with eating disorders
  • T3.1 – Topics to be addressed when assessing the nature and severity of the eating disorder
  • T3.2 – Main points made when describing CBT-E to the young underweight patients
  • T4.1 – Step One procedures and when they are implemented
  • F5.3 – Formulation of an underweight adolescent patient with eating disorder highlighting how the effects of significantly low weight maintain the eating problem
  • F5.5 – Blank monitoring record
  • T5.1 – Instructions for self-monitoring
  • T5.2 – Main topics to cover when educating adolescent patients about eating disorders
  • F7.1 – Weight graph for underweight adolescent patient with eating disorder
  • T8.1 – Patient handout on regular eating
  • T9.4 – Main topics to cover when educating patients about purging
  • T9.6 – Main topics to cover when educating patients about excessive exercising
  • T10.1 – Review of how treatment is going after step one
  • T10.2 – Obstacles to change and strategies used to address them
  • F12.2 – A personalized extended formulation of an underweight adolescent patient with an eating disorder
  • F12.3 – Two-prong strategy to address the overvaluation of shape, weight and their control
  • F13.3 – An extended formulation of an adolescent patient with overvaluation of control over eating
  • T16.1 – Short-term maintenance plan template
  • T16.2 Long-term maintenance plan template
  • F17.1. Formulation of an underweight adolescent eating disorder and clinical perfectionism
  • F17.5 – The transdiagnostic formulation with the inclusion of core low self-esteem
  • T17.1 – Interpersonal history table
  • F17.7 – The transdiagnostic formulation with the inclusion of marked interpersonal difficulties
  • F17.9 – Formulation of a not-underweight adolescent patient with an eating disorder and mood intolerance
  • T18.2 – An example of how intensive outpatient CBT-E for adolescents is organized
  • My Monitoring Record
  • My Monitoring Record For Shape Checking
  • MY Weight Chart
  • Dietary Rules Inventory
  • MY MONITORING RECORD
  • MY MONITORING RECORD FOR SHAPE CHECHING
  • EPCL SUMMARY SHEET
  • DIETARY RULES INVENTORY

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  1. Cbt Thought Record Template Download Printable PDF

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  2. Daily Monitoring Form CBT Worksheet

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  3. CBT Behavioral Activation Worksheet PDF Template

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  4. CBT Daily Activity Diary With Enjoyment And Mastery Ratings

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  5. Top 6 Cbt Activity Log free to download in PDF format

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  6. Daily Monitoring Form

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COMMENTS

  1. PDF Activity Monitoring Form

    Activity Monitoring Form Please list the activities you did on each day of the week during each hour. Below each activity rate the degree of Pleasure (P) and Mastery/Accomplishment (M) on a 0-10 scale for each (with 10 being the greatest amount). Please also rate your Overall Mood for each day, 0-10, where 0 is feeling Worst and 10 is feeling Best.

  2. How to Do Activity Scheduling: 6 Templates & Worksheets

    What Is Activity Scheduling in CBT and Therapy? 2 Real-Life Examples of Activity Scheduling Does It Work? 4 Proven Benefits How to Do Activity Scheduling: 6 Tips 6 Best Templates & Worksheets Are There Helpful Apps and Software? Useful Resources From PositivePsychology.com A Take-Home Message References

  3. CBT WORKSHEET PACKET

    The (Traditional) Cognitive Conceptualization Diagram allows you to extract a great deal of information about clients' most central beliefs and key behavioral patterns; it helps you understand the connections between clients' childhood experiences, the development of core beliefs about the self, world and future, and the ways in which clients co...

  4. PDF CBT Activity Log

    Happiness Tools: Weekly Activity Log with Mood Monitoring Using this log can help you identify specific activities that contribute to a positive or negative mood state, as well as patterns related to activity level in general. Resting and replenishing are good things, but too much inactivity can contribute to lower moods and energy.

  5. CBT Worksheets

    100 of 495 resources Order by Name Popular Recent "Should" Statements Information handouts A Guide To Emotions (Psychology Tools For Living Well) Books & Chapters A Memory Of Caring For Others Audio A Memory Of Feeling Cared For Audio ABC Model Worksheets Activity Diary (Hourly Time Intervals) Worksheets Activity Diary (No Time Intervals)

  6. CBT Worksheets

    The Cognitive Triangle. worksheet. The cognitive triangle illustrates how thoughts, emotions, and behaviors affect one another. This idea forms the basis of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Perhaps most important to CBT, when a person changes their thoughts, they will also change their emotions and behaviors.

  7. Daily Monitoring Form

    Daily Monitoring Form Activity diaries can be used for activity monitoring during an assessment phase of therapy, symptom monitoring during therapy, correlating activity with symptoms, or activity scheduling as part of behavioral activation.

  8. Reduce Depression by Using a CBT Activity Log

    A CBT Activity Log helps provide insight into the connection between activity level and mood state. This is done by tracking activities (or lack thereof) throughout the day, and monitoring how your mood changes relative to those experiences.

  9. CBT Techniques: 25 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Worksheets

    Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Worksheets (PDFs) To Print and Use. If you're a therapist looking for ways to guide your client through treatment or a hands-on person who loves to learn by doing, there are many cognitive-behavioral therapy worksheets that can help. 1. Coping styles worksheet.

  10. PDF Activity Planning and Mood Monitoring

    The purpose of this exercise is to identify, schedule, complete and rate your satisfaction levels for between five and thirty activities each week. The exercise is completed in two parts. Part one involves working through the full list and identifying those activities that you are able or prepared to commit to over the next four weeks.

  11. Log

    Jeanette Lantz, Ph.D. Online Cognitive Behavioral Psychologist Licensed Psychologist Washington - PY60502318 California - PSY23674. [email protected]

  12. CBT Tools: Activity/Mood Monitoring and Pleasant Event Scheduling

    For example, an activity and mood monitoring form for a morning might look like this: The example above is a snapshot that provides a lot of information. For example, we now know that this person woke up already feeling anxious.

  13. Activity Scheduling: What It Is, Examples, & Effectiveness

    Activity scheduling can be used on its own or in conjunction with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Activity scheduling is a CBT technique based on the premise that regularly engaging in pleasant activities may help alleviate depression and elevate mood.

  14. Self-Monitoring

    Self-monitoring is a technique which cognitive behavioral therapists almost always teach their clients. It is a form of data-gathering in which clients are asked to systematically observe and record specific targets such as their own thoughts, emotions, body feelings, and behaviors.

  15. PDF Activity Scheduling Form

    Activity Scheduling Form Instructions: At the beginning of the week, plan out how you will be spending your week, including any behavioral activation exercises. As you go through the week, circle activities you actually did, or write in what you did if you did something different. Please also rate

  16. Reviewing the Activity Monitoring Form

    You are here Home › Reviewing the Activity Monitoring Form Reviewing the Activity Monitoring Form This video is a follow-up to the three activity monitoring videos. It occurs one week later and is an example of how to review the Activity Monitoring Form with a patient. Return to main CBT-D video page.

  17. 15 Behavioral Activation Worksheets for Depression & Anxiety

    4 Best Behavioral Activation Worksheets CBT Worksheets for Depression and Anxiety PositivePsychology.com's CBT Resources A Take-Home Message References 4 Best Behavioral Activation Worksheets When in the depths of depression, becoming behaviorally active may feel overwhelming.

  18. What is Activity Monitoring?

    Activity monitoring is a way to collect accurate data about the manner in which patients are spending their time. In order for a patient and clinician to get a better understanding of what the patient is doing each day and how this may relate to his or her mood, the patient is asked to complete an Activity Monitoring form.

  19. Beck Institute

    Our CBT Worksheet Packet has been updated with new and revised worksheets from the third edition of Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Basics and Beyond. Designed by Dr. Judith Beck for use in clinical settings, this e-booklet contains Cognitive Conceptualization Diagrams (both traditional and strength-based), Thought Records, Case Write-up Worksheets ...

  20. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is a popular form of psychological therapy that works with our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. CBT is an integration of principles from behavior therapy with theory and methods from the cognitive therapies developed by Aaron Beck and Albert Ellis.

  21. PDF Have you ever noticed that certain things that you do influence your

    other CBT skills such as cognitive restructuring. Behavioral activation helps us understand how behaviors influence emotions, just like cognitive work ... Based on the mood ratings you recorded on the Activity Monitoring Worksheet, determine which activities helped you to feel more positive ("UP" activities) and which led to feeling down

  22. Free Downloads 2

    GAD & Worry MMT - MultiModal Therapy Online & CCBT Psychosis Clock (EIP) The Decider Skills for Self Help online self help course Free Downloads 2 - CBT Worksheets CBT Information Leaflets & Self Help Guides (free downloads). This page: Worksheets - alphabetical (scroll down to PDFs) Generic Formulations & Therapist Resources

  23. Resources and Handouts

    F2.2 - The four levels of care of multistep CBT-E for adolescents with eating disorders. T3.1 - Topics to be addressed when assessing the nature and severity of the eating disorder. T3.2 - Main points made when describing CBT-E to the young underweight patients. T4.1 - Step One procedures and when they are implemented.