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How to Assign a Macro to a Button in Excel (Easy Guide)

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While there are many different ways to run a macro in Excel, none of those methods can be as easy and user-friendly as clicking on a button.

And for that to work, you need to assign a macro to a button first.

In this tutorial, I will show you a couple of ways to insert a button in  Excel and then assign a macro to that button (or shape). Once done, as soon as a user clicks on the button, the macro VBA code would be executed.

For the purpose of this tutorial, I will be using the below VBA macro code (which simply selects cell A1 in the active sheet and enters the text “Good Morning” in it and colors it red).

The above VBA code is placed in a regular module in the VB Editor

Adding VBA Macro to a regular module

Now let’s dive right in and see how you can assign this macro to a button or shape in Excel!

This Tutorial Covers:

Insert a Shape and Assign Macro to that Shape

While there are dedicated buttons that you can insert in the worksheet and then assign the macro to it, I will first cover how to assign a macro to a shape .

I personally love this method and prefer it over the rest two methods covered later. You can easily insert a shape (square or rectangle) and can make it look like a button.

And since it’s a shape, you can easily format it to look perfect with your existing formatting or brand colors.

Below are the steps to insert a shape in Excel:

Click the Insert Tab

  • Resize the rectangle and format it (give it a border, color, shade if you want).

After you have done the above steps, you will have a rectangle shape in the worksheet, and now we will assign a macro to this shape.

Now let’s see how to assign a macro to this shape.

  • Right-click on the shape on which you want to assign the macro

Click on Assign Macro

  • In the Assign Macro dialog box, you will see a list of all the macros that you have in the workbook

Select the macro from the list

  • Click on OK

That’s it!

The selected macro has now been assigned to the shape.

Now when you hover the cursor over the shape, it will show the hand icon. which indicates that now this shape has become clickable.

The button becomes clickable

And now if you click on the shape, it will run the assigned macro .

You can type any text within the shape to make it more intuitive (such as ‘Click here to run the macro’). To do this. right-click on the shape and then click on Edit Text. Now you can type within the text box shape.

Edit Text option to add text to the shape

Note that you won’t be able to click and run the macro when the shape has been selected (i.e., you see a border around the shape that appears when you select it), To make it clickable, hit the Escape key or click anywhere in the worksheet.

Also, when you have assigned the macro to the shape already, you will not be able to select it by using the left mouse key (as it has become clickable and left-click would now execute the macro). In that case, select the shape, hold the control key and then press the left key.

Keeping Shape Visible When you Hide/Resize Rows/Columns

In Excel. when you insert a shape, it sits over the cells – like a chart/object.

This also has a drawback that when you resize or hide rows/columns that have the shape over it, the shape also follows suit.

In the below example, the shape gets hidden when I hide the column on which it’s placed.

If you don’t want this to happen, follow the below steps:

  • Right-click on the shape

Right click and then click on Format Shape

  • In the Format Shape pane (or dialog box in case you’re using Excel 2010 or prior versions), select Size and Properties

Click on Don't move or size with cells

  • Close the pane (or dialog box)

Now, when you resize rows/columns or hide these, the shape would stay in its place.

Assign a Macro to Form Control Button

If you’re not too concerned with the formatting of the button and are ok with regular gray buttons, you can quickly insert it from form control (or ActiveX control as shown next) and then assign a macro to it.

For this to work, you will need to have the Developer tab in your ribbon. If you don’t have it, here is a detailed step-by-step tutorial on getting the developer tab in the Excel ribbon .

Once you have the developer tab visible, you can use the below steps to quickly insert a button and assign a macro to it:

Click the Developer tab

  • Click anywhere on the worksheet. This will insert the button wherever you click and automatically open the ‘Assign Macro’ dialog box.

The above steps would insert a button that has the specified macro assigned to it.

By default, it would be a small button with text such as ‘Button’ written on it. You can change the text to whatever you want and can also change the shape of the button (by dragging the edges).

Since this is an object that is placed over the worksheet (just like shapes/charts), you can drag and place it anywhere in the worksheet.

One drawback of using the Form Control button is that you don’t have much control over the formatting. For example, you can not change the color from gray to something else.

Although there is a little bit of formatting that you can do with a Form control button, it’s nowhere close to what you can do with shapes.

You get these button formatting options when you right-click on the button and then click on Format Control.

Right click on the button and then click on format control

This will open the Format Control dialog box where you can change the font type/color, size, alignment, etc.

Formatting options for a form control button

One good thing about this button is that it doesn’t hide or resize when you hide the rows/columns or resize them. It would, however, move in case you change the height or width or the row/column over which the button is placed.

In case you don’t want the button to stay in its place, you can change the setting by following the below steps:

  • Right-click on the button
  • Click on Format Control
  • Click on the Properties tab

Select do not move or size with cells options for the form control button

Assign a Macro to an ActiveX Control Button

Apart from the Form Control button, there is also an ActiveX control button to which you can assign a macro.

In most cases, you won’t need to use the ActiveX control button, and I recommend you use it only when you completely understand what it is and you know what you’re doing.

This also, sometimes, make ActiveX a bit glitchy and unpredictable. So, while I cover it in this tutorial, I don’t recommend using ActiveX button and assign a macro to it.

To insert an ActiveX button and then assign a macro to it, follow the below steps:

  • Click on the Developer tab
  • In the Control group, click on Insert.

Click on ActiveX Control Command Button option in the developer tab

  • Click anywhere on the worksheet. This will insert the button wherever you click.
  • Double-click on the button and it will open the VB Editor backend where you can place the code for the ActiveX button

With ActiveX control, you get a lot more flexibility with a single button. For example, you can specify one macro to be run when you simply click on the button once and another macro when you double-click or even another one when you use the up/down arrow key.

Again, not something you need to be using in your regular work.

Hope you found this tutorial useful. If you’re interested in learning VBA, you can check out more in-depth Excel VBA tutorials here .

You may also like the following Excel tutorials:

  • How to Record a Macro in Excel
  • Creating a User Defined Function (UDF) in Excel VBA
  • Excel VBA MsgBox [Message Box]
  • Useful Excel Macro Examples for VBA Beginners
  • How to Remove Macros From an Excel Workbook
  • How to Enable Macros in Excel?

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1 thought on “How to Assign a Macro to a Button in Excel (Easy Guide)”

Following the procedure here, I cannot assign a Macros from an *.xlam workbook (addin). Is there a way to do this? thx

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Excel Assign Macro to Button (3 Suitable Examples)

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In order to run a macro we need to go to the developer tab and choose your desired macro. You also can do it from the View tab. But if it is some kind of code that you need to run multiple times then it can be a bit cumbersome and irritating. To resolve this issue we can assign this macro to a button. In this way, the process will be very easy to execute. In this article, we will show how we can assign macro to button in Excel in detailed steps.

Below we showed a simple method where we assigned a macro to a button. We created this Form Control button from the developer tab in Excel.

Excel Assign Macro to Button

We showed 3 separate examples of Excel assigning a macro to a button. Here we have a dataset where we have Student information. We want to sort this data according to the age of the students. We will create a VBA macro SortData and will attach this macro to a button. User needs to understand the methods first and then try to implement the methods according to their needs. In order to avoid any kind of compatibility issue, try to use the Excel 365 edit i on .

1. Using Excel Command Buttons to Assign Macro

Assigning Macro to buttons can be done for two separate types of form types, one is the ActiveX control and another one is the Form Control .

1.1 Using Form Controls Feature

In this method, we need to add a Form Control in the worksheet, and then assign macro code to it.

  • Go to the Developer tab > Insert tab > Form Control From there click on the Command Button icon.

Add form control command button from developer tab

  • Then draw the button on the worksheet.

Drawing the button on the worksheet

  • After drawing the button in the worksheet, the command button will look like the below image.

Button on the worksheet after drawing it to assign a macro to the button in Excel

  • Now we need to sort data in the worksheet with Excel VBA.
  • For this, go to the Developer tab > Visual Basic .

VBA editor Initialization

  • Go to the Insert > Module.

Inserting Module

  • Then in the code editor window, enter the following code.

 VBA code for sorting values

  • Save the code and close the code editor.
  • Now go back to the worksheet and then right-click on the button created earlier.
  • Next, from the context menu, click on the Assign Macro.

Assign macro to the button from context menu in Excel

  • In the Assign Macro window, select SortData .

select which macro to assign

  • This code is going to be attached to this Form Control  button.
  • Pressing this button will trigger the code, and we can see that the dataset is in the range of B5:G9, based on the Age column.

Sorted values after pressing Button

1.2 Assigning Macro to ActiveX Controls

We will add the ActiveX control button from the Developer tab and then will assign the Macro to it.

  • In order to add an Activex Control button, go to the Developer tab > Insert tab > ActiveX Control From there click on the Command Button icon.

Add activex control form from Developer

  • Then draw the button in the worksheet, and then right-click on it.

Drawing Button on the Worksheet

  • From the context menu, click on the View Code .

open the code editor of the button to assign macro to the button in Excel

  • And then paste the code into the code editor.

The code in the code editor

  • Click on the Save command and close the editor.
  • Then the code will be assigned to the button.
  • After that, if we press over the button then we can see that the code executed and the data in the B5:G9 is now sorted based on the Age column.

Sorted values after pressing the Activex button

2. Creating Shape as a Button and Assign a Macro in Excel

Apart from creating buttons and then assigning code to them, we can also create various shapes and then assign code to them.

  • First, go to the Insert tab > Shapes > Rectangle. From there pick the round-edged rectangular boxes.

Add shapes in the worksheet

  • Then draw on the worksheet.

Draw the shapes on the worksheet to assign macro to the shape button in Excel

  • Now we need to add a code that will sort data in the worksheet.
  • After Visual Basic opens, go to the Insert > Module .
  • Now in the dataset, select the shape, right-click on it, and then from the context menu, click on the Assign Macro .

Assign macro to shape button in Excel

  • From the Assign Macro window, select SortData .
  • Next, click on OK .
  • After that, if we click on the Shape, we can see that the code executes and the dataset in the range of B5:G9 is sorted according to the Age  column.

Sorted dataset after pressing the shape

3. Using VBA Macro to Create Excel Button and Assign Another Macro

This macro will create a macro button for the worksheet automatically and will assign the desired code to it.

  • We can enter the following code in the code editor and click on the Run  option.

Running VBA macro to add a button to the worksheet and assign a VBA macro to that button in Excel

  • We will see that there is a command button, and then we can left-click on it.
  • And this button has actually already been assigned to the code SortData mentioned above.

Button present in the worksheet after pressing the RUN command with assigned code

  • We can test this code by clicking on the button.
  • After clicking on the button, we can see that the data in the range of cell B5:G9 is now sorted according to their Age .

Sorted data after pressing the button

How to Assign a Macro to a Keyboard Shortcut Button in Excel

Here, we will show how you can assign a macro to a keyboard shortcut in Excel. Pressing that destined shortcut will run the macro automatically.

  • To assign a macro code to a shortcut button in Excel, you can follow the below steps.
  • Go to the Developer tab > Macros .

Macros option open from the developer tab

  • Then you will see the list of  saved   macros in the worksheet.
  • And we have a macro named as SortData, this macro basically sorts data in a selected range of cells. We want to assign this macro to a keyboard shortcut.
  • For this, click on Options .

Macros option open from the developer tab

  • Then in the Shortcut key: press Shift+R .
  • This will basically mean that your macro is now assigned to the Ctrl+Shift+R shortcut key.
  • Click OK after this.

Assigning the required keyboard button

  • After pressing OK we can see that the data stored in the range of cell B5:G9 is now sorted according to their Age .

Assign the required keyboard button in Excel

How to Insert Macro Buttons into Excel Ribbon

Apart from adding a button in the worksheet and then assigning a macro to it, we can add a Macro button to the ribbon menu and run code from there.

1. Add Macro Button to Quick Access Toolbar

  • Right-click on the ribbon menu and select “ Customize Quick Access Toolbar ” or click on the small drop-down arrow to the right of the Quick Access Toolbar and select “ More Commands. “

Assign the Macro button command to the quick-access toolbar in Excel

  • It will open the Excel Options Then go to the Quick Access Toolbar menu, select Macros from Popular Commands, and click on the Add .

Macro addition from choose commands from to right panel

  • After clicking on the Add command, we can see that the Macros are now in the right panel.

Addition of Macro from choose command from

  • Finally, we can see that the Macro button is now attached to the ribbon.

Assign Macro button in the quick access menu in Excel

2. Add a Macro Button to Your Own Group on the Ribbon or Toolbar

You can add a dedicated macro button to the Excel ribbon custom tab and then run the macro directly from there.

  • For this, first, you need to right-click on the ribbon menu and from there, click on Customize the Ribbon .
  • Then from the Excel Options tab, go to Quick Access Toolbar > click on the New Tab in the Customize the Ribbon. Rename the Tab and the Group underneath it.
  • Then from the Choose commands from the  drop-down menu, select  Macros.
  • Right after selecting the Macros, there will be a list of macros stored in the worksheet.
  • Select SortData, and then click on  Add .
  • We can see that the SortData has now been added to the  Group .
  • After this, you will notice that there is a new tab in the ribbon and upon switching to it we can see that there is the SortData macro button within another Group .
  • Pressing the SortData button will trigger the macro and we will see that the dataset in the range of B5:G9 is now sorted based on the Age column.

Things to Remember

  • Choose a descriptive name: Give your macro a descriptive name that explains what it does, so it’s easy to understand and identify later.
  • Test the macro: Before assigning the macro to a button, make sure it works correctly and does what you want it to do.
  • Consider security: Be cautious when running macros, as they can potentially contain harmful code. Make sure that you trust the source of the macro and have enabled macros in your Office program.
  • Choose an appropriate button location: Choose a button location that makes sense and is easy to access. The Quick Access Toolbar, Ribbon, or your own custom group on the Ribbon or Toolbar are good options.
  • Use a clear icon or image: If you choose to use an icon or image for your macro button, make sure it’s clear and easy to understand.
  • Organize your macros: If you have multiple macros, consider organizing them into groups or categories to make them easier to find and access.
  • Document your macros: If you’re sharing your macros with others, be sure to document them thoroughly, including what they do and any specific instructions for running them.

Frequently Asked Questions

1. How do I record a macro with a button?

We can record Macro easily by clicking over the Record Macro from the Developer tab.

After that whatever action you take, will be recorded and can be repeated in the same process if you want.

Record macro from developer tab

2. How do I run a macro in Excel when clicking a specific cell?

Yes, you can do that by using the below code. For example, let’s say you have a macro stored in a MyMacro. Now if you want to run this code while clicking on a specific cell, then enter this code in the worksheet and save it.

After that, whenever you click on a cell, it will run the MyMacro . Use or modify the code according to your own needs.

Code to run macro while selecting a specific cell

3. How do I edit a Macro Button?

We can edit the macro button by right-clicking the button, and then we can see that there is another tab as Shape Format that is now present in the ribbon.

From this tab, we can see that there are numerous options to modify the appearance of the button.

Shape tab to modify the button

Download Practice Workbook

You can download the Excel workbook from here.

Here, in this article, we have shown Excel assign macro to button, whether they are ActiveX Control or Form Control. We also have shown the VBA Macros method. We showed how you can assign the macro to the keyboard shortcut button. Finally, we also demonstrated how you can insert a macro button to the ribbon menu and the customized ribbon menu.  For any further queries, comment below.

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Tags: Excel Macro Button

Rubayed Razib Suprov

Rubayed Razib, holding a BSC degree in Naval Architecture & Engineering from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, serves as a devoted member of the ExcelDemy project. He has contributed significantly by authoring numerous articles and showcasing proficiency in VBA. Razib efficiently automates Excel challenges using VBA macros and actively participates in the ExcelDemy forum, providing valuable solutions for user interface challenges. Apart from creating Excel tutorials, he is interested in Data Analysis with MS Excel,... Read Full Bio

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How to run macro in Excel and create your own macro button

Svetlana Cheusheva

In this tutorial, we'll cover many different ways to run a macro in Excel - from the ribbon and VB Editor, with a custom keyboard shortcut, and by creating your own macro button.

Though running an Excel macro is a simple thing for experienced users, it might not be immediately obvious to beginners. In this article, you will learn several methods to run macros, some of which may completely change your way of interacting with Excel workbooks.

How to run a macro from Excel ribbon

One of the fastest ways to execute VBA in Excel is to run a macro from the Developer tab. If you have never dealt with VBA code before, you may need to activate the Developer tab first. And then, do the following:

Running a macro from the Developer tab

Tip. If the Developer tab is not added to your Excel ribbon, press Alt + F8 to open the Macro dialog.

Run a macro with custom keyboard shortcut

If you execute a certain macro on a regular basis, you can assign a shortcut key to it. A shortcut can be added while recording a new macro and to an existing one. For this, carry out these steps:

  • On the Developer tab, in the Code group, click Macros .

Click Options to edit the macro parameters.

  • For lowercase letters, the shortcut is Ctrl + letter .

Assign a shortcut to a macro.

  • Close the Macro dialog box.

Tip. It is recommended to always use uppercase key combinations for macros ( Ctrl + Shift + letter ) not to override the default Excel shortcuts. For example, if you assign Ctrl + f to a macro, you will lose the ability to call the Find and Replace dialog.

How to run macro from VBA Editor

If you aim to become an Excel pro, then you should definitely know how to start a macro not only from Excel, but also from the Visual Basic Editor. The good news is that it's a lot easier than you might expect :)

  • Press Alt + F11 to launch the Visual Basic Editor.
  • In the Project Explorer window on the left, double-click the module containing your macro to open it.
  • On the menu bar, click Run > Run Sub/UserForm .
  • On the toolbar, click the Run Macro button (green triangle).

Alternatively, you can use one of the following shortcuts:

  • Press F5 to run the entire code.
  • Press F8 to run each code line separately. This is very useful when testing and debugging macros.

Running a macro from the VBA Editor

Tip. If you like operating Excel from you keyboard, this tutorial may come in handy: 30 most useful Excel keyboard shortcuts .

How to create a macro button in Excel

The traditional ways of running macros are not hard, but still might present a problem if you are sharing a workbook with someone who has no experience with VBA - they simply won't know where to look! To make running a macro really easy and intuitive for anyone, create your own macro button.

Inserting a button in a worksheet

  • Click anywhere in the worksheet. This will open the Assign Macro dialogue box.

Assign a macro to a button in Excel.

  • If the text does not fit in the button, make the button control bigger or smaller by dragging the sizing handles. When finished, click anywhere on the sheet to exit the edit mode.

Excel button to run macro

Tip. You can also assign a macro to an existing button or other Form controls such as spin buttons or scrollbars. For this, right-click the control inserted in your worksheet and choose Assign Macro from the pop-up menu.

Create a macro button from a graphic object

Regrettably, it is not possible to customize the appearance of button controls, because of which the button we created a moment ago does not look very nice. To make a really beautiful Excel macro button, you can use shapes, icons, images, WordArt and other objects.

As an example, I'll show you how you can run a macro by clicking a shape:

Inserting a shape

  • In your worksheet, click where you want to insert the shape object.
  • Format your shape-button the way you want. For example, you can change the fill and outline colors or use one of the predefined styles on the Shape Format tab. To add some text to the shape, simply double-click it and start typing.

Assigning a macro to the shape

How to add a macro button to Quick Access Toolbar

The macro button inserted in a worksheet looks good, but adding a button to each and every sheet is time-consuming. To make your favorite macro accessible from anywhere, add it to the Quick Access Toolbar . Here's how:

  • Right-click the Quick Access Toolbar and choose More Commands… from the context menu.
  • In the Choose commands from list, select Macros .

Adding a macro button to Quick Access Toolbar

  • Click OK twice to close both dialog windows.

Quick Access Toolbar button to run a macro.

How to put a macro button on Excel ribbon

In case you have a few frequently used macros in your Excel toolbox, you may find it convenient to have a custom ribbon group, say My Macros , and add all popular macros to that group as buttons.

First, add a custom group to an existing tab or your own tab. For the detailed instructions, please see:

  • How to create a custom ribbon tab
  • How to add a custom group

And then, add a macro button to your custom group by performing these steps:

  • Right-click the ribbon, and then click Customize the Ribbon .
  • In the list tabs on the right, select your custom group.
  • In the Choose commands from list on the left, select Macros .
  • In the list of macros, choose the one you wish to add to the group.
  • Click the Add button.

Adding a macro to a custom ribbon group

  • Click OK to save your changes and close the main dialog box.

Three macro buttons are added to the Excel ribbon.

How to run a macro on opening a workbook

Sometimes you may want to run a macro automatically on opening a workbook, for example, to display some message, run script or clear a certain range. This can be done in two ways.

Run macro automatically by using Workbook_Open event

Below are the steps to create a macro that automatically runs whenever you open a specific workbook:

  • Open the workbook in which you want the macro to be executed.
  • Press Alt + F11 to open the Visual Basic Editor.
  • In the Project Explorer, double click ThisWorkbook to open its Code window.
  • In the Object list above the Code window, select Workbook . This creates an empty procedure for the Open event to which you can add your own code like shown in the screenshot below.

Run a macro on opening a workbook

For example, the following code will display a welcome message each time the workbook is opened:

Trigger macro on workbook opening with Auto_Open event

Another way to run a macro automatically on workbook opening is by using the Auto_Open event. Unlike the Workbook_Open event, Auto_Open() should sit in a standard code module, not in ThisWorkbook .

Here are the steps to create such a macro:

  • In the Project Explorer , right-click Modules , and then click Insert > Module .
  • In the Code window, write the following code:

A macro runs automatically whenever the workbook is opened.

Here's an example of the real-life code that displays a message box on workbook opening:

Note! The Auto_Open event is deprecated and available for backwards compatibility. In most cases, it can be replaced with the Workbook_Open event. For more information, please see Workbook_Open vs. Auto_Open .

The message box is displayed every time you open the workbook.

Now that you know lots of ways to run a macro in Excel, you just need to choose the one best suited for your needs. I thank you for reading and hope to see you on our blog next week!

You may also be interested in

  • Excel macro tutorial for beginners
  • How to record a macro in Excel
  • How to insert VBA code
  • How to enable macros in Excel
  • Personal Macro Workbook in Excel
  • User-defined functions vs VBA macros: pros and cons

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17 comments

assign a macro to button in excel

I have created a "click here to submit" button, but when the users open the document and fill out the form, once they hit submit and it transfers the document in to an email back to me, the document comes over blank. I'm not sure how to fix this as I've redone the document entirely and the same thing happens.

assign a macro to button in excel

Hi! We do not do VBA code creation or customization on request. In addition, I am not able to see the code that is in your workbook.

assign a macro to button in excel

I need my Macro to do several things, use an Ablebits feature, and then do several more things. But I can't seem to get it to record the Ablebits step.

Is there a way with VBA to include the Ablebits steps? Or, even better, a way to turn on recording them?

Hello! Unfortunately, you can't use Ablebits feature in VBA code.

assign a macro to button in excel

I have created some macro buttons on Excel Quick access toolbar. But if I move my Macro.xlam to other folder (change path), although I have already loaded Macro.xlam (by Developer/Excel Add-in), the macro buttons could not run. How could I do that only load the Macro.xlam and run the macro buttons, not depend on the file location? Thank you.

Hi! In order for Excel to find and automatically load your XLAM file, you must tell Excel where the file is located. If you have moved the file to another location, load it again by using the Developer menu.

assign a macro to button in excel

I wrote a macro to hide certain rows and columns, print a specific selection and then unhide the pertinent columns and save the workbook. All this is attached to a button. When it prints I get blank pages

Range("b1:F117").Select Selection.PrintOut Copies:=1, Collate:=True

Any suggestion regarding what I am doing wrong?

Your request goes beyond the advice we provide on this blog. If you have a specific question about the operation of a function or formula, I will try to answer it.

assign a macro to button in excel

Is it possible to assign a macro button to a toolbar that can then be opened on any pc? It seems that when I forward my document with the macro buttons added to the toolbar, they disappear when the new user opens the document however the functions are still seen as listed macros in the document.

Please help

Hi! With a usual Excel file, you cannot transfer your toolbar settings to another user.

assign a macro to button in excel

I need to run a macro to export a document to PDF, but I need to save to a different location each time I run it. Is this a possibility? I would ideally like to link this macro to a button.

Hello! To store the macros you use frequently, I recommend the Personal Macro Workbook. For more information, please visit: Personal Macro Workbook in Excel - make macros available in all workbooks .

assign a macro to button in excel

How do I format the TEXT in a macro button, say BOLD, or FONT 14,,,etc

assign a macro to button in excel

Right click/ edit text/ then just make the changes you want

assign a macro to button in excel

Hi Svetlana!

Thank you for this useful post. I created a macro spreadsheet with keyboard shortcuts. I would like to ask if it is possible to convert those shortcuts into buttons in ribbon? And then have those shortcuts removed? ( I want to share the sheet with others, but don't want them to accidentally press those keys)

assign a macro to button in excel

Yes, I found :)

assign a macro to button in excel

Good Afternoon Svetlana,

I am trying to write two separate if statements with a nested LOOKUP so the responses in the relating cells don't return with a column heading nor an #N/A reply.

The first LOOKUP statement is as follows: =LOOKUP(2,1/($O$6:$O$19=Q2),$M$6:$M$19)

If the response is an amount, it lists the last amount, but if there isn't an amount -or the range is blank, I want it to reply with 0.00

The second LOOKUP statement is as follows: =LOOKUP(2,1/(K:K""),K:K)

The response is a date, but if there has not been a payment in the affecting range, I want it to reply with "No Payment Received"

Please help. Regards, Roger

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assign a macro to button in excel

How to Assign a Macro to a Button in Excel

March 07, 2018

Running macros in your worksheet is a tremendous help. You can automate so many things with VBA that there have been countless books written on the topic. However, it’s not always so simple to run a macro. Your users may not know how to run a macro and you want to make it easy for your users to get their work done. Wouldn’t it be great to have a button on your worksheet and you can tell your users “Just click on this and such-and-such will be done automatically”?

That’s what this post is all about. Let’s get started.

Assign a Macro to a Simple Button

To begin, you’ll need to have the Developer Tab enabled. Click here for more info on that.

After you have the developer tab enabled, open up the Visual Basic Editor, add a new module and let’s add this simple code snippet in there:

This will be our simple macro to run when we click on our button.

Since we have the Developer Tab enabled, we can create a button and assign it to a macro:

  • In the Developer Tab of the ribbon, simply click on Button (in Windows, click on Insert, and then under Form Controls, click on Button)
  • Then click on the Worksheet to add the button.
  • Excel will then ask you to assign it to a macro. Use the WriteHello macro that we put in our VBE.
  • The button will then be in Edit mode. This is where you can change the text inside it. Make the text whatever you like. You can also resize the button while it is in edit mode.
  • Then click on the worksheet away from the button to get it out of edit mode. You are now able to click on your button and run the macro!

Here’s an animated gif to help illustrate the point:

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Assign a Macro to a Shape

Now that we have the main idea down, let’s add some style to our worksheet. Using the Button from the Developer Tab is not the only way to run a macro from a button. You can also use Excel Shapes!

To achieve this, we follow a similar procedure from before, but the difference is where we get our button from. Here are the steps to assign a macro to a shape in your worksheet:

  • Click on the Insert tab in the ribbon
  • Click on Shapes
  • Select a Shape (I used a rounded rectangle)
  • Click and drag on the worksheet to set the size of the shape
  • You can then write some text. You can also format this text by selecting it and going to the Home tab and adjusting the text size, center justify, and center vertically.
  • Then, right-click on the Shape and select Assign Macro.
  • Pick the macro that we wrote.
  • Then click on the worksheet to get the shape out of edit mode.
  • You can now click on your shape (which is now a button) and run your macro!

Here’s an animated gif to show more detail:

Changing the Assigned Macro

To change the macro assigned to the button, simply right-click on it, then choose Assign Macro. From there, you can select a new macro to use.

Deleting the Button

To delete the button, you need to get it back into Edit Mode. To do this, right-click on the button. When you do this, the context menu will show up. You can click back to the worksheet (but DON’T double-click!) and you will still be in Edit Mode. From here, you can hit the Delete key on your keyboard and it will remove the button.

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How to Create a Custom Macro Button in Excel

Last Updated: July 28, 2022

wikiHow is a “wiki,” similar to Wikipedia, which means that many of our articles are co-written by multiple authors. To create this article, 13 people, some anonymous, worked to edit and improve it over time. This article has been viewed 485,896 times. Learn more...

Macros in Excel can save a great deal of time with repetitive tasks. By assigning macros to custom buttons, you can save even more time by bringing your macro only one-click from execution.

Step 1 Click Tools → Customize.

  • Click File → Options → Customize Ribbons
  • Find the Developer check box in the Main Tabs section and click it. Press "OK" when you are done.

Step 2 Add

  • Go to Excel → Preferences → Ribbon (Under Sharing and Privacy)
  • Under Customize, check the box next to the Developer tab, and press "OK"

Step 2 Click on the Developer tab and click Button.

  • If you are unfamiliar with what macros are or how to record them, read more. You should have a macro already built before you create the button.

Step 5 Format the button.

Expert Q&A

  • Try using the 2003 method for Excel versions earlier than 2003. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Alternatively, you may add your macro button to an existing toolbar in versions 2003 and earlier. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • If you prefer, it will let you assign a shortcut key in the dialog box. This can prevent wrist strain and save time. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

assign a macro to button in excel

  • The user interface on versions earlier than 2003 may be different so the 2003 method may not be exactly the same for those versions. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0
  • If you want a different button image than what version 2007 offers, you will need to download additional software that specializes in modifying user interfaces for Microsoft Office. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0

You Might Also Like

Write a Simple Macro in Microsoft Excel

  • ↑ http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/excel-help/add-a-button-and-assign-a-macro-to-it-in-a-worksheet-HP010342137.aspx

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Excel Tutorial: How To Assign A Macro To A Button In Excel

Introduction.

Have you ever found yourself performing the same series of steps in Excel over and over again? This is where macros come into play. A macro is a set of instructions that can be recorded and executed to automate repetitive tasks in Excel. In this tutorial, we will explore the importance of assigning a macro to a button in Excel, allowing you to easily and quickly execute the macro with a single click.

Key Takeaways

  • Macros in Excel are sets of instructions that automate repetitive tasks.
  • Assigning a macro to a button in Excel allows for quick and easy execution with a single click.
  • Macros can be recorded, named, and saved for future use in Excel.
  • Buttons can be added to the Excel ribbon and customized for appearance and functionality.
  • Best practices for assigning macros to buttons include naming conventions and organizing for easy access.

Understanding Macros in Excel

Macros are a powerful feature in Excel that allow users to automate repetitive tasks by recording a series of commands and actions. This can save time and reduce the risk of errors in data entry or calculations.

A macro is a set of instructions that are recorded and saved for later use. These instructions can be used to automate repetitive tasks in Excel, such as formatting cells, entering data, or performing calculations.

Macros can be used to automate a wide range of tasks in Excel, such as:

Formatting:

Data entry:, calculations:, creating a macro in excel.

Macros in Excel can help automate repetitive tasks, saving you time and effort. In this tutorial, we will go through the step-by-step process of creating and assigning a macro to a button in Excel.

Recording a macro in Excel is a simple process that allows you to automate a series of actions. Here's how to do it:

  • Step 1: Open the Excel workbook where you want to create the macro.
  • Step 2: Click on the "View" tab in the Excel ribbon and then select "Macros" from the dropdown menu.
  • Step 3: Choose "Record Macro" and a dialog box will appear.
  • Step 4: In the dialog box, give your macro a name and optionally assign a shortcut key to it for quick access.
  • Step 5: Select where you want to store the macro – either in the current workbook or in the personal macro workbook for access across all workbooks.
  • Step 6: Click "OK" to start recording your actions.
  • Step 7: Perform the actions that you want to record as part of the macro.
  • Step 8: Once you have completed the actions, go back to the "View" tab and click "Macros" again. Then select "Stop Recording."

Once you have recorded the actions and saved the macro, you can easily assign it to a button for quick access. Here's how to do it:

  • Step 1: Click on the "Developer" tab in the Excel ribbon. If you don't see the Developer tab, you can enable it in Excel's options.
  • Step 2: In the Developer tab, click on the "Insert" option and select "Button" from the dropdown list.
  • Step 3: Draw the button on the Excel sheet by clicking and dragging to define its size.
  • Step 4: When the "Assign Macro" dialog box appears, select the macro you want to assign to the button and click "OK."
  • Step 5: The macro is now assigned to the button. You can test it by clicking on the button to see the recorded actions in action.

Inserting a Button in Excel

Adding a button to the Excel ribbon can be a useful way to quickly access macros or perform specific tasks with just a single click. Here's how you can easily insert a button in Excel.

  • Determine the ribbon tab: Before adding a button, decide on which ribbon tab you want the button to appear. This can be a default tab or a custom tab that you have created.
  • Select "File" and then "Options": Click on the "File" tab in Excel, and then select "Options" from the menu. This will open the Excel Options dialog box.
  • Choose "Customize Ribbon": In the Excel Options dialog box, click on "Customize Ribbon" on the left-hand side. This will display the options for customizing the ribbon.
  • Select the tab and group: In the right-hand box, choose the tab where you want to add the button. You can also create a new group within the tab if needed.
  • Add a new button: After selecting the tab and group, click on the "New Group" button to create a new group. Then, select the "Commands Not in the Ribbon" option from the left-hand box, and find the "Macro" category.
  • Insert the button: Once you have located the macro that you want to assign to the button, simply drag it and drop it into the newly created group. This will add the button to the ribbon.
  • Modify the button image: Right-click on the newly added button in the ribbon and select "Change Button Image" to choose a different icon or image for the button.
  • Edit the button text: If you want to change the text displayed on the button, you can right-click on the button and select "Edit Button Text" to modify it accordingly.
  • Assign a macro: To assign a macro to the button, right-click on the button and choose "Assign Macro" to select the specific macro from the list, and then click "OK" to confirm the selection.
  • Additional settings: You can further customize the button's functionality by adjusting its properties, such as the tooltip, size, and behavior when clicked.

Assigning a Macro to a Button

Assigning a macro to a button in Excel can greatly improve efficiency and streamline workflows. By linking a specific macro to a button, users can quickly execute complex tasks with a single click. In this tutorial, we will walk through the process of assigning a macro to a button in Excel.

Step 1: Open the Excel workbook

First, open the Excel workbook in which you want to assign a macro to a button.

Step 2: Access the Developer tab

Next, click on the "Developer" tab in the Excel ribbon. If the Developer tab is not visible, you can enable it by going to File > Options > Customize Ribbon and checking the Developer option.

Step 3: Insert a button

Once the Developer tab is visible, click on the "Insert" button in the Controls group. Then, select the "Button" option from the drop-down menu.

Step 4: Assign the macro

After inserting the button, you will be prompted to assign a macro. Select the macro that you want to link to the button from the list of available macros, and click "OK".

Step 1: Click the button

Once the macro is assigned to the button, click on the button to test whether the macro executes as intended.

Step 2: Verify the results

After clicking the button, verify that the macro performs the desired actions. If the macro does not execute properly, you may need to revisit the assignment process and ensure that the macro is correctly linked to the button.

Step 3: Make adjustments if necessary

If the macro does not work as expected, go back to the Developer tab, right-click on the button, and select "Edit Text" to make any necessary adjustments to the assigned macro.

By following these steps, you can easily assign a macro to a button in Excel, enabling quick and convenient access to specific tasks or functions within your workbook.

Best Practices for Assigning Macros to Buttons

Assigning macros to buttons in Excel can greatly improve efficiency and productivity. To ensure a smooth and organized process, it is important to adhere to best practices when naming and organizing macros and buttons. Let’s explore the recommended practices for assigning macros to buttons in Excel.

Descriptive names

When naming macros and buttons, it is essential to use descriptive names that clearly indicate their function. This makes it easier for users to understand the purpose of each macro and button.

Use of prefixes

Consider using prefixes such as "btn" for buttons and "mac" for macros to distinguish between the two. This helps in easily identifying and managing macros and buttons within the Excel workbook.

Avoid special characters

Avoid using special characters, spaces, or symbols in the names of macros and buttons. Stick to alphanumeric characters to prevent any potential issues with compatibility or functionality.

Use of separate modules

Consider organizing macros into separate modules based on their functionality or purpose. This helps in maintaining a structured and organized approach to managing and accessing macros.

Group related macros

Group together related macros and buttons, such as those associated with a specific task or process. This grouping can be done within a dedicated worksheet or module, making it convenient for users to locate the required macros and buttons.

Customize the ribbon

Utilize the Excel ribbon to create custom tabs or groups for organizing macros and buttons. This allows for a more intuitive and user-friendly interface, enabling quick access to the assigned macros.

Assigning macros to buttons in Excel is a critical skill that can greatly improve efficiency and productivity. By assigning commonly used macros to buttons, users can save time and streamline their workflow. We encourage you to practice and explore further macro and button functionality in Excel to become more proficient and efficient in your Excel usage.

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assign a macro to button in excel

Microsoft Excel:How to create, record, and run macros

M ost people rely on formulas in Excel, not the automation benefits of macros. Macros allow you to create complex data manipulations, streamline report generation, and more. Whether you're in finance, marketing, or another data-driven field, learning to write Excel macros is a game-changer. This guide demystifies Excel macros, helping you understand and use them. Macros work on PCs and Macs. If you have an affordable Chromebook , use Google Sheets and create similar programs using Google Apps Script.

What are Excel macros?

Macros in Excel are sequences of instructions that automate repetitive tasks. They are written in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), a programming language developed by Microsoft. When you record a macro, you instruct Excel to remember a series of actions you perform. After being recorded, these actions can be executed automatically with a single command.

This is useful for repeating the same task across multiple datasets, streamlining data entry, and formatting processes. Excel macros can also generate standardized reports with consistent formatting and calculations.

Macros save time and minimize the risk of human errors during repetitive data processing. They handle large volumes of data efficiently, making Excel a robust tool for personal and professional use.

How to create Excel macros

There are two ways to create macros in Microsoft Excel. The first is by recording it. The other involves writing it using VBA language. If you're new to macros, it's easier to record it than it is to write it in VBA.

Macros work on Mac and PC. However, macOS doesn't support ActiveX Controls, which are often found in some macros.

Activate the Developer tab

Before creating a macro, activate the Developer tab in Microsoft Excel. This works on PC and Mac, but the steps to activate the Developer tab differ slightly from one operating system to the other.

Here's how to activate the Developer tab on a PC:

  • Open Microsoft Excel .
  • Click the File tab , located in the upper-right corner.
  • Click Options in the lower-left corner.
  • Click the Customize Ribbon tab, located to the left of the window.
  • Tick the Developer checkbox .

Here's how to activate the Developer tab on a Mac:

  • Open the Excel preferences by pressing the Cmd + Comma ( , ) keys simultaneously on your keyboard. Alternatively, click Excel on your Mac's top menu and select Preferences .
  • Click Ribbon & Toolbar .
  • Scroll down in the list to the right, and tick the checkbox next to Developer.

After completing these steps, the Developer tab appears in the Excel ribbon, regardless of whether you're on a Mac or PC. You'll need it to use macros.

How to use Microsoft 365 (Office) on a Chromebook

Record an excel macro.

The easiest way to create a new Excel macro is by recording it. When the recording is on, all the tasks you perform are recorded. After you save the tasks, Excel automatically reproduces them for you.

Before you begin, list the tasks you want to perform to avoid mistakes. If you make an error, edit the macro's code or delete it and start over.

  • Open a new or existing Microsoft Excel spreadsheet.
  • Under the Developer tab , click the Record macro button .
  • Give your macro a name.
  • Choose where to save it. In addition to the current workbook, you can create a new one.
  • Select Personal Macro Workbook to use it in any Excel spreadsheet you open.
  • Optionally, assign it a keyboard shortcut and give it a description.
  • Click OK to start recording the macro.
  • Perform the tasks and actions for the process you want to automate. All clicks, data input, formulas, and formatting are recorded.
  • Click Stop Recording to finish. The button is under the Developer tab. It replaces the Record macro button.
  • Your macro is saved.

Write an Excel macro

You can write your macro from scratch if you're familiar with VBA. To do this, create a new macro:

  • Under the Developer tab , click Visual Basic .
  • Write your macro in VBA using the parameters you want.

How to run Excel macros

Now that you've created your Excel macros, let's see how to run them. There are two ways to do it. The first is picking the macro you want to use from the menu, which is a bit complex. If you use it often, assign a macro to a button, making it easier to run.

Access your Excel macros

To access the Excel macros you created and run them using the menus, follow the steps below:

  • Under the Developer tab , click Macros .
  • Select the macro you want to run.
  • Click Run .

Assign a button to an Excel macro

If you plan to use a specific macro often, assign it to a button. Then, place the button anywhere you want.

  • Under the Developer tab , click Button .
  • Choose the spreadsheet where you want to put the button.
  • Select the macro it needs to run.
  • To change how the button looks, right click and select Customize controls .

Do more with Microsoft Office

Microsoft Office offers productivity tools that make your day at work easier. OneNote makes note-taking a breeze and helps you keep track of them across devices. PowerPoint offers templates and themes to make presentations consistent and good-looking. If you work with spreadsheets, Excel helps you manage CSV files .

Microsoft Excel:How to create, record, and run macros

Excel Off The Grid

Browse for file path with VBA: insert value into cell

In this post, we look at how to browse for file path with VBA, and then insert the selected filepath into a cell.

This post is inspired by a question I received:

“If you would want to add a browse button right beside the cell that contains the file path so that you won’t need to manually copy and paste the file path in the cell, how would you do that?”

OK, let me show you the solution that I came up with.

The solution

Building the solution, create a named range, the vba macro, insert folder picture, assign macro to picture, test it out.

Download the example file:  Join the free Insiders Program and gain access to the example file used for this post.

File name: 0052 Insert file path into cell with Browse button.zip

Watch the video

Insert file path into a cell with Browse button | File dialog box in Excel | Excel Off The Grid

Watch the video on YouTube.

Before we look at how to build it, let’s look at the solution in action.

Cell C3 contains a file path, with a folder icon next to it.

Example solution - final version

If we click on the folder icon, the file open dialog box opens.  We can select a file and click Open.

Select File in the File Open Dialog Box - Browse for file path

The file path is now inserted into cell C3 .

Example solution - updated file path

If you’re here to find out how to do this yourself, then you’re in the right place 😁

Now we know what it does; let’s build it.

First, we need to create a named range for the cell containing the file path.

While this step isn’t essential, it reduces the risk of error. If we wrote a macro that references cell C3, then inserted a new row or column, the code in the macro doesn’t change, so it then refers to the wrong cell. Therefore, named ranges help to remove this risk.

  • Select the cell which contains the file path

Create named range

First step. Done. ✅

The main driving force for this solution is a VBA macro.

If you have the Developer ribbon visible, click Developer > Visual Basic . if not, press ALT + F11 . 

Developer - Visual Basic

The Visual Basic Editor opens.

Right-click the file in the Project window, then click Insert > Module from the menu.

Create a new module

A new code module opens. Enter the following code into the code module

Enter code into code module

The comments in the code describe the purpose of each section.

Please take careful note of the following, as you will need to change the code for your specific scenario.

ActiveSheet.Range(“filePath”).Value = dialogBox.SelectedItems(1) Change the word filePath for the named range you created above.

dialogBox.InitialFileName = “C:\Users\marks\Downloads\Example Folder” This contains the default folder path where the file picker opens each time. Change this to match your environment.

dialogBox.Filters.Clear dialogBox.Filters.Add “Excel workbooks”, “*.xlsx;*.xls;*.xlsm” This code restricts the types of files that are shown in the file picker. The asterisk ( * ) is a wildcard character; any files ending in .xlsx, .xlsx, and .xlsm will be displayed. To add new file types, PDFs for example, add “;*.pdf” into the text string. Or, to allow all file types, remove the dialogbox.Filters.Add… line completely.

Once the code has been entered and amended to your scenario, close the Visual Basic Editor by clicking on the [X] at the window’s top right.

Now we need something to act as the button. I am going to use an Icon. Depending on your version of Excel, you may not have the Icons feature. But you can insert any picture or shape you wish.

To insert an icon like me, click Insert > Icons .

Insert Icon

Search for “Folder” , in the icons window. Select the preferred icon and click Insert.

Insert Folder Icon

The image will be inserted onto the face of the worksheet.

Move and resize the image to be in the right location. I have also formatted the folder icon to be an orange color (similar to how folders look in the normal Windows environment).

Finally, we assign the macro to the image.  Right-click on the image  and select Assign macro… from the menu.

Assign Macro

From the Assign Macro window, click the selectFile macro (this is the name of the macro we created earlier), then click OK .

Select File - OK

That’s it. We’re done. Now go and test it out.

In this post, we have seen how to create a user interface for selecting files. Users can browse for a file path, then insert that into a cell. This is a really useful technique if using cell parameters in Power Query.

Related posts:

  • Change the Power Query source based on a cell value
  • How to fix the Formula.Firewall error in Power Query (2 ways)
  • VBA code to copy, move, delete and manage files

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9 thoughts on “Browse for file path with VBA: insert value into cell”

Would you like a non VBA based method of doing the above?

Using MicroSoft 365 Excel, you have the option of using a formula to pull out the file name and path from.

I use the hyperlink function starting with the path that the current file is saved it.

That side steps security having issues with ‘rogue macro’ concerns. Example: =IF(ISNA(@CELL(“filename”,B1)),”After the file is saved this formula will display the path and name”,SUBSTITUTE(LEFT(@CELL(“filename”,B1),FIND(“]”,@CELL(“filename”,B1),1)-1),”[“,””,1))

Gives you the path for the entire file. If you know you will be back to that file on a regular basis: paste the formula into the file F2 then press Enter to force recalc, copy/paste values back in my home worksheet. Trim to length for if I want to link to the folder or file desired. Wrap it in a hyperlink formula. Click save.

Here is an example that lets you click to open the folder a file is saved in.

=IF(ISNA(@CELL(“filename”,B2)),””,IF(ISERROR(FIND(“\”,@CELL(“filename”,A1),1)),HYPERLINK(LEFT(@CELL(“filename”,B2),FIND(“[“,@CELL(“filename”,B2),1)-1), “Saved in: “&MID(@CELL(“filename”,B2),FIND(“/[[“,SUBSTITUTE(@CELL(“filename”,B2),”/”,”/[[“,-1+SUMPRODUCT(LEN(CELL(“filename”,B2))-LEN(SUBSTITUTE(CELL(“filename”,B2),”/”,””)))),1)+1,(FIND(“/[“,@CELL(“filename”,B2))-2)-FIND(“/[[“,SUBSTITUTE(@CELL(“filename”,B2),”/”,”/[[“,-1+SUMPRODUCT(LEN(CELL(“filename”,B2))-LEN(SUBSTITUTE(CELL(“filename”,B2),”/”,””)))),1)+1)),HYPERLINK(LEFT(@CELL(“filename”,B2),FIND(“[“,@CELL(“filename”,B2),1)-1), “Saved in: “&MID(@CELL(“filename”,B2),FIND(“\[[“,SUBSTITUTE(@CELL(“filename”,B2),”\”,”\[[“,-1+SUMPRODUCT(LEN(CELL(“filename”,B2))-LEN(SUBSTITUTE(CELL(“filename”,B2),”\”,””)))),1)+1,(FIND(“\[“,@CELL(“filename”,B2))-2)-FIND(“\[[“,SUBSTITUTE(@CELL(“filename”,B2),”\”,”\[[“,-1+SUMPRODUCT(LEN(CELL(“filename”,B2))-LEN(SUBSTITUTE(CELL(“filename”,B2),”\”,””)))),1)+1))))

Anyhow, I was stopping by to say “Thanks for posting some interesting examples and pointers from a POV that works.”

Your writing style is a readable and effective at communicating.

Thank you for taking the time to post and make it effective.

Hello, May I know what do you mean by ActiveSheet.Range(“filePath”).Value = dialogBox.SelectedItems(1) Change the word “filePath” for the named range you created above.

In the Create Named Range step at the start, you created a named range. In the example, I used “filePath”. But if you used a different name, then you will need to change the code

Question please:

How would I change the below to just being a folder path rather than file path. Thanks. This will be very useful

Option Explicit

Sub selectFile()

‘Create and set dialog box as variable Dim dialogBox As FileDialog Set dialogBox = Application.FileDialog(msoFileDialogOpen)

‘Do not allow multiple files to be selected dialogBox.AllowMultiSelect = False

‘Set the title of of the DialogBox dialogBox.Title = “Select a file”

‘Set the default folder to open dialogBox.InitialFileName = “C:\Users\marks\Downloads\Example Folder”

‘Clear the dialog box filters dialogBox.Filters.Clear

‘Show the dialog box and output full file name If dialogBox.Show = -1 Then ActiveSheet.Range(“filePath”).Value = dialogBox.SelectedItems(1) End If

Change this:

How do you make the button insert the path of the file/folder to different cells? For instance, you have a button for Cell A1, and another for Cell A2. I know you can create 1 button for each cell but is there a way to make it easier?

You can program it to put the values into different cells. What you need first is the logic of how the button knows which cell to put the path into.

If i wanted this to be for cells, would i need to create mutliple macro modules?

Many thanks

It depends what you want to do.

Yes, you could create multiple macros.

You could, use the active cell property to identify which cell is selected – that only requires one button.

You could also use the application.caller property identify which button called macro. See this post an example. https://exceloffthegrid.com/any-macro-one-button/

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assign a macro to button in excel

Assign a macro to a button

You can use a button (a form control) to run a macro that performs an action when a user clicks it. For example, you might use a button to automate the printing of a worksheet, the filtering of data, or the calculation of numbers.

After you create a macro , you can assign it to a button you click to run the macro . You can assign a macro to a button on the Quick Access Toolbar or to a button in your own personal group on the ribbon.

If you want a macro button to be available in other workbooks, assign it to a macro that was created in a personal workbook .

Add a macro button to the Quick Access Toolbar

Click File > Options > Quick Access Toolbar .

In the Choose commands from list, click Macros .

Commands for Quick Access Toolbar

Select the macro you want to assign a button to.

Click Add to move the macro to the list of buttons on the Quick Access Toolbar.

To replace the default macro icon with a different button for your macro, click Modify .

Under Symbol , select a button icon for your macro.

Modify Button dialog box

To use a friendlier name for the button, in the Display name box, enter the name you want.

You can enter a space in the button name.

Click OK twice.

The new button appears on the Quick Access Toolbar, where you can click it to run the macro.

Tip:  When you save the workbook , buttons you assign to macros in the personal workbook will be available in every workbook you open.

Add a macro button to your own group on the ribbon

Click File > Options > Customize Ribbon .

Under Customize the Ribbon , in the Main Tabs list , check the Developer box if it is not already checked.

Customize Ribbon dialog box

Pick the tab where you want to add your own group.

For example, pick Home , to add your group to the Home tab.

Select New Group .

That adds New Group (Custom) to the tab you picked.

To use a better name for your new group, click Rename , type the name you want in the Display name box, and then click OK .

You can enter a space in the name. For example, type My Macros .

To add a macro to the group, in the Choose commands from list, click Macros .

Select the macro you want to add to your new group, and then click Add . The macro is added to the My Macros group.

To use a friendlier name, click Rename , and then type the name you want in the Display name box.

You can enter a space in the name.

Your new group appears on the tab you picked, where you can click the button to run the macro.

On the Developer tab, in the Controls group, click Button .

If the Developer tab is not available

Go to Excel > Preferences... > Ribbon & Toolbar .

In the Customize the Ribbon section, under Main Tabs , check the Developer check box, and press OK.

Click the worksheet location where you want the upper-left corner of the button to appear.

In the Assign Macro dialog box, click the name of the macro that you want to assign to the button, and then click OK .

To resize the button, drag the sizing handles.

To specify the control properties of the button, Control+Click or right-click the button, and then click Format Control .

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Macros are unavailable after clicking to view the details of a pivot table value

After pivot table show details function has been updated recently, we have noticed that once you double-click the value in a pivot table and this new sheet with all the details appears, all the buttons in excel sheets that have macros codes assigned are no longer working.

This affects not only the workbook that the pivot details view was opened in, but all the excel workbooks that are open currently, or will be opened after that.

If you go to right-click -> assign macro on the button, no macro is shown as assigned, and if you try to assign it and click ok, it doesn't actually save the macro to the button. If such workbook is saved, after closing excel completely and reopening the file the macros are all available again.

This does not affect any macros that are invoked by keyboard shortcuts or userforms.

Does anyone have any idea on how to deal with this?

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Replies (2) 

Andreas Killer

  • Volunteer Moderator

I can not reproduce that behavior. Please follow these steps: Close Excel Press and hold the CTRL key Open Excel Wait for a message to appear and ask for "Safe Mode" Release the CTRL key Click Yes After Excel opens Test the behavior

What happens?

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Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

Thanks for your feedback.

Thank you for your response.

Unfortunately, running excel in safe mode does not change this behaviour in any way.

The issue seems to be affecting all the users in our company.

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Run Multiple Macros Throws Error

  • Thread starter tomgrandy
  • Start date Wednesday at 12:46 PM
  • Wednesday at 12:46 PM

Trying to run multiple Macros at once so I can assign one button that will run three Macros sequentially. This is what I have from searching these forums: VBA Code: Sub Keywords() Call KeywordFlakedArtifacts_A_K Call KeywordFlakedArtifacts_K_Z Call KeywordNonFlakedArtifacts End Sub But it throws the following error with the Sub Keywords() highlighted when I debug:  

Attachments

Screenshot 2024-05-15 at 12.46.08 PM.png

Excel Facts

Trevor G

Well-known Member

  • Wednesday at 12:52 PM

Try changing the module name so there isn't a clash. A naming suggestion for module sheets is mod or bas before the assigned name so in your case: modKeyWords as the module sheet name and then try your routine to call the other procedures.  

  • Wednesday at 1:44 PM

Changed Module Name but still getting the error of "Expected Variable or Procedure Not Module": VBA Code: Sub modKeyWords() Call KeywordFlakedArtifacts_A_K Call KeywordFlakedArtifacts_K_Z Call KeywordNonFlakedArtifacts End Sub  

  • Wednesday at 1:53 PM

You've changed the procedure name not the module sheet names. In the project window on the top left change each module sheet name as I suspect your using the same name as each procedure name: Change KeyWordFlakedArtifacts_A_K to modKeyWordFlakedArtifacts_A_K And change the other module names not the procedures. Then your call procedure should run ok. Change the procedure back to KeyWords  

  • Thursday at 1:59 PM

assign a macro to button in excel

  • Thursday at 2:16 PM

In your screen capture (picture) you can see the folder named Modules . This folder holds each of your programming sheets called modules . This is where you should name each one with mod at the beginning, like this: modKeywordFlakedArtifacts_A_K modKeywordFlakedArtifacts_k_Z modKeywordNonFlakedArtifacts Next On each module sheet this is where I think each procedure is named as follows: KeywordFlakedArtifacts_A_K KeywordFlakedArtifacts_k_Z KeywordNonFlakedArtifacts Therefore there should be no clashing with the procedure names (you might call them macros). Therefore your call procedure should work as long as the title doesn't clash with any other name you have used. Your first thread #1 would be correct Sub Keywords() Call KeywordFlakedArtifacts_A_K Call KeywordFlakedArtifacts_K_Z Call KeywordNonFlakedArtifacts End Sub  

Did some more searching @Trevor G and discovered that I needed to repeat the Call in order for it to recognize that I was calling a Module (I think). Anyway, this is what worked: VBA Code: Sub RunALLKeyWordQueries() KeywordFlakedArtifacts_A_K.KeywordFlakedArtifacts_A_K KeywordFlakedArtifacts_K_Z.KeywordFlakedArtifacts_K_Z KeywordNonFlakedArtifacts.KeywordNonFlakedArtifacts End Sub ••••ˇˇˇˇ  

  • Thursday at 2:19 PM
  • Thursday at 2:26 PM

@Trevor G - Thank you for taking the time and helping a newb understand a bit more about VBA Scripts. Much appreciated!  

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How to Strikethrough in Excel? Easy Ways and Advanced Tips

  • Updated on May 16, 2024

Strikethrough formatting lets you show that a task is done, that data is no longer valid, or that information should no longer be considered. But how to add this strikethrough in Excel ? Here’s a complete guide for you.

Table Of Content

1. How to strikethrough in excel? 2. Strikethrough Shortcut in Excel 3. Partial Formatting with Strikethrough 4. Strikethrough with Conditional Formatting 5. How to Automatize Strikethrough Formatting? 6. Conclusion

1. How to strikethrough in excel?

You can easily add strikethrough formatting in Excel with some basic steps.

Excel-Formulas-Practice-Someka-Template-Banner

Step 1: Select the relevant cell(s)

Firstly, you should choose the cell or cells that you want to change. So, either click on a single cell or click and drag your mouse over several cells to select them all.

Step 2: Click on the Format Cells box

Secondly, you’ll open the format cell dialogue box. Therefore, you have three options: 1. Ribbon, 2. Right-click menu, 3. CTRL+1 Shortcut.

  • Ribbon Method: On the Excel ribbon, go to Home > Cells > Format Cells .

Format Cell Fetaure on Excel Ribbon

  • Right-Click: Right-click on the cell(s) you want to change and select “ Format Cells ” from the menu that appears.
  • Shortcut on Keyboard: The Format Cells dialogue box will quickly appear when you press Ctrl + 1 .

Step 3: Check the box next to Strikethrough

Lastly, on the Format Cell dialogue box, under the Fonts tab you can find Strikethrough checkbox under the effects.

strikethrough in excel

So, once you’ve chosen this option, click “OK” to give the selected cells the strikethrough look.

2. Strikethrough Shortcut in Excel

As many actions, strikethrough has also a shortcut in excel.

strikethrough shortcut in excel

After selecting the cell or range you want to strikethrough, just click on CTRL+5 on your keyboard. This will put a line on the text directly.

3. Partial Formatting with Strikethrough in Excel

The above methods strikethrough the entire text in a particular cell. But, there are times when you might only want to strikethrough a small part of the text in a cell and not the whole thing.

That’s also possible:

  • First, dive into the cell with double-click it or press F2
  • Secondly, select the part you want to strike through text in a cell

partial strikethrough in a cell in excel

  • Thirdly, open Format Cell window with CTRL 1
  • Then, go to Font > Effects > Strikethrough
  • Lastly, click OK

This method lets you keep the formatting of your text flexible, so you can highlight or underline certain parts of the cell content.

4. Strikethrough with Conditional Formatting

With conditional formatting in Excel, you can change the way something looks based on certain conditions. This is helpful for strikethrough formatting because it can do it automatically based on the state of your data.

For example, we want to strikethrough the tasks that are DONE.

strike tasks in a to do list

Firstly, select your tasks range, and go to Home > Conditional Formatting > New Rule .

We’ll use a formula to manage our rule.

Conditional Formatting to Strike Through Done Tasks

This formula says that if the adjacent cell (here it’s in the C column) is “DONE”, strikethrough the selected range (in this case it is in the B column).

Lastly, checkmark the Strikethrough option on the formatting window.

Excel Strikethrough Formatting

Now you have created a dynamic conditional formatting for your tasks.

You can also use strikethrough option with Excel checkboxes .

In this time, you’ll build your conditional formatting rule formula to check if the adjacent cell is TRUE or not.

Excek Checklist Conditional Formatting

This will create a checklist where the item turns stroked when the checkbox is marked.

5. How to Automatize Strikethrough Formatting?

If you’re using this strikethrough formatting feature too often, you might add a button to add strikethrough texts at one click.

You can add such buttons with macro, Excel Ribbon or Quick Access Toolbar.

a. Strikethrough button with a macro

You can use strikethrough formatting with just one click if you make a macro.

  • Open your VBA editor with Alt+F11
  • Go to Insert > Module to add a new module
  • Add the below code and close your editor
  • Insert a shape as your button and name it
  • Right click on the shape and select Assign macro from the menu
  • Select your strikethrough macro and click ok.

assign macro to a button

Now when you click on this button, the click cell or range will have strikethrough formatting.

b. Adding a strikethrough button to your Excel Ribbon

You can add a button to your Excel Ribbon for the strikethrough macro to make it even easier to use:

  • Right click any spot on your ribbon
  • Click Customize Ribbon

customize ribbon in excel

Next, on the Excel Options window , choose a tab (in the below example the home tab is selected) and click “ New Group ”

Add new group to excel ribbon

Then find the strikethrough command under the commands list and click Add.

add strikethrough command to excel ribbon

And click OK to save your changes. So, now you have a direct access from your ribbon.

c. Adding a Strikethrough button to Quick Access Toolbar

Again open your Excel Options window. Then, go to Quick Access Toolbar from the left-side menu. Secondly, find the Strikethrough command under the list and click on add.

add strikethrough command to excel quick access toolbar

Lastly, click on OK and save this.

Excel Quick Access Toolbar With Strikethrough Button

Now you have a strikethrough button on your Quick Access Toolbar .

That’s all for the adding automatization buttons for Excel strikethrough formatting.

6. Conclusion

Finally, the strikethrough is a flexible formatting tool in Excel that can help you better manage and arrange your data.

Thus, we have tried to explain you how to strikethrough your entire or partial text in a cell or in a range. Then, we have also given you the strikethrough shortcut so that you can apply it without using your mouse. Finally, we have also given some advanced tips on adding direct buttons for strikethrough command.

So, hope you enjoy our article on Strikethrough in Excel!

Recommended Readings:

How to use XLOOKUP Multiple Criteria in Excel?

Complete List of Things You Can Do With Excel

How to fix #VALUE! Error in Excel?

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assign a macro to button in excel

COMMENTS

  1. How to Assign a Macro to a Button in Excel (Easy Guide)

    To insert an ActiveX button and then assign a macro to it, follow the below steps: Click on the Developer tab. In the Control group, click on Insert. In the options that appear, in the ActiveX Controls options, click on the Command Button option. Click anywhere on the worksheet.

  2. Assign a macro to a Form or a Control button

    Add a button (Form control) On the Developer tab, in the Controls group, click Insert, and then under Form Controls, click Button . Click the worksheet location where you want the upper-left corner of the button to appear. The Assign Macro popup window appears. Assign a macro to the button, and then click OK.

  3. Assign a macro to a button

    Click File > Options > Quick Access Toolbar. In the Choose commands from list, click Macros. Select the macro you want to assign a button to. Click Add to move the macro to the list of buttons on the Quick Access Toolbar. To replace the default macro icon with a different button for your macro, click Modify. Under Symbol, select a button icon ...

  4. Add a Button and Assign a Macro in Excel

    To record a new macro and assign it to the button, click "Record…". This brings up the Record Macro dialog, where you specify a name and click "OK". The button will be assigned that macro. Meanwhile, Excel will remain in a recording state until you click "Stop Recording" in the "Code" section of the Developer tab.

  5. Excel Assign Macro to Button (3 Suitable Examples)

    3. Using VBA Macro to Create Excel Button and Assign Another Macro. This macro will create a macro button for the worksheet automatically and will assign the desired code to it.. We can enter the following code in the code editor and click on the Run option.; Sub AddButtonAndAssignMacro() Dim btn As Button Dim rng As Range Set rng = Range("I4:J5") Set btn = ActiveSheet.Buttons.Add(rng.Left ...

  6. How to run macro in Excel and create a macro button

    And then, do the following: On the Developer tab, in the Code group, click Macros. Or press the Alt + F8 shortcut. In the dialog box that shows up, select the macro of interest, and then click Run . Tip. If the Developer tab is not added to your Excel ribbon, press Alt + F8 to open the Macro dialog.

  7. How to Create Macro Buttons in Excel Worksheets

    Here are the steps to create the macro button: 1. Draw a shape on the sheet (Insert tab > Shapes drop-down > Rectangle shape). 2. Add text to the shape (Right-click > Edit Text | or double-click in the shape). 3. Assign the macro (Right-click the border of the shape > Assign Macro…) 4. Select the macro from the list.

  8. How to Assign a Macro to a Button in Excel

    In the Developer Tab of the ribbon, simply click on Button (in Windows, click on Insert, and then under Form Controls, click on Button) Then click on the Worksheet to add the button. Excel will then ask you to assign it to a macro. Use the WriteHello macro that we put in our VBE. The button will then be in Edit mode.

  9. 4 Ways to Create a Custom Macro Button in Excel

    7. Select Macros from the list on the left. 8. Click and drag the Custom Button icon from the list on the right to your new toolbar. The new button is represented by a smiley face. 9. Right-click on the newly added button. 10. Rename the button to your liking or leave the default name in the Name: field.

  10. Excel Tutorial: How To Assign A Macro To A Button In Excel

    Step 2: In the Developer tab, click on the "Insert" option and select "Button" from the dropdown list. Step 3: Draw the button on the Excel sheet by clicking and dragging to define its size. Step 4: When the "Assign Macro" dialog box appears, select the macro you want to assign to the button and click "OK."

  11. Excel Add VBA Button

    Adding a Form Control Button. In the Ribbon, select Developer > Insert > Form Controls > Button. Click and drag in the worksheet to create a button. As soon as you release the mouse button, the assign macro dialog box will appear. Scroll down to 1) select the macro you wish to assign to the button, and then, 2) click OK.

  12. How to Create a Macro Button in Excel

    In this video, I demonstrate how to assign a macro to a button in Excel. The video runs you through how to create a simple navigation button that when click...

  13. Assign macro with arguments to a Form Control button

    To call our lstBoxCount macro from above, the text in the Assign Macro window would be: 'lstBoxCount "Sheet1", "ListBox1"' Where Sheet1 is the name of the worksheet and ListBox1 is the name of the first ListBox. The same macro could be called from the second button, but the arguments would be different. Notice below the Listbox name has changed.

  14. How to Assign a Macro to a Button in Excel 365

    In this micro-lesson you will:- Click on the desired location for the button or draw a box with the mouse- Select the desired Macro from the list and click O...

  15. How to Make a Macro Button in Excel

    Excel tutorial on how to make a macro button in Excel. We'll go over 3 ways to do this: we'll first assign a macro to a button using a Form Control from the ...

  16. Assign on-click VBA function to a dynamically created button on Excel

    Public frm As UserForm. Dim iCount As Long. Private Sub btn_Click() iCount = IIf(iCount < 1, 1, iCount + 1) btn.Caption = "Count " & Str(iCount) As you can see, the only thing this will do is set the caption on the button to then number of times you clicked it. Next, in the form code enter the following:

  17. Assign a macro to a button using Excel and VBA

    METHOD 1. Assign a macro to a Form Control button. Right-click in a button > Select Assign Macro > Select a macro > Click OK. 1. Right-click on the Form Control button. 2. Select Assign Macro. 3. Select the macro that you want to assign to the button.

  18. Create Button Macro In Excel

    First, we develop a VBA code in the VBA Editor to filter the required data. Next, insert a rectangle using the Shapes option in the Insert tab to represent a macro button at the desired location in the sheet, say, next to cell F1.And use the options in the Format tab to format the shape features to fit our requirements.. And then, right-click the shape and choose the Assign Macro option from ...

  19. How to Add Macro Buttons to the Excel Ribbon or Quick ...

    To add a button to the ribbon, start by right-clicking anywhere on the ribbon or ribbon tabs. Then select Customize the Ribbon. This will open the Excel Options page, and Customize Ribbon should already be highlighted on the left-hand side. In the right-hand side of the Excel Options page, you will see a list of all the tabs that are currently ...

  20. How to call a macro from a button and pass arguments

    Yes, you can assign a macro to a button (or other excel controls/menu actions) and pass constant OR variable arguments to it. In the 'Assign Macro' window (right-click on object and select 'Assign Macro'): Enclose the macro name in single quotes e.g. to pass 2 constants: 'Button1_Click("A string!", 7)'. Select 'This Workbook' for the 'Macros in ...

  21. Microsoft Excel:How to create, record, and run macros

    To access the Excel macros you created and run them using the menus, follow the steps below: Under the Developer tab, click Macros. Select the macro you want to run. Click Run. Assign a button to ...

  22. Browse for file path with VBA: insert value into cell

    Assign macro to picture. Finally, we assign the macro to the image. Right-click on the image and select Assign macro… from the menu. From the Assign Macro window, click the selectFile macro (this is the name of the macro we created earlier), then click OK. Test it out. That's it. We're done. Now go and test it out. Conclusion

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    Using VBA in Excel to assign title to date ranges. 199 Can I simultaneously declare and assign a variable in VBA? Related questions. 3 Read a value from spreadsheet X, compare adjacent values between spreadsheets X and Y ... VBA Code (Copying and Pasting from one Excel Spreadsheet to another without the use of formulae) 341

  24. Video: Assign a button to a macro

    Create or delete a macro. Edit a macro. Assign a macro to a button. Create and save all your macros in a single workbook. Training: In this final video, we'll hook the macro up with a button and make it available in two places: In a custom group on the Developer tab, and on the Quick Access Toolbar.

  25. Assign a macro to a button

    Click File > Options > Quick Access Toolbar. In the Choose commands from list, click Macros. Select the macro you want to assign a button to. Click Add to move the macro to the list of buttons on the Quick Access Toolbar. To replace the default macro icon with a different button for your macro, click Modify. Under Symbol, select a button icon ...

  26. Macros are unavailable after clicking to view the details of a pivot

    If you go to right-click -> assign macro on the button, no macro is shown as assigned, and if you try to assign it and click ok, it doesn't actually save the macro to the button. If such workbook is saved, after closing excel completely and reopening the file the macros are all available again.

  27. Run Multiple Macros Throws Error

    Trying to run multiple Macros at once so I can assign one button that will run three Macros sequentially. This is what I have from searching these forums: Sub Keywords() Call KeywordFlakedArtifacts_A_K Call KeywordFlakedArtifacts_K_Z Call KeywordNonFlakedArtifacts End Sub But it...

  28. Assign Macro to Button in Excel 2010

    In this video I demonstrate how to assign a macro to a button in Excel.

  29. Strikethrough in Excel

    You can add such buttons with macro, Excel Ribbon or Quick Access Toolbar. a. Strikethrough button with a macro. You can use strikethrough formatting with just one click if you make a macro. ... Right click on the shape and select Assign macro from the menu; Select your strikethrough macro and click ok.

  30. Transfer edited rows only to new worksheet

    Here is a basic outline of how you could accomplish this using VBA: Create a Button: You can add a button to your worksheet that, when clicked, triggers the VBA code to transfer the edited or new rows. VBA Code: Write VBA code that will compare the data between the current day's worksheet and the previous day's worksheet (or any other reference ...