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What’s the Right Amount of Homework?

Decades of research show that homework has some benefits, especially for students in middle and high school—but there are risks to assigning too much.

Many teachers and parents believe that homework helps students build study skills and review concepts learned in class. Others see homework as disruptive and unnecessary, leading to burnout and turning kids off to school. Decades of research show that the issue is more nuanced and complex than most people think: Homework is beneficial, but only to a degree. Students in high school gain the most, while younger kids benefit much less.

The National PTA and the National Education Association support the “ 10-minute homework guideline ”—a nightly 10 minutes of homework per grade level. But many teachers and parents are quick to point out that what matters is the quality of the homework assigned and how well it meets students’ needs, not the amount of time spent on it.

The guideline doesn’t account for students who may need to spend more—or less—time on assignments. In class, teachers can make adjustments to support struggling students, but at home, an assignment that takes one student 30 minutes to complete may take another twice as much time—often for reasons beyond their control. And homework can widen the achievement gap, putting students from low-income households and students with learning disabilities at a disadvantage.

However, the 10-minute guideline is useful in setting a limit: When kids spend too much time on homework, there are real consequences to consider.

Small Benefits for Elementary Students

As young children begin school, the focus should be on cultivating a love of learning, and assigning too much homework can undermine that goal. And young students often don’t have the study skills to benefit fully from homework, so it may be a poor use of time (Cooper, 1989 ; Cooper et al., 2006 ; Marzano & Pickering, 2007 ). A more effective activity may be nightly reading, especially if parents are involved. The benefits of reading are clear: If students aren’t proficient readers by the end of third grade, they’re less likely to succeed academically and graduate from high school (Fiester, 2013 ).

For second-grade teacher Jacqueline Fiorentino, the minor benefits of homework did not outweigh the potential drawback of turning young children against school at an early age, so she experimented with dropping mandatory homework. “Something surprising happened: They started doing more work at home,” Fiorentino writes . “This inspiring group of 8-year-olds used their newfound free time to explore subjects and topics of interest to them.” She encouraged her students to read at home and offered optional homework to extend classroom lessons and help them review material.

Moderate Benefits for Middle School Students

As students mature and develop the study skills necessary to delve deeply into a topic—and to retain what they learn—they also benefit more from homework. Nightly assignments can help prepare them for scholarly work, and research shows that homework can have moderate benefits for middle school students (Cooper et al., 2006 ). Recent research also shows that online math homework, which can be designed to adapt to students’ levels of understanding, can significantly boost test scores (Roschelle et al., 2016 ).

There are risks to assigning too much, however: A 2015 study found that when middle school students were assigned more than 90 to 100 minutes of daily homework, their math and science test scores began to decline (Fernández-Alonso, Suárez-Álvarez, & Muñiz, 2015 ). Crossing that upper limit can drain student motivation and focus. The researchers recommend that “homework should present a certain level of challenge or difficulty, without being so challenging that it discourages effort.” Teachers should avoid low-effort, repetitive assignments, and assign homework “with the aim of instilling work habits and promoting autonomous, self-directed learning.”

In other words, it’s the quality of homework that matters, not the quantity. Brian Sztabnik, a veteran middle and high school English teacher, suggests that teachers take a step back and ask themselves these five questions :

  • How long will it take to complete?
  • Have all learners been considered?
  • Will an assignment encourage future success?
  • Will an assignment place material in a context the classroom cannot?
  • Does an assignment offer support when a teacher is not there?

More Benefits for High School Students, but Risks as Well

By the time they reach high school, students should be well on their way to becoming independent learners, so homework does provide a boost to learning at this age, as long as it isn’t overwhelming (Cooper et al., 2006 ; Marzano & Pickering, 2007 ). When students spend too much time on homework—more than two hours each night—it takes up valuable time to rest and spend time with family and friends. A 2013 study found that high school students can experience serious mental and physical health problems, from higher stress levels to sleep deprivation, when assigned too much homework (Galloway, Conner, & Pope, 2013 ).

Homework in high school should always relate to the lesson and be doable without any assistance, and feedback should be clear and explicit.

Teachers should also keep in mind that not all students have equal opportunities to finish their homework at home, so incomplete homework may not be a true reflection of their learning—it may be more a result of issues they face outside of school. They may be hindered by issues such as lack of a quiet space at home, resources such as a computer or broadband connectivity, or parental support (OECD, 2014 ). In such cases, giving low homework scores may be unfair.

Since the quantities of time discussed here are totals, teachers in middle and high school should be aware of how much homework other teachers are assigning. It may seem reasonable to assign 30 minutes of daily homework, but across six subjects, that’s three hours—far above a reasonable amount even for a high school senior. Psychologist Maurice Elias sees this as a common mistake: Individual teachers create homework policies that in aggregate can overwhelm students. He suggests that teachers work together to develop a school-wide homework policy and make it a key topic of back-to-school night and the first parent-teacher conferences of the school year.

Parents Play a Key Role

Homework can be a powerful tool to help parents become more involved in their child’s learning (Walker et al., 2004 ). It can provide insights into a child’s strengths and interests, and can also encourage conversations about a child’s life at school. If a parent has positive attitudes toward homework, their children are more likely to share those same values, promoting academic success.

But it’s also possible for parents to be overbearing, putting too much emphasis on test scores or grades, which can be disruptive for children (Madjar, Shklar, & Moshe, 2015 ). Parents should avoid being overly intrusive or controlling—students report feeling less motivated to learn when they don’t have enough space and autonomy to do their homework (Orkin, May, & Wolf, 2017 ; Patall, Cooper, & Robinson, 2008 ; Silinskas & Kikas, 2017 ). So while homework can encourage parents to be more involved with their kids, it’s important to not make it a source of conflict.

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Homework; the term elicits a myriad of responses. Students are naturally opposed to the idea of homework. No student ever says, “I wish my teacher would assign me more homework.” Most students begrudge homework and find any opportunity or possible excuse to avoid doing it.

Educators themselves are split on the issue. Many teachers assign daily homework seeing it as a way to further develop and reinforce core academic skills, while also teaching students responsibility. Other educators refrain from assigning daily homework. They view it as unnecessary overkill that often leads to frustration and causes students to resent school and learning altogether. 

Parents are also divided on whether or not they welcome homework. Those who welcome it see it as an opportunity for their children to reinforce critical learning skills. Those who loathe it see it as an infringement of their child’s time. They say it takes away from extra-curricular activities, play time, family time, and also adds unnecessary stress.

Research on the topic is also inconclusive. You can find research that strongly supports the benefits of assigning regular homework, some that denounce it as having zero benefits, with most reporting that assigning homework offers some positive benefits, but also can be detrimental in some areas.

The Effects of Homework

Since opinions vary so drastically, coming to a consensus on homework is nearly impossible. We sent a survey out to parents of a school regarding the topic, asking parents these two basic questions:

  • How much time is your child spending working on homework each night?
  • Is this amount of time too much, too little, or just right?

The responses varied significantly. In one 3 rd grade class with 22 students, the responses regarding how much time their child spends on homework each night had an alarming disparity. The lowest amount of time spent was 15 minutes, while the largest amount of time spent was 4 hours. Everyone else fell somewhere in between. When discussing this with the teacher, she told me that she sent home the same homework for every child and was blown away by the vastly different ranges in time spent completing it. The answers to the second question aligned with the first. Almost every class had similar, varying results making it really difficult to gauge where we should go as a school regarding homework.

While reviewing and studying my school’s homework policy and the results of the aforementioned survey, I discovered a few important revelations about homework that I think anyone looking at the topic would benefit from:

1. Homework should be clearly defined. Homework is not unfinished classwork that the student is required to take home and complete. Homework is “extra practice” given to take home to reinforce concepts that they have been learning in class. It is important to note that teachers should always give students time in class under their supervision to complete class work. Failing to give them an appropriate amount of class time increases their workload at home. More importantly, it does not allow the teacher to give immediate feedback to the student as to whether or not they are doing the assignment correctly. What good does it do if a student completes an assignment if they are doing it all incorrectly? Teachers must find a way to let parents know what assignments are homework and which ones are classwork that they did not complete.

2. The amount of time required to complete the same homework assignment varies significantly from student to student. This speaks to personalization. I have always been a big fan of customizing homework to fit each individual student. Blanket homework is more challenging for some students than it is for others. Some fly through it, while others spend excessive amounts of time completing it.  Differentiating homework will take some additional time for teachers in regards to preparation, but it will ultimately be more beneficial for students.

The National Education Association recommends that students be given 10-20 minutes of homework each night and an additional 10 minutes per advancing grade level. The following chart adapted from the National Education Associations recommendations can be used as a resource for teachers in Kindergarten through the 8 th grade.

It can be difficult for teachers to gauge how much time students need to complete an assignment. The following charts serve to streamline this process as it breaks down the average time it takes for students to complete a single problem in a variety of subject matter for common assignment types. Teachers should consider this information when assigning homework. While it may not be accurate for every student or assignment, it can serve as a starting point when calculating how much time students need to complete an assignment. It is important to note that in grades where classes are departmentalized it is important that all teachers are on the same page as the totals in the chart above is the recommended amount of total homework per night and not just for a single class.

Kindergarten – 4th Grade (Elementary Recommendations)

*If students are required to write the questions, then you will need to add 2 additional minutes per problem. (i.e. 1-English problem requires 4 minutes if students are required to write the sentence/question.)

5th – 8th Grade (Middle School Recommendations)

*If students are required to write the questions, then you will need to add 2 additional minutes per problem. (i.e. 1-English problem requires 5 minutes if students are required to write the sentence/question.)

Assigning Homework Example

It is recommended that 5 th graders have 50-60 minutes of homework per night. In a self-contained class, a teacher assigns 5 multi-step math problems, 5 English problems, 10 spelling words to be written 3x each, and 10 science definitions on a particular night.

3. There are a few critical academic skill builders that students should be expected to do every night or as needed. Teachers should also consider these things. However, they may or may not, be factored into the total time to complete homework. Teachers should use their best judgment to make that determination:

  • Independent Reading – 20-30 minutes per day
  • Study for Test/Quiz - varies
  • Multiplication Math Fact Practice (3-4) – varies - until facts are mastered
  • Sight Word Practice (K-2) – varies - until all lists are mastered

4. Coming to a general consensus regarding homework is almost impossible.  School leaders must bring everyone to the table, solicit feedback, and come up with a plan that works best for the majority. This plan should be reevaluated and adjusted continuously. What works well for one school may not necessarily be the best solution for another.

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How Much Time Should Be Spent on Homework Based on Grade?

  • 18 July 2020
  • Posted by: ryan
  • Category: Tutoring

A common question that parents always ask is, “How much time should my child dedicate to homework every day?” It’s not an easy question to answer. As we all know, every student learns differently from each other. While some kids do, substantially, better in school, by completing one hour of homework every day. There might be some others, who require two hours of homework, but only see a slight improvement in their grades.

To get to the bottom of this, we went to the experts for the answers! So here’s a break down of how much time your child should spend on homework according to their grade.

What is The Recommended Homework Time in Elementary School?

So before we give you a solid figure. We took a look at the results of a May 2012 study from the Los Angeles Unified School District . (Figure 1 below)

8th grade hours of homework

If your child is starting out in kindergarten and they receive some basic worksheets to complete for homework, the standard time they should spend on completing homework is 10 minutes per night.

Keep in mind, kindergarten childen might have shorter attention spans, than older kids, and might need a few intervals in between to complete their homework. So let them do it for 5 minutes, then take a 5 minute break, then continue for another 5 minutes to complete.

Usually,  Grade 1 – 3 students receive one to three homework assignments per week. They suggest that your child spend at least 20 – 30 minutes per night on homework.

Grade 4 – 5 students who receive two to four assignments per week, should focus between 40 – 50 minutes on completing each assignment.

What is The Recommended Homework Time in Middle and High school?

As your child enters middle and high school, naturally, their home work time will increase. As subjects get harder and more information needs to be retained for exams, more time is needed to practice. Here are the home work time estimations for older students from the Los Angeles Unified School District . (Figure 2 below)

8th grade hours of homework

Students in middle school are from Grades 6 – 8.  As class subjects require more attention and practice, middle school students get assigned three to five sets of assignments per week. We recommend that your child spend between 45 – 75 minutes per night.

Once your child is in highschool, Grade 9 – 12 students usually receive four to five sets of homework per week. According to Figure 2,  high school students should focus about 25-30 minutes on each subject.

For example, if your child is in Grade 10 and has a Math and English assignment to do for homework, they should spend at least 30 minutes on English and 30 minutes on Math. If they take one or two short breaks, it works out to be 75 – 150 minutes per set to complete both assignments.

Get Homework Help For Your Kids At ICan Education! 

8th grade hours of homework

Does your child need help completing their homework? ICan Education can help as we offer flexible Homework Help with tutors in Brampton, Mississauga, Milton, and Burlington!

ICAN Education tutoring centre has several locations in the GTA West, Mississauga, Brampton, Milton, and Burlington. To locate the closest ICAN Education centre near you, click  here .

Do you have any tips to share with other parents and students about completing homework? Let us know by posting your comments below and let’s move the conversation to our Twitter Page @icanedu. Don’t forget to ‘Like’  ICAN Education’s Facebook  and say ‘hi!’!

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8th grade hours of homework

How Much Homework Is Enough? Depends Who You Ask

African American boy studies for science test from home

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Editor’s note: This is an adapted excerpt from You, Your Child, and School: Navigate Your Way to the Best Education ( Viking)—the latest book by author and speaker Sir Ken Robinson (co-authored with Lou Aronica), published in March. For years, Robinson has been known for his radical work on rekindling creativity and passion in schools, including three bestselling books (also with Aronica) on the topic. His TED Talk “Do Schools Kill Creativity?” holds the record for the most-viewed TED talk of all time, with more than 50 million views. While Robinson’s latest book is geared toward parents, it also offers educators a window into the kinds of education concerns parents have for their children, including on the quality and quantity of homework.

The amount of homework young people are given varies a lot from school to school and from grade to grade. In some schools and grades, children have no homework at all. In others, they may have 18 hours or more of homework every week. In the United States, the accepted guideline, which is supported by both the National Education Association and the National Parent Teacher Association, is the 10-minute rule: Children should have no more than 10 minutes of homework each day for each grade reached. In 1st grade, children should have 10 minutes of daily homework; in 2nd grade, 20 minutes; and so on to the 12th grade, when on average they should have 120 minutes of homework each day, which is about 10 hours a week. It doesn’t always work out that way.

In 2013, the University of Phoenix College of Education commissioned a survey of how much homework teachers typically give their students. From kindergarten to 5th grade, it was just under three hours per week; from 6th to 8th grade, it was 3.2 hours; and from 9th to 12th grade, it was 3.5 hours.

There are two points to note. First, these are the amounts given by individual teachers. To estimate the total time children are expected to spend on homework, you need to multiply these hours by the number of teachers they work with. High school students who work with five teachers in different curriculum areas may find themselves with 17.5 hours or more of homework a week, which is the equivalent of a part-time job. The other factor is that these are teachers’ estimates of the time that homework should take. The time that individual children spend on it will be more or less than that, according to their abilities and interests. One child may casually dash off a piece of homework in half the time that another will spend laboring through in a cold sweat.

Do students have more homework these days than previous generations? Given all the variables, it’s difficult to say. Some studies suggest they do. In 2007, a study from the National Center for Education Statistics found that, on average, high school students spent around seven hours a week on homework. A similar study in 1994 put the average at less than five hours a week. Mind you, I [Robinson] was in high school in England in the 1960s and spent a lot more time than that—though maybe that was to do with my own ability. One way of judging this is to look at how much homework your own children are given and compare it to what you had at the same age.

Many parents find it difficult to help their children with subjects they’ve not studied themselves for a long time, if at all.

There’s also much debate about the value of homework. Supporters argue that it benefits children, teachers, and parents in several ways:

  • Children learn to deepen their understanding of specific content, to cover content at their own pace, to become more independent learners, to develop problem-solving and time-management skills, and to relate what they learn in school to outside activities.
  • Teachers can see how well their students understand the lessons; evaluate students’ individual progress, strengths, and weaknesses; and cover more content in class.
  • Parents can engage practically in their children’s education, see firsthand what their children are being taught in school, and understand more clearly how they’re getting on—what they find easy and what they struggle with in school.

Want to know more about Sir Ken Robinson? Check out our Q&A with him.

Q&A With Sir Ken Robinson

Ashley Norris is assistant dean at the University of Phoenix College of Education. Commenting on her university’s survey, she says, “Homework helps build confidence, responsibility, and problem-solving skills that can set students up for success in high school, college, and in the workplace.”

That may be so, but many parents find it difficult to help their children with subjects they’ve not studied themselves for a long time, if at all. Families have busy lives, and it can be hard for parents to find time to help with homework alongside everything else they have to cope with. Norris is convinced it’s worth the effort, especially, she says, because in many schools, the nature of homework is changing. One influence is the growing popularity of the so-called flipped classroom.

In the stereotypical classroom, the teacher spends time in class presenting material to the students. Their homework consists of assignments based on that material. In the flipped classroom, the teacher provides the students with presentational materials—videos, slides, lecture notes—which the students review at home and then bring questions and ideas to school where they work on them collaboratively with the teacher and other students. As Norris notes, in this approach, homework extends the boundaries of the classroom and reframes how time in school can be used more productively, allowing students to “collaborate on learning, learn from each other, maybe critique [each other’s work], and share those experiences.”

Even so, many parents and educators are increasingly concerned that homework, in whatever form it takes, is a bridge too far in the pressured lives of children and their families. It takes away from essential time for their children to relax and unwind after school, to play, to be young, and to be together as a family. On top of that, the benefits of homework are often asserted, but they’re not consistent, and they’re certainly not guaranteed.

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How Much Homework Do American Kids Do?

Various factors, from the race of the student to the number of years a teacher has been in the classroom, affect a child's homework load.

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In his Atlantic essay , Karl Taro Greenfeld laments his 13-year-old daughter's heavy homework load. As an eighth grader at a New York middle school, Greenfeld’s daughter averaged about three hours of homework per night and adopted mantras like “memorization, not rationalization” to help her get it all done. Tales of the homework-burdened American student have become common, but are these stories the exception or the rule?

A 2007 Metlife study found that 45 percent of students in grades three to 12 spend more than an hour a night doing homework, including the six percent of students who report spending more than three hours a night on their homework. In the 2002-2003 school year, a study out of the University of Michigan found that American students ages six through 17 spent three hours and 38 minutes per week doing homework.

A range of factors plays into how much homework each individual student gets:

Older students do more homework than their younger counterparts.

This one is fairly obvious: The National Education Association recommends that homework time increase by ten minutes per year in school. (e.g., A third grader would have 30 minutes of homework, while a seventh grader would have 70 minutes).

Studies have found that schools tend to roughly follow these guidelines: The University of Michigan found that students ages six to eight spend 29 minutes doing homework per night while 15- to 17-year-old students spend 50 minutes doing homework. The Metlife study also found that 50 percent of students in grades seven to 12 spent more than an hour a night on homework, while 37 percent of students in grades three to six spent an hour or more on their homework per night. The National Center for Educational Statistics found that high school students who do homework outside of school average 6.8 hours of homework per week.

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Race plays a role in how much homework students do.

Asian students spend 3.5 more hours on average doing homework per week than their white peers. However, only 59 percent of Asian students’ parents check that homework is done, while 75.6 percent of Hispanic students’ parents and 83.1 percent of black students’ parents check.

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Teachers with less experience assign more homework.

The Metlife study found that 14 percent of teachers with zero to five years of teaching experience assigned more than an hour of homework per night, while only six percent of teachers with 21 or more years of teaching experience assigned over an hour of homework.

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION]

Math classes have homework the most frequently.

The Metlife study found that 70 percent of students in grades three to 12 had at least one homework assignment in math. Sixty-two percent had at least one homework assignment in a language arts class (English, reading, spelling, or creative writing courses) and 42 percent had at least one in a science class.

Regardless of how much homework kids are actually doing every night, most parents and teachers are happy with the way things are: 60 percent of parents think that their children have the “right amount of homework,” and 73 percent of teachers think their school assigns the right amount of homework.

Students, however, are not necessarily on board: 38 percent of students in grades seven through 12 and 28 percent of students in grades three through six report being “very often/often” stressed out by their homework.

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How Much Time Should Be Spent on Homework?

Student doing homework with clock

At the elementary level homework should be brief, at your child’s ability level and involve frequent, voluntary and high interest activities. Young students require high levels of feedback and/or supervision to help them complete assignments correctly. Accurate homework completion is influenced by your child’s ability, the difficulty of the task, and the amount of feedback your child receives. When assigning homework, your child’s teachers may struggle to create a balance at this age between ability, task difficulty and feedback. Unfortunately, there are no simple guiding principles.

We can assure you, however, that your input and feedback on a nightly basis is an essential component in helping your child benefit from the homework experience.

What is the recommended time in elementary school?

In first through third grade, students should receive one to three assignments per week, taking them no more than fifteen to twenty minutes. In fourth through sixth grade, students should receive two to four assignments per week, lasting between fifteen and forty-five minutes. At this age, the primarily goal of homework is to help your child develop the independent work and learning skills that will become critical in the higher grades. In the upper grades, the more time spent on homework the greater the achievement gains.

What is the recommended time in middle and high school?

For students in middle and high school grades there are greater overall benefits from time engaged in practicing and thinking about school work. These benefits do not appear to depend as much upon immediate supervision or feedback as they do for elementary students. In seventh through ninth grade we recommend students receive three to five sets of assignments per week, lasting between forty-five and seventy-five minutes per set. In high school students will receive four to five sets of homework per week, taking them between seventy-five and 150 minutes per set to complete.

As children progress through school, homework and the amount of time engaged in homework increases in importance. Due to the significance of homework at the older age levels, it is not surprising that there is more homework assigned. Furthermore, homework is always assigned in college preparatory classes and assigned at least three quarters of the time in special education and vocational training classes. Thus at any age, homework may indicate our academic expectations of children.

Regardless of the amount of homework assigned, many students unsuccessful or struggling in school spend less rather than more time engaged in homework. It is not surprising that students spending less time completing homework may eventually not achieve as consistently as those who complete their homework.

Does this mean that time devoted to homework is the key component necessary for achievement?

We are not completely certain. Some American educators have concluded that if students in America spent as much time doing homework as students in Asian countries they might perform academically as well. It is tempting to assume such a cause and effect relationship.

However, this relationship appears to be an overly simple conclusion. We know that homework is important as one of several influential factors in school success. However, other variables, including student ability, achievement, motivation and teaching quality influence the time students spend with homework tasks. Many students and their parents have told us they experience less difficulty being motivated and completing homework in classes in which they enjoyed the subject, the instruction, the assignments and the teachers.

The benefits from homework are the greatest for students completing the most homework and doing so correctly. Thus, students who devote time to homework are probably on a path to improved achievement. This path also includes higher quality instruction, greater achievement motivation and better skill levels.

Authors: Dr. Sam Goldstein and Dr. Sydney Zentall

8th grade hours of homework

MiddleWeb

  • Articles / Homework

What Teachers Need to Know about Homework

by MiddleWeb · Published 11/06/2022 · Updated 01/11/2023

Having my own child in middle school the past few years has provided my teacher self some fresh, brutally honest insight into the perspective of a middle school student. I have learned a lot from listening to Lily’s opinions and ideas.

Recently we’ve talked a lot about homework. Our conversations – and seeing firsthand what it’s like for her to get home late from sports and then try to do homework before bedtime – inspired me to ask her if she’d be willing to share her ideas and experiences with teachers. She was eager and excited. I’m happy to introduce my daughter and her thoughts on homework. – Kasey Short

By Lily Strickland

8th grade hours of homework

Lily Strickland

Dear Middle School Teachers,

As an 8th grade student, I think it would be helpful for you to hear a kid’s perspective and advice about homework.

I know my teachers care about their students, but I am not sure they always understand the impact of assigning homework on students and what it is really like for kids my age when they get home from school.

Being a middle school kid is stressful, and when we have hours of homework it adds lots of stress. Teachers say they are giving homework to help us learn, but when we feel this kind of stress it lowers our performance on the homework and school in general.

This stress also impacts our mood and can make it difficult to sleep because we are worried. Homework is also often the main reason that students are not getting enough sleep and then have a more difficult time focusing the next day in class and finding the energy to do well at sports practice.

Since the start of middle school teachers have given the advice that we should put our cell phones away while doing schoolwork and warn us about technology distracting us from homework. What I am not sure they realize is that many of the reasons it is difficult for us to focus at home are out of our control. We go home to siblings, pets, and parents who are distracting and loud, want our attention, and often don’t understand how much work we need to do.

Teachers also talk about time management but don’t seem to understand how little time we have. Most nights after sports practice, I have around two and a half hours between when I get home and when I should go to bed. That is not a lot of time to shower, have dinner, get ready for the next day, and do between one and two hours of homework.

Teachers also need to know that when work is done at home it isn’t always done by the student. When we do work at school, students think about the questions and work through it themselves. At home they are often tired and stressed and sometimes resort to looking up the answer online or asking their friends for answers. That then puts other kids in a bad position of having to tell their friends they won’t help or risk getting in trouble.

Six ideas for teachers

8th grade hours of homework

Photo by Simeon Frank on Unsplash

I do understand that there are times when kids need to do schoolwork at home, and I think there are a few things some teachers do and other teachers could try that are good and would help kids.

1. When assigning practice problems or activities consider how much practice kids need and make some of the practice optional for those who need it most. It helps me to practice things like math and vocab, but there is often more assigned than I need to do to feel confident I know how to do the work.

2. Please don’t introduce new concepts in homework assignments. It is stressful to try something new without your teacher when you are tired from a long day and dealing with distractions at home.

3. We often learn just as much in classes that give very little or no homework as classes that give homework every night! The teachers can teach us as much information by using the time in class effectively and spending all the time focusing on learning. Kids appreciate teachers who don’t waste time in class or don’t let other kids take over and distract everyone.

4. It is really helpful when teachers give more than one day to complete homework assignments or give the assignments in advance. This lets kids plan around sports and other after school activities. Many homework assignments are given one day and due the next day, and kids have to complete all the work that night regardless of what other things are going on or how late they got home.

5. Weekend homework is better than weekday homework. Even on the busiest weekend, I have more time in those two days than in a single school night. (Ask your students about this.)

6. Teachers always want kids to read but don’t realize that by the time we have finished all our other homework we are often too tired to read for fun. Instead of specific homework, teachers could encourage reading for fun. I know that for me reading reduces stress and I learn a lot as well. It would be important if teachers did this to remember that reading is difficult for some students and that audiobooks would be a great option for them.

Can homework be graded fairly?

8th grade hours of homework

When we do work at school, we all are in the same environment and have the same adults who can help us and hold us accountable. Once we take the work home everyone’s situation is different.

I know some kids have parents who basically do their homework or at least give them more help than I bet teachers know about . Other kids may not have that kind of help or have stressful things going on at home that make it difficult for them to focus.

Lily Strickland 8th Grade Student

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Homework has a very low score on John Hattie’s researched list of instructional methods. I have been very successful with non-homework. I spend 10 minutes explaining and the students spend 40 minutes working while I wander around and help, supervise, organize, and direct. They help each other. The one-sheet two-sided assignment is due at the end of the period, and it is graded. I go home 30 minutes after the kids, and all my papers are graded. My math students improve 2.5 to 3 grade levels in one year (every year). Other teachers who use the non-homework approach achieve similar results.

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How To: Choose the Right Amount of Daily Homework

Despite the differences in the recommendations from these sources, the table shows broad agreement about how much homework to assign at each grade. At grades 1-3, homework should be limited to an hour or less per day, while in grades 4-6, homework should not exceed 90 minutes. The upper limit in grades 7-8 is 2 hours and the limit in high school should be 2.5 hours.

Teachers can use the homework time recommendations included here as a point of comparison: in particular, schools should note that assigning homework that exceeds the upper limit of these time estimates is not likely to result in additional learning gains--and may even be counter-productive (Cooper, Robinson, & Patall, 2006).

It should also be remembered that the amount of homework assigned each day is not in itself a sign of high academic standards. Homework becomes a powerful tool to promote learning only when students grasp the purpose of each homework assignment, clearly understand homework directions, perceive that homework tasks are instructionally relevant, and receive timely performance feedback (e.g., teacher comments; grades) on submitted homework (Jenson, Sheridan, Olympia, & Andrews, 1994).

Attachments

  • Download This Blog Entry in PDF Format: How To: Choose the Right Amount of Daily Homework
  • Barkley, R. A. (2008). 80+ classroom accommodations for children or teens with ADHD. The ADHD Report, 16 (4), 7-10.
  • Cooper, H., Robinson, J. C., & Patall, E A. (2006). Does homework improve academic achievement? A synthesis of research, 1987-2003. Review of Educational Research, 76 (1), 1-62. 
  • Jenson, W. R., Sheridan, S. M., Olympia, D., & Andrews, D. (1994). Homework and students with learning disabilities and behavior disorders: A practical, parent-based approach. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 27 , 538-548.

These Are the Hours Your Kid Should Be Homeschooling Per Day Based on Their Grade

Updated on 4/22/2020 at 4:30 PM

8th grade hours of homework

The pressure to homeschool is at a fever pitch, particularly as more and more states are announcing sweeping school closures until the fall. And with such polarizing guidance, it's easy for parents to look at a typical seven-hour school day and assume that they simply aren't doing enough.

In late March, the Illinois State Board of Education released "remote learning recommendations" in order to provide clarification to districts, schools, teachers, students, and parents as to what virtual education should look like during the "COVID-19 emergency."

And within this 60-page document, perhaps the most helpful section was a small chart outlining the "suggested minimum and maximum times of engagement by each student in remote learning activities." Broken down by grade level, it gives parents achievable benchmarks for how much time should be spent doing remote learning each day:

8th grade hours of homework

In addition to the time parameters, it also outlined how additional engagement opportunities – versus strict remote learning assignments – are especially vital for preschool and elementary grade levels, where it is not "developmentally appropriate to expect a student to attend to academic tasks for a long period of time." For those kids, the organization offered up a separate table of activities and noted that families are "encouraged" to support learning via these methods instead.

Illinois's Board of Education said it created these recommendations because it "acknowledges that all students, families, and schools are diverse and supports remote learning that meets local needs, and to the greatest extent possible, minimizes the negative impact this unprecedented moment has on our students' educational trajectories."

And although these guidelines might vary state to state, it serves as a helpful baseline for those parents who have been trying to fill full school days when they should actually be homeschooling a lot less.

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Challenge Success

What Teaching 8th Graders Has Taught Me About Homework and Stress

This is my first year as a full time teacher, after working for many years in education as a part-time teacher, researcher, and coach with Challenge Success. Throughout the year I’ve seen the complexities and nuances of how student stress works up close. Stress doesn’t just come from one place. It’s not only teachers assigning too much homework, or a hectic school schedule, or one too many extracurricular activities. It’s deeper than any one of those things. It’s cultural, and it’s something we not only feel, but also go in search of.

In an odd way, I feel like we take a certain pride in being busy. Hard work, it goes without saying, is admirable, and it’s far better to work too hard than not work hard enough. For example, as a teacher I rarely feel compelled to say to a student, “Hey Hector, you worked too hard on this. Try taking it easier next time.” The implication of this would be, “this assignment is too well done, too thorough, too neat.” On the other hand it’s not uncommon to say, “Jacob, this feels rushed. Did you put in enough effort? Did you save it for the last minute?”

Students pick up on this distinction, which comes not only from feedback on turned-in work, but from their parents, their peers, television shows they watch, books they read, and even video games they play (populated as they are with tireless heroes and villains who are sometimes evil, sometimes admirable, but never lazy). Stress itself is not admirable, per se, but busy-ness is, and busy-ness turns into stress easily.

So there is no simple origin for stress, and hence there is no one panacea, one thing I can do, as a teacher, to reduce the stress of my students when they secretly want to be able to say how busy they are, when their parents want them to do well in school, and when students themselves make choices – like saving work for the last minute – which unduly increase stress. What’s more, 8 th graders live intensely dramatic social lives, where friendships rise and fall in days, crushes are not-always-closely-guarded secrets, and the adolescent germs of independence-seeking youthful rebellion are starting to grow. In short, it’s hard being 14 even without school.

This year my 8 th graders have taught me how complicated their stress is, and they’ve also shown me that there are little things I can do to improve their experience. The following are three big ideas that I had considered in the abstract before – as a coach with Challenge Success, and as a student and researcher – but which now carry the weight of experience. They’re not panaceas or solutions, in themselves. Rather, they are all important ideas to keep in mind when thinking about how to tackle the difficult issue of student stress.

1) Some stress can be good. Students want rigor and want to feel motivated. My students do best when they feel challenged. Reading the difference between paralyzed and overwhelmedand intimidated but up for it is not always easy, but it’s worth it to figure out the markers for each and every student. A challenged student is a motivated student, and reducing stress cannot mean reducing rigor, because that leads to disengagement and boredom, which in turn makes school more stressful. It is no accident that my students feel most stressed not when they have the most or most difficult work to do, but rather when they are not convinced that the work they have to do is worthwhile.

2) It’s not easy to tell how much homework students actually do. Make sure you find out the whole story. Anyone who has taught middle school knows that some students complain about everything, and especially how much homework they have. At one point this year I asked one of my more grumpy students how much homework she has on a typical night, worried that maybe me and my fellow 8th grade teachers were overdoing it. “Oh,” she said, “About 45 minutes.” I thought about this for a minute. Not only do we have an hour-long ‘homework period’ – a quiet time for students to work independently – at the end of our school day, but this student also spends the next hour in study hall after school. I responded, “So, basically you have enough time to finish it in homework period and study hall every day, so you’re done before you go home at 4.” She said, “Yeah, that’s right,” and left it at that. “So much homework” didn’t mean “more than I can do,” or, “so much that it takes away from family time.” I was relieved. I also realized that, for a student who has been at a school where we make a point of limiting homework load and craft assignments that are never busywork and always requires thinking this was a lot of work, but totally doable.

On the flip side, some students will quietly spend hours and hours on assignments that were meant to be finished in a fraction of that time. I have another student who routinely turns in work to me, digitally, well after midnight. In speaking to him, I’ve learned that he spends hours and hours in sports practices, and is such a perfectionist about his school work that he’ll easily put in double or triple the time his classmates do on each assignment. Add in his serial procrastination and you have a recipe for a classic over-stressed student: too much to do, too little sleep. Add in, in his case, the added complication that he never offers a word of complaint. Indeed, if you ask him, he’ll say that he wants to work so hard. There’s no easy solution here, as this student is a classic example of broader cultural values at work, but fact finding and recognizing that the problem exists is a key first step.

3) Giving students time to get work done is not enough; you have to teach them to use that time effectively. My school’s hour long homework period is, I think, a particularly brilliant idea, but it only works if it’s implemented properly. What does “properly” mean? Middle school students, no matter how engaged they are by their curriculum and class projects, need structure and support from teachers to work effectively. I’ve come to understand that running homework period is possibly the most important part of my job, because it’s a time when I can teach, on an individual basis, skills that go way beyond my Language Arts curriculum. I can teach resilience, when to ask for help (and when to figure it out yourself), how to stay organized, and how to prioritize tasks. Being firm and consistent with expectations for student use of homework period – and following through on those expectations – makes student experience effective. Improperly implemented, homework period could simply be an hour-long socialization and decompression time for students. That would have some merits, but perhaps the best way to reduce stress is to get the stressful work done (and how much smaller does it usually seem when it’s done!). Homework period allows students to do that, as long as the atmosphere the teacher establishes is a productive one.

Reducing stress and improving the student experience isn’t about making school easy. It’s about setting high expectations, providing meaningful learning opportunities, and ensuring that students can succeed at meeting real challenges. It’s about finding out the truth from students, knowing what they want, what they need, and when those things are either in concert or in contradiction. It’s about teaching students to be positive and productive, teaching them to prioritize and make effective use of their time, and teaching them to be reflective and self-aware. It’s not easy, but it’s worth the effort.

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Confessions of a Homeschooler

8th Grade Homeschool Schedule

8th Grade Homeschool Schedule

Hi everyone! I’ve had a lot of requests to see what my 8th grader’s homeschool day looks like. So today I’m sharing her schedule with you. Keep in mind, this is a flexible schedule. Some days a subject might take her longer than others. And so she may finish a little earlier, or later depending on her workload for the day. She currently has an average of 4-5 hours of school per day, plus sports in the afternoons. So far this schedule is working well for her.

8thgradehomeschoolschedule

Now I know I have homework listed on her schedule, and some of you are probably wondering about that. She uses this time to catch up on any work she didn’t finish during the day, as well as work on her writing assignments. We’re doing IEW Writing and we’ll usually watch the video during class on the first day, sometimes it takes two days to complete longer videos. Then she’ll get a writing assignment that will be due later in the week or the following week depending. So she uses her homework time to work on those assignments.

She will also occasionally have homework from her options program, and so she can work on it during her homework time as well.

8thgradedailyschedule

Download a copy:

  • 8th Grade Daily Schedule – PDF
  • 8th Grade Daily Schedule – Word Doc (Editable)

Here’s our Basic 8th Grade S chedule:

  • 8:30am – Breakfast
  • 9:00am –  Bible
  • 9:15am – Math
  • 9:30am – English
  • 10:40am – Spelling
  • 11:00am – Art/Drawing (Mon),  Writing (T-TH)
  • 12:00pm – Lunch
  • 12:45pm – Typing
  • 1:00pm – Literature
  • 1:30pm – History 
  • 2:00pm – Science
  • 2:45pm – Homework
  • 4:30pm – Swimming

Strawberry Shortcake also participates in our weekly options program and this year she gets to do cooking, problem solving/game theory, robotics, and choir. It should be a fun year for her.

If you’d like to see what specific curriculum she’s using this year, make sure to check out our 2016-2017 8th grade curriculum post!

Check out our other homeschool daily schedules here!

These are just the basic schedules that have worked for us over the years. Of course your schedule will vary based on the curriculum you’re using, and what fits the needs of your family best.

  • Preschool Homeschool Schedule
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17 Comments

Great schedule! Do you spell out what is to be done each day?

Yes, they get a weekly assignment sheet that is more specific, so they check off items each day as they complete them.

Awesome!! I’m seriously thinking of homeschooling my 5th grader and your blog has helped me with a lot of questions I have. Scheduling was one.

Erica just wonder where you get all the supplies you get for chalk painting including brushes

You can find them online, but we have a local store here that I went to so I could see all of the colors in person. You might do an internet search to see if you have a chalk paint store in your area 🙂

Hi Erica! Just wondering would be posting an updated schedule for the other grades as well?

Thank you!!

Hi Erica! Love your blog! I’m curious about the “options” program. Is this a co-op? Does your daughter participate outside of your house? Thanks for your help!

Yes, we do a once a week program that takes place outside of our home. They mostly do elective classes, they change each year depending on what they offer.

Hi Erika, We also have a day in our week where the kids to classes outside of the home. I struggle with Abeka to complete their curriculum (for History/Science for your 7th/8th graders) while doing a 4 day a week program. How do you manage that?

We do not usually complete the entire Abeka curriculum each year because we do a 4 day work week as well. It depends on the subject as to how we get through it. For the older kids doing History, it is too much work to double up on assignments, and so we just went through and chose which chapters we wanted to complete and did our schedule that way. That does mean we’re missing a few chapters, but we’ll pick them up in a later year. For my younger one I usually skip worksheets here and there as they duplicate in topics that she’s doing well in. It’s a little more abstract to do it that way, but it works for us.

In the past we have done our work in the morning from 10-1 but this year with added activities, I need the kids to get more work done two days a week than other days. In the past we have really struggled with getting the kids and myself back to work after lunch. Any tips? TIA

Ya, we have that same problem! It also depends on when we eat lunch. If we eat around 11 it’s easier to get back to work. Some days the kids choose to just finish school and eat around 1 or so instead. It just depends on the day. I would suggest starting at 9 instead of 10. It’s always easier to get things done in the morning than in the afternoon we’ve found 🙂

Hey I’m homeschooled 8th grade and my planner is the exact same just not the swimming

Erica, I’m new to homeschooling and have an 8th grader. I was curious as to the difference between English and Literature? I’ll be doing spelling and vocabulary together and then am using a program that has a lot of reading on timeless classics both fiction and nonfiction and poetry. I considered that to be part of English. So I’m wondering if I’m missing something since you have both English and Literature on your daily schedule. Thanks

English is more grammar, verbs, nouns, punctuation, sentence formation. Literature is reading/analyzing/reporting on classic literature pieces.

I see that you leave 15 minutes for math. Does she complete all of her math during that amount of time?

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8th grade hours of homework

How Much Homework Is Too Much for Our Teens?

Here's what educators and parents can do to help kids find the right balance between school and home.

Does Your Teen Have Too Much Homework?

Today’s teens are under a lot of pressure.

They're under pressure to succeed, to win, to be the best and to get into the top colleges. With so much pressure, is it any wonder today’s youth report being under as much stress as their parents? In fact, during the school year, teens say they experience stress levels higher than those reported by adults, according to a previous American Psychological Association "Stress in America" survey.

Odds are if you ask a teen what's got them so worked up, the subject of school will come up. School can cause a lot of stress, which can lead to other serious problems, like sleep deprivation . According to the National Sleep Foundation, teens need between eight and 10 hours of sleep each night, but only 15 percent are even getting close to that amount. During the school week, most teens only get about six hours of zzz’s a night, and some of that sleep deficit may be attributed to homework.

When it comes to school, many adults would rather not trade places with a teen. Think about it. They get up at the crack of dawn and get on the bus when it’s pitch dark outside. They put in a full day sitting in hours of classes (sometimes four to seven different classes daily), only to get more work dumped on them to do at home. To top it off, many kids have after-school obligations, such as extracurricular activities including clubs and sports , and some have to work. After a long day, they finally get home to do even more work – schoolwork.

[Read: What Parents Should Know About Teen Depression .]

Homework is not only a source of stress for students, but it can also be a hassle for parents. If you are the parent of a kid who strives to be “perfect," then you know all too well how much time your child spends making sure every bit of homework is complete, even if it means pulling an all-nighter. On the flip side, if you’re the parent of a child who decided that school ends when the last bell rings, then you know how exhausting that homework tug-of-war can be. And heaven forbid if you’re that parent who is at their wit's end because your child excels on tests and quizzes but fails to turn in assignments. The woes of academics can go well beyond the confines of the school building and right into the home.

This is the time of year when many students and parents feel the burden of the academic load. Following spring break, many schools across the nation head into the final stretch of the year. As a result, some teachers increase the amount of homework they give. The assignments aren’t punishment, although to students and parents who are having to constantly stay on top of their kids' schoolwork, they can sure seem that way.

From a teacher’s perspective, the assignments are meant to help students better understand the course content and prepare for upcoming exams. Some schools have state-mandated end of grade or final tests. In those states these tests can account for 20 percent of a student’s final grade. So teachers want to make sure that they cover the entire curriculum before that exam. Aside from state-mandated tests, some high school students are enrolled in advanced placement or international baccalaureate college-level courses that have final tests given a month or more before the end of the term. In order to cover all of the content, teachers must maintain an accelerated pace. All of this means more out of class assignments.

Given the challenges kids face, there are a few questions parents and educators should consider:

Is homework necessary?

Many teens may give a quick "no" to this question, but the verdict is still out. Research supports both sides of the argument. Personally, I would say, yes, some homework is necessary, but it must be purposeful. If it’s busy work, then it’s a waste of time. Homework should be a supplemental teaching tool. Too often, some youth go home completely lost as they haven’t grasped concepts covered in class and they may become frustrated and overwhelmed.

For a parent who has been in this situation, you know how frustrating this can be, especially if it’s a subject that you haven’t encountered in a while. Homework can serve a purpose such as improving grades, increasing test scores and instilling a good work ethic. Purposeful homework can come in the form of individualizing assignments based on students’ needs or helping students practice newly acquired skills.

Homework should not be used to extend class time to cover more material. If your child is constantly coming home having to learn the material before doing the assignments, then it’s time to contact the teacher and set up a conference. Listen when kids express their concerns (like if they say they're expected to know concepts not taught in class) as they will provide clues about what’s happening or not happening in the classroom. Plus, getting to the root of the problem can help with keeping the peace at home too, as an irritable and grumpy teen can disrupt harmonious family dynamics .

[Read: What Makes Teens 'Most Likely to Succeed?' ]

How much is too much?

According to the National PTA and the National Education Association, students should only be doing about 10 minutes of homework per night per grade level. But teens are doing a lot more than that, according to a poll of high school students by the organization Statistic Brain . In that poll teens reported spending, on average, more than three hours on homework each school night, with 11th graders spending more time on homework than any other grade level. By contrast, some polls have shown that U.S. high school students report doing about seven hours of homework per week.

Much of a student's workload boils down to the courses they take (such as advanced or college prep classes), the teaching philosophy of educators and the student’s commitment to doing the work. Regardless, research has shown that doing more than two hours of homework per night does not benefit high school students. Having lots of homework to do every day makes it difficult for teens to have any downtime , let alone family time .

How do we respond to students' needs?

As an educator and parent, I can honestly say that oftentimes there is a mismatch in what teachers perceive as only taking 15 minutes and what really takes 45 minutes to complete. If you too find this to be the case, then reach out to your child's teacher and find out why the assignments are taking longer than anticipated for your child to complete.

Also, ask the teacher about whether faculty communicate regularly with one another about large upcoming assignments. Whether it’s setting up a shared school-wide assignment calendar or collaborating across curriculums during faculty meetings, educators need to discuss upcoming tests and projects, so students don’t end up with lots of assignments all competing for their attention and time at once. Inevitably, a student is going to get slammed occasionally, but if they have good rapport with their teachers, they will feel comfortable enough to reach out and see if alternative options are available. And as a parent, you can encourage your kid to have that dialogue with the teacher.

Often teens would rather blend into the class than stand out. That’s unfortunate because research has shown time and time again that positive teacher-student relationships are strong predictors of student engagement and achievement. By and large, most teachers appreciate students advocating for themselves and will go the extra mile to help them out.

Can there be a balance between home and school?

Students can strike a balance between school and home, but parents will have to help them find it. They need your guidance to learn how to better manage their time, get organized and prioritize tasks, which are all important life skills. Equally important is developing good study habits. Some students may need tutoring or coaching to help them learn new material or how to take notes and study. Also, don’t forget the importance of parent-teacher communication. Most educators want nothing more than for their students to succeed in their courses.

Learning should be fun, not mundane and cumbersome. Homework should only be given if its purposeful and in moderation. Equally important to homework is engaging in activities, socializing with friends and spending time with the family.

[See: 10 Concerns Parents Have About Their Kids' Health .]

Most adults don’t work a full-time job and then go home and do three more hours of work, and neither should your child. It's not easy learning to balance everything, especially if you're a teen. If your child is spending several hours on homework each night, don't hesitate to reach out to teachers and, if need be, school officials. Collectively, we can all work together to help our children de-stress and find the right balance between school and home.

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Your child will be required to complete a wide variety of homework assignments and exercises in 8th grade, and many of them will be for math and English. Keep reading for helpful hints on how to create assignments and exercises for your child at home.

Homework for 8th Graders

What your child can expect.

Whether you're helping your child with her homework or creating assignments for her to complete, you should start by getting a sense of what she's learning and how it fits into the overall curriculum. Many schools base their 8th grade learning objectives on the Common Core State Standards, which you can access online. You can also find information about your state's 8th grade curriculum on its department of education website.

Math Homework

In 8th grade math, it's likely that most of your child's homework will be in algebra, geometry, the number system, probability and statistics. You can create extra practice assignments for your child by compiling problems from his textbook, quizzes, tests and past homework assignments, or you can ask his teacher for extra worksheets.

English Homework

By the 8th grade, your child will probably be expected to read and analyze plays, novels, poetry, short stories and informative articles. You can ask your child's teacher for extra assignments, or you can create your own by selecting articles from newspapers and magazines and writing questions about them. You can even ask your child to compare and contrast different authors' viewpoints.

You can also read a book, play or poem that your child has been assigned at school and discuss it with her. For example, if she's been assigned a novel to read, you can ask her opinion about its theme and the characters' motivations. You can also encourage her to learn more about the author and the time period in which the book was written.

Online Assignments and Exercises

If creating extra assignments for your child is too time consuming, consider finding some online. Whether you're looking for worksheets, practice tests, games, activities or study guides, you can find free or low-cost resources on the Internet. For example, you can download math practice problems or find short stories to read and discuss with your child. Fact Monster's Homework Center is a useful site that offers a vast amount of information and assignments covering math, science, English/language arts, social studies and more.

Other Articles You May Be Interested In

Educators agree that there is more to life than school and homework. So, how much homework is reasonable?

How useful is homework? Read on to learn about the different types of homework and how it can be applied most successfully to a student's education.

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# hours for your school day - 7th/8th grades???

By ncmom2dawters , July 16, 2013 in Logic Stage & Middle Grade Challenges

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Ncmom2dawters.

On average, how many hours a day does your 7th/8th grader spend working on school assignments (with you and doing independent work)? 

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8filltheheart

on avg 8 hrs

Yep, I agree 8 hrs.

Coffeemama

I'm planning on 6 hours for: science, history, literature, writing, math (1 hour each) plus vocabulary, piano, and Spanish (at 20 mins each). she'll be doing logic and a few other electives once a week at co-op which I didn't count.

**8 hour comments give me the feeling that I'm missing something important. If I am, please let me know! I'm aware that that grammar isn't listed; we are taking a break, since my DD seems to have better grammar than most educated adults ( including me). She also asked to stop Latin.

My kids are doing---

Science, history, lit each 1 hr

Latin and French each around 45 mins

Math for about 1 1/2 hrs

Writing about 45 mins

Religion, spelling, vocab, and grammar each about 15 mins

And the last hr is real life bc nothing ever fits neatly into tightly timed boxes.....so the above are approximates. Some days may be longer, some shorter, but realistically my 8th graders rarely finish under 7 1/2 hrs and I would guess that 8 is more real.

Five hours in 8th grade.

6 hours in 9th. This has been sufficient for rigorous work in the five core subjects plus some extra time for electives.

(I orient myself on the fact that my home country, students in a college prep high school would have about 34 periods a 45 minutes per week, resulting in a strong, well balanced education. Homeschooling is more effective.)

5LittleMonkeys

5LittleMonkeys

My 7th finished in about 6 last year but it will be about 7 this year for 8th. This is just for T - F. Mondays are co-op days so she only gets about 3 hours of work done that day.

Am. History

Health and Nutrition

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3rd season of AG then Killgallon

Everything isn't done daily.

Melissa B

We average 8 hours.  Dd has seven credits at approximately 1 hour each.  However, history and math generally take longer.

Thanks for the replies!!!  I was talking to a friend whose 7th grader averages 2-3 hours a day...some days 1-2 hours.  I've heard others say school only takes a few hours a day for their middle school age students.  My 7th/8th graders average 5-8 hours with most days being 6-7.  We do have one day a week that is only 3-3.5 because of extracurricular activities.  I was beginning to wonder if I was expecting to much while also feeling there are a few more things I would like to fit in.

For 7th/8th grades, covering about 5-6 subjects, our very average, non-rigorous DSs here could only handle 5-6 hours a day for Mon-Thurs, and only about 2 hours on Fridays to allow for involvement with homeschool group youth. A little bit of reading was done 1-2 evenings a week. PE type of activities were done in the late afternoons (i.e., after school), weekends, and summers.

It was very important to me to have a balanced schedule -- academics as best we can do them, yes, but also with time to explore with extracurriculars, AND "down time" for DSs to fiddle about with interests, hobbies, projects, etc. So, an average of 20-24 hours of academics per week was what we could do well and still have a balanced lifestyle. If you have more motivated DC, you can definitely increase the hours per week.

LOL -- Guess we were slackers. ;) :D

Certainly one has to keep in mind that some students do work faster.  One of my children is an *avid* reader and can zip through assignments where as the other is a slower reader.

Laura Corin

Laura Corin

Calvin did 9-5, with a half hour break mid-morning and an hour for lunch.  This didn't include exercise or free reading, but did include music practice.

~Anna~

For 7th (our first year) we did about 4 hours, sometimes 5. That is about all my DD can stay focused for, so that's what we did. We will do the same for 8th. We are doing year round though, so I figure we can have lighter days because of that.

Thanks for the replies!!! I was talking to a friend whose 7th grader averages 2-3 hours a day...some days 1-2 hours. I've heard others say school only takes a few hours a day for their middle school age students. My 7th/8th graders average 5-8 hours with most days being 6-7. We do have one day a week that is only 3-3.5 because of extracurricular activities. I was beginning to wonder if I was expecting to much while also feeling there are a few more things I would like to fit in.

For others (who complain when we can't go to the museum/park/beach AGAIN) they literally are done with school by 10am...I don't understand it...

For seventh grade (last year):

maths-----1.5 hr (on average)

English/language arts------1 hr

history------1 hr

world geography (her elective of choice)------1 hr

science-------1 hr

so 5.5 hours each day.

I did not count the time she spent on academic[\i] extracurricular activities. Science Olympiad consumed an average of 5 hours each week from September-March. She spent 2 hr/week at home on robotics from August-January (FLL season) plus the twice-weekly team meetings.

Eighth grade looks like:

maths-----1.5 hr

English/language arts-----1 hr

American history-----1 hr

physics----1.5 hr (average---2 days will be longer w labs)

electronics/programming----.5-1 hr (one-semester electives)

so 5.5-6 hours each day on average.

I may count Science Olympiad as a second science elective, depending on her events and how much time/studying they require.

This makes me feel better! I was feeling like our day was dragging last year when my 7th grader worked from 9 - 4ish with a 45min break for lunch and often had corrections, reading, piano, dance etc in the afternoons. Looks like our 6-7 hour day is right on target. I'd always heard to guesstimate around an hour per grade level - it has worked like that here, with the exception of my 3rd grader last year who could zip through his work in 2 hours or draw it out for 5 - depending on his mood. ;) LOL

I just felt I should come back and clarify.

My dd "could" get done with the work "I" require in about 5 or so hours a day, so, in about 22-25 hours a week.  Her art, Japanese, and Korean are "her" requirements and are her passions\interests and what bump her time up to a little over 30 hours a week. 

foxbridgeacademy

foxbridgeacademy

I just finished a tentative schedule that includes:(Mon-Thurs.) Math (1hr), Language Arts (1 1/2 -2 hours), Science(1/2hr), and Spanish (1/2hr. Plus History 3 times a week for about 1/2 hr. So somewhere between 4-5 hours per day max. It could be much less if he's quick about it. I don't believe in busy work and he is Dyslexic (maybe dysgraphia too) so I do a lot of the reading to him and do some of the handwriting for him.... most work is oral though. Fridays are for review/quiz and discussion.

happymomofboys

happymomofboys

I've heard this from quite a few friends as well. One thing (in their defense?) is that some of their children take multiple outsourced classes which I don't think they count when describing a typical day. For others (who complain when we can't go to the museum/park/beach AGAIN) they literally are done with school by 10am...I don't understand it...

I would want to ask them what their curriculum looks like.  When I was in middle school we used textbooks for every class.  If I had been allowed to skip the lecture (which was nearly always simply a repeat of what was stated in the text) and learn it on my own, I could have easily finished all of the reading and questions in a couple of hours a day.  That was one of the reasons I chose to homeschool in the first place.  School for me was a massive waste of perfectly good time I could have been spending in the library.  Now that I'm homeschooling, I look at all the reading my kids are doing and realize that yes, our school day looks full, but half of it is spent in our "library."

Mandy in TN

It has been awhile since I had 7th and 8th graders, but I wanted to point out that several of you who say that school takes 7 or more hours also say that you have one light day each week. So, 4 days are longer in order for the 5th to be shorter. So, it would be more accurate to say how many hours/ wk your child spends on school.

Also, we would need to define what counts as school. Some people include the time a child spends reading literature for LA in the hours spent on school that day and some do not. Some people include music practice, 4H, and sports in their hour count and some do not. Some people even count hours on chores as life skills. (if you have chickens, sheep, and horses, this can be time consuming. Don't get me started on dairy cows.) Some people count field trips to an art museum but not field trips to pick strawberries. Some people count them all and some people count none.

Additionally, we would need to figure the number of days each year that are school days. A family that schools on a traditional school calendar and takes summers off will need to spend more time each day than a family who schools year round.

When families tell me the length of their school day, I try to take it with a grain of salt and move on unless they are concerned and asking for help. There are just too many factors that go into how long a school day lasts. :)

It has been awhile since I had 7th and 8th graders, but I wanted to point out that several of you who say that school takes 7 or more hours also say that you have one light day each week. So, 4 days are longer in order for the 5th to be shorter. So, it would be more accurate to say how many hours/ wk your child spends on school.   Also, we would need to define what counts as school. Some people include the time a child spends reading literature for LA in the hours spent on school that day and some do not. Some people include music practice, 4H, and sports in their hour count and some do not. Some people even count hours on chores as life skills. (if you have chickens, sheep, and horses, this can be time consuming. Don't get me started on dairy cows.) Some people count field trips to an art museum but not field trips to pick strawberries. Some people count them all and some people count none.   Additionally, we would need to figure the number of days each year that are school days. A family that schools on a traditional school calendar and takes summers off will need to spend more time each day than a family who schools year round.   When families tell me the length of their school day, I try to take it with a grain of salt and move on unless they are concerned and asking for help. There are just too many factors that go into how long a school day lasts. :) Mandy

I agree.    I was also confused b/c it looks like one poster has an 11 yo and in our homeschool, an 11 yr old would not be in 7th or 8th grade.   My kids are also studying foreign language in middle school which adds more time to their days. 

FWIW, our academic calendar is 175 full school days.   So when I post that my 8th graders avg around 8 hrs per day that would be x 175.   Another fwiw, I don't personally believe that an avg of 7-8 hrs is too long for a 13 yr old.  My 7th graders are avging 6-8 hrs with 7 being closer to the avg.    But by 9th-12th grade, days can be anywhere from 7-10 hrs.  (my rising 9th grader wants to study 4 foreign languages this yr, so that is going to consume a lot of her day.)

Mommy2BeautifulGirls

This is my rising 5th grader. She can do two lessons of grammar in about 10-15 minutes, math takes her about an hour now that she is doing more multiplication and division, and she spends about an hour each day on either history or science. Writing is done WTM-style through her history summaries, and then science summaries when we get started with her ES Biology in a few weeks. She reads a LOT on her own, so doing formal literature with her is hit and miss. When I have her doing literature as an assignment, it only takes her about a half hour to read and do the required activities that go with it. We will be adding in logic and probably continuing Latin at home since no one signed up for the co-op class for level 2. But even then, it looks like she should probably be done in about 3-1/2 to 4 hours. It seems light for 5th grade to me, but she gets it done and is progressing, so I just go with the flow. :D

This is an area where writing your own plans makes a huge difference.   My kids' plans are written directly toward their abilities, so no one is zipping or slogging.   The subjects will take about the same amt of time regardless of the student doing them b/c I know what they are capable of achieving and the assignments reflect that.     It all balances out.   If I have student that is capable of doing more in less time, I'll add in more (foreign language, or philosophy, or some other subject that a slower student wouldn't have added at the same age.   Or I'll expect more from their writing assignments, etc.)

I'm wondering when your middle and high schoolers see their friends - in the evenings or weekends? Or do you try to start earlier so you can be done earlier in the afternoon, or stop and then have homework after? If like us you prioritize academics, how do you decide how much time for friends etc.? This is sort of off topic but I'd really Like to hear from those of you who do 7-8 hours of school a day how that works out.

BakersDozen

"I'm wondering when your middle and high schoolers see their friends - in the evenings or weekends? Or do you try to start earlier so you can be done earlier in the afternoon, or stop and then have homework after? If like us you prioritize academics, how do you decide how much time for friends etc.? This is sort of off topic but I'd really Like to hear from those of you who do 7-8 hours of school a day how that works out."

My dc see their friends on Wednesday evenings when they go to Bible Quiz. They might see them on a weekend but that is rare. We're not anti-social and I don't purposefully limit time with friends, however since we started schooling our time has been prioritized as family first, school second, friends third. Thankfully, none of their friends live closer than a 30+ minute drive away so frequent get-togethers are not possible at all ("thankfully" meaning our/their time isn't stretched even thinner, not that I don't enjoy their friends).

By middle school my dc are doing school from 8-3:30 with some breaks, so about 6-6.5 hours/day. We school from beginning of August through the end of May (although summer is also used if things don't get done during the regular year). We stop at 3:30 so the dc can have free time then homework is done after dinner.

Fwiw, my kids' planners are written to tHem so they know exactly what is expected from them. So, if they know they want to do something on a certain day, they have the ability to work ahead in assignments in order to have a more flexible schedule.

I am actually perplexed that so many think that 7-8 hrs is unreasonable for an 8th grader. For a young child......absolutely agree. But, not at 13-14.
Just to clarify, I don't at all think that amount of time is unreasonable. As my oldest heads into these years, I am just trying to figure out how it will work, with so many homeschoolers prioritizing social time and hours everyday seeing friends or going out. I just needed to hear that it is okay not to spend three hours every day with a different friend.

I'm coming to realize that we are at a point where we need to shift the schedule priority from social activities to academic ones (past that point, probably). With an only who loves interaction, I realize I've had a tendency to fit school around social things, which worked fine in elementary, but not so well as we get up in grades. Looking at this year's schedule, I've already warned our homeschool group that we won't be doing as many of the general field trips as we used to do. I have to fit them in around too many outside and online classes plus time for the work I assign. Since the group is fairly small and we've been members for 8 years, it's been natural to want to support all the activities, but times change and priorities have to change with them if we are going to have the kind of educational environment we want.

As I said earlier, it has been awhile, but 8's post rang a bell. My big boys always had weekly schedules that were written to them and I do remember them working ahead in the evenings or getting up early in the mornings (with my boys usually evening :) ) in order to have the time available for social things.

They mostly took summers off and they had a 36 wk schedule that needed to be completed. :) As they moved into high school, they did more in the summers. Both my big boys took at least one dual enrollment class during the summer at some point in high school. My middle ds ran through Abeka's high school economics with a few other high schoolers one summer. They got together at a friend's house and knocked it out. That mother offered to proctor and grade all the tests. It was school work and social. The family had a pool, so when they finished they could go swimming.

Finishing some things in the summer gave my oldest time for rabbit trails and time to wallow in fantasy literature and still finish 2 years of high school Latin and 2 years of high school Spanish without his days ever being terribly long. It allowed my middle son to take high art at a tutorial, 2 years of art history at home, and 2 semesters of humanities through dual enrollment just because he wanted to do so.

As a side note, my middle ds finished his freshman year as a computer science major. He chose to stay at college this summer and complete a couple of general studies requirements, because he doesn't want to take more than 16 credit hrs in a semester. He entered college with over 20 credit hrs and wants to graduate in 4 years. One general studies requirement at his college is that he needed to take either a Women's studies, Appalachain studies, or African American studies course. This summer one of the courses he took was quilting. lol It counted as both Women's and Appalachain studies and he took it with a girl he likes. He made a little quilt that he gave to my mom. He would never have had the time to put into that course with a full load of computer science courses, but he had fun doing it this summer. So, you can shorten your school days a little if you view schooling more like an adult views a job instead of viewing it as something you do for 9 months followed by a 3 month vacation.

My little guy has never had summers off, but we do things a little lighter in the summer. Following in his big boys footsteps, summers have been a short summer session rather than a continuation of the school year. This was the second summer that I used MBtP to drive his studies. It is different than how I approach the rest of the school year and gives us a chance to look at education from a different perspective. This summer we also have covered the astronomy chapters of his physical science text for next year, so science can be a little shorter during the school year. :)

momto2Cs

I'll just go ahead and say that frankly, I don't get a 7-8 hour schoolday for a homeschooler. Please understand, I am not trying to be snarky or anything like that, I just don't get it. That it is longer than the average high school day around here does make me wonder.

I am aiming for about 4-5 hours a day with a 7th grader.

I'll just go ahead and say that frankly, I don't get a 7-8 hour schoolday for a homeschooler. Please understand, I am not trying to be snarky or anything like that, I just don't get it. That it is longer than the average high school day around here does make me wonder.   I am aiming for about 4-5 hours a day with a 7th grader.

Are you counting homework for the high school students?  My son is in 6th and we're still tweaking his schedule to get him down to 7 hours of school a day, but that's not 7 hours of instruction or even time on task.  It's 7 hours to get him to sit down, pay attention, and get his assignments completed.  He only has about 4 hours of instruction per day.  The rest of the day is spent reading or working on what would be homework if he were in public school.  Some kids are just slower at finishing their work than others.  Certainly there are kids in public school who waste time shuffling papers, pretending to read, and staring at their homework because they'd just rather not do it?

For 7th/8th grades, covering about 5-6 subjects, our very average, non-rigorous DSs here could only handle 5-6 hours a day for Mon-Thurs, and only about 2 hours on Fridays to allow for involvement with homeschool group youth. A little bit of reading was done 1-2 evenings a week. PE type of activities were done in the late afternoons (i.e., after school), weekends, and summers.   It was very important to me to have a balanced schedule -- academics as best we can do them, yes, but also with time to explore with extracurriculars, AND "down time" for DSs to fiddle about with interests, hobbies, projects, etc. So, an average of 20-24 hours of academics per week was what we could do well and still have a balanced lifestyle. If you have more motivated DC, you can definitely increase the hours per week.   LOL -- Guess we were slackers. ;) :D

We're more like this. Eight hours is longer than a school day, including lunch, recess and changing classes!

Guest Havecutekids

Guest Havecutekids

Mine did about 3 hours in 7th.

I'm glad to see others chiming in with lower numbers.  Last year for 6th, DS averaged 3-4 hours a day.  That was with a very complete and rigorous schedule.  He is able to stay on task and complete things in a timely manner.  I would never dream of adding to his schedule just to make it all even out to 8 hours.  In my mind the beauty of homeschooling is that it doesn't take nearly as long as public school.  They waste more time on changing classes, getting everyone under control and busy work and then send them home with a few hours of homework.  If my kids can finish in less time, then better for all of us.  It doesn't mean we're doing any less than those who take 8 hours.  But my goodness, bless you all that have to deal with keeping kids on task for that long.

N rising 6th grader  GWG6, WWW 6, SOTW3 with his sister plus extra reading, NOEO chemistry 2 with his sister, Singapore 6a, 6b , piano and clarinet lessons

Complete and rigorous mean different things to different people. Looking at your signature your son didn't do logic or foreign language. I see no vocabulary program or formal literature program. The science and social studies are both at the very low end of what is accepted as 6th grade. GWG6 and WWW are listed as 6th grade, but they are gentle and not as time consuming as many other 6th grade grammar and composition programs.

To clarify- I am not advocating longer days or more rigorous curriculum. Every child is different. There is no point in using curriculum that is above a child's ability level or adding more subjects that push the day longer than a child's attention span. If you do so, the child will zone out or burn out, and you will have wasted your time and his. However, if you look at what you are doing and what these other posters say they are doing, then you are indeed doing less and also using less rigorous materials than those whose days are longer.

If your ds used more than what is in your signature, please disregard this post.

Alte Veste Academy

Alte Veste Academy

Well, we're not there yet, but it's easy for me to imagine it for us. DS10 did about 4.5 per day in 4th grade last year and will do about 5.5 per day next year for 5th, not including literature reading. By 7th and 8th, when the work gears up, 7-8 hours doesn't seem like too much of a stretch. Sure, it's not what everyone envisions for their homeschool, and that's fine. But when I was in middle and high school, I took every honors and AP class available to me, and most of those were pretty rich. They also had some serious requirements for reading and output and, more relevant to this conversation, just loads and loads of homework. I was in school for 7-8 hours a day, and it wouldn't be unusual for me to then have 2-3 hours of homework. That could sometimes be more like 3-4 hours in high school, taking multiple simultaneous APs. What does that make? A 9-10, sometimes 11 or 12 hour day? So a 7-8 hour day? Sounds pretty mild by comparison. :lol:

What busywork there was in my middle/high school days will be weeded out, sure. But while I choose to homeschool K through about early middle so my kids can have shorter days and I can honor their childhoods, I am choosing to homeschool middle-high so that their just-as-long days will be richer and their time will be more efficiently used. If my kids can complete a 7-8 hour homeschool day in the later middle years without homework, leaving evenings free for personal pursuits, I will consider it a smashing success! In fact, we would still effectively be getting more done in less time, all factors considered.

I am a huge voice for not pushing our children beyond their abilities and not overloading kids w/work and giving them lots of free time for exploring, playing, self-entertainment. For those that have been on the forum for a while......it is completely ironic for me to be arguing for a larger academic load! ;) (ETA: most high schools in the states we have lived in have a minimum college bound diploma requirement of 24 credit hrs. That means at minimum 6 credits/yr. Advanced diploma students often have 28 credit hrs which means at least 7 credits/yr. That equates to at least that number of in classroom hrs w/o outside homework.)

But, there is also no way I could justify a solid academic program for a 6th grader that was completed in 3-4 hrs/day. I also do not have to deal with keeping my kids on task for their school days. They grow into their days and their workloads at a completely natural pace. They have a huge amt of input into what is studied. They often ask for more than I willing to allow them to take. (I have had to tell my ds that, no, he may not add in another math class or tell my dd, no, she may not add yet another foreign lang!)

A good avg minimum academic load for an avg 6th grader would be an hr each of math, science, history, lit, plus writing, grammar, spelling, and vocabulary. That is at least a 5 hr day even if they only write for 30 mins and spend 10 mins on grammar, spelling, and vocab. And those are skeleton basics.

The only exception we had in terms of workload friction is when our oldest ds was in high school. During his 11th and 12th grade yrs, we did have huge amts of conflict caused by homeschooling friends and their parents that constantly told our ds that what I expected was unreasonable and that I did not know what was really expected from a high school level student. There was a group of them that all hung out together every Friday afternoon and he could't b/c had a full school day of work to do. Those families avg-ed 4 hrs per day. I based my expectations for him on helping him prepare for his goals (most definitely not mine. He was absolutely positive about what he wanted to pursue.) He wanted to be a chemical engineer. Dh is a chemE and we were married in college, so I knew what ds was going to need in order to make it through to college graduation. So, we simply explained to ds that what he was doing academically was ultimately going to benefit him his entire life b/c he would be well prepared for the classes he was going to have take. That learning how to manage a full workload and complete difficult assignments was what he was going to have be able to do.

One day during the first semester of ds's freshman yr I received a phone call. It was very brief. He simply said, "mom, I have something I want to tell you. Thank you." I knew exactly what he meant. His friends were flunking class after class. 2 never graduated. 1 did graduate after 5 yrs with a completely different major (he started off in engineering w/ds) but he still does not have a job. Ds graduated cum laude in 4 yrs (which included 12 months of co-oping), and with 4 competitive job offers to choose from. He has a wonderful job that he loves with great job security. Not all recent college grads can say the same thing. I have zero regrets about how he was educated throughout his homeschool yrs.

I also do not see a 6-8 hr day in middle school or 7-10 hr days in high school interfering w/any of my kids' abilities to pursue outside interests. They don't have "homework." That 6-8 hrs or 7-10 hrs is their work day. So they have all late afternoon/evening until bedtime to pursue their interests. They don't do school work on weekends. They have 1 week off every 5-7 weeks + 11 weeks off during the summer. That is way more free time than I ever had going to school. I spent an hr on the bus each direction plus had homework at night and on weekends. I was fortunate in that I did receive a great education. I hated the amt of academic work I did in high school, but in hindsight, I wish I could thank my high school teachers. They were dedicated and expected us to work as hard as they did. I expect no more/no less from my own children.

We will be schooling from 8AM to 3PM. I think last year when my oldest was in 7th grade she was doing about 5 hours a day but our days varied.

N rising 6th grader  GWG6, WWW 6, SOTW3 with his sister plus extra reading, NOEO chemistry 2 with his sister, Singapore 6a, 6b , piano and clarinet lessons   Complete and rigorous mean different things to different people. Looking at your signature your son didn't do logic or foreign language. I see no vocabulary program or formal literature program. The science and social studies are both at the very low end of what is accepted as 6th grade. GWG6 and WWW are listed as 6th grade, but they are gentle and not as time consuming as many other 6th grade grammar and composition programs.   To clarify- I am not advocating longer days or more rigorous curriculum. Every child is different. There is no point in using curriculum that is above a child's ability level or adding more subjects that push the day longer than a child's attention span. If you do so, the child will zone out or burn out, and you will have wasted your time and his. However, if you look at what you are doing and what these other posters say they are doing, then you are indeed doing less and also using less rigorous materials than those whose days are longer.   If your ds used more than what is in your signature, please disregard this post. Mandy

That was written a year and a half ago as a planning tool.  It's not even half of what we actually did.  I should probably erase it. 

That is way more free time than I ever had going to school.   I spent an hr on the bus each direction plus had homework at night and on weekends.   I was fortunate in that I did receive a great education.   I hated the amt of academic work I did in high school, but in hindsight, I wish I could thank my high school teachers.   They were dedicated and expected us to work as hard as they did.   I expect no more/no less from my own children.

I do not mean to argue at all, I just wanted to note that I find it very interesting how our expectations for our kids are influenced by our own school experiences.

I would also say I received a great education in public school in my home country: math through calculus, two foreign languages *to fluency*, strong sciences, (only history was a bit weak for political reasons); I ended up academically well prepared for a rigorous university education that expected more than we do here from our college freshmen at the university where I teach. But up to 10th grade, that was accomplished by roughly 32-34 periods a 45 minutes each week, so about 25 hours. (And that is *still* the amount of class time in college prep schools in my home country). Homework? I finished most of that during class; the rest got done in the streetcar on the way home. I remember completely free afternoons from 2pm until bedtime.

If I can manage to educate my kids even nearly as well as I was educated, I'll be very happy.

(Btw, my school hours included substantial time wasted on extensive paramilitary training and communist indoctrination)

double post

I do not mean to argue at all, I just wanted to note that I find it very interesting how our expectations for our kids are influenced by our own school experiences. I would also say I received a great education in public school in my home country: math through calculus, two foreign languages *to fluency*, strong sciences, (only history was a bit weak for political reasons); I ended up academically well prepared for a rigorous university education that expected more than we do here from our college freshmen at the university where I teach. But up to 10th grade, that was accomplished by roughly 32-34 periods a 45 minutes each week, so about 25 hours. (And that is *still* the amount of class time in college prep schools in my home country). Homework? I finished most of that during class; the rest got done in the streetcar on the way home. I remember completely free afternoons from 2pm until bedtime. If I can manage to educate my kids even nearly as well as I was educated, I'll be very happy.   (Btw, my school hours included substantial time wasted on extensive paramilitary training and communist indoctrination)
But over how many weeks or days?   From what I just googled, it sounds like the avg German school is in session 220 days.   Is that correct?   If it is, that is 45 more days of school than we do.

But, if you are discussing 25 hrs/week for only 175 days, then no, we couldn't accomplish what we do in that amt of time.

No, that's not correct. It is true that their summer break is shorter, but they have various short breaks throughout the school year.

In my state, they have school breaks: http://www.schulferien.org/Kalender_mit_Ferien/kalender_2013_ferien_Sachsen.html

2 weeks October

2 weeks Christmas

2 weeks February

1 week Easter (actually more like 10 days)

1 week in May (includes two holidays)

6 weeks summer break

=14 weeks breaks

leaves 38 weeks for school.

Makes about 190 days (minus a few odd holidays).

The Catholic states in the South have even more religious holidays which are public holidays and no school.

Interesting to see what others do...always wondered.  Last year, roughly 6th grade, and what we plan for 7th, DS does about 20 hours/week not including recreational sports and a service club; about half of his academic assignments require what seems like particularly mentally tiring work, esp. writing, logic, or math.  We take about two months off and for about two months when local schools are off we spend about three hours a week.  He also does some unassigned reading completely on his own which I could count but am not here since it's 100% optional (like I placed Philosophy for Kids on his desk and he got a kick out of it and read it bit by bit).  Most math and writing wouldn't get done if it weren't assigned.

7-8 hours in reasonable, IMO, for most 7th-8th graders. My 6th grader will be ramping up some next year. This year he spends about 8 hours, but that includes an hour of exercise, at least 30 minutes of reading, and an hour of independent interest-led studies (topics vary).

My 8th grader will have 30 hours a week, give or take.  That includes 3 hours of music co-op, plus 4 hours of music practice.  It also includes 3 hours of regular co-op where he'll have P.E., writing, and science labs.  That's about 6 hours of work spread over 5 days.  If we didn't do the co-ops, he would spend more time doing bookwork at home, so the hours per week wouldn't really change.

No, that's not correct. It is true that their summer break is shorter, but they have various short breaks throughout the school year. In my state, they have school breaks: http://www.schulferien.org/Kalender_mit_Ferien/kalender_2013_ferien_Sachsen.html 2 weeks October 2 weeks Christmas 2 weeks February 1 week Easter (actually more like 10 days) 1 week in May (includes two holidays) 6 weeks summer break =14 weeks breaks   leaves 38 weeks for school. Makes about 190 days (minus a few odd holidays). The Catholic states in the South have even more religious holidays which are public holidays and no school.

Eta: I was thinking about it and wanted to share this as well. 12th grade ds only needs 3 credits to meet any possible criteria for admissions into almost any selective good university. That said, he will be taking 8-9 credits this yr. why? Bc he wants to. :) He can't imagine a yr w/o math and physics and is thinking about adding in computer science as well.

I'm glad to see others chiming in with lower numbers. Last year for 6th, DS averaged 3-4 hours a day. That was with a very complete and rigorous schedule. He is able to stay on task and complete things in a timely manner. I would never dream of adding to his schedule just to make it all even out to 8 hours. In my mind the beauty of homeschooling is that it doesn't take nearly as long as public school. They waste more time on changing classes, getting everyone under control and busy work and then send them home with a few hours of homework. If my kids can finish in less time, then better for all of us. It doesn't mean we're doing any less than those who take 8 hours. But my goodness, bless you all that have to deal with keeping kids on task for that long.

I love the idea of shorter days, but, wow, I just can't imagine getting it all done in 3-4 hours past 3rd or 4th grade.

On the other hand, I can see where homeschoolers would expect the day to be shorter because so much of the public school day (at least when I was there) is just a big waste of time. Instructional time at school can be greatly streamlined at home. My niece was in 7th at PS last year and never had more than an hour of homework, either. Then again, she's in the honors English program, but it is a tremendous struggle for her to get through the two low level books she is assigned to read over the summer.

We do longer days. I wish they were shorter and it seems they should be, but I haven't figured out how to make that happen.

I agree that there is a lot of wasted time in PS/ However, here they school from 8:00 - 3:20 and then have on average about 2 -3 hours of homework. That is 9-10 hours a day. Of course not counting time wasted but most of them do not have the academic education some have listed above, in the same amount of time.

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Home Made Our Way

8th-Grade Homeschool Curriculum, Resources, and Scheduled Lesson Plans

Homeschooling · Simplify Your Life

Welcome to this year’s picks for our 8th-grade homeschool year. I’ve listed these resources by subject.

I have also provided our 8th-grade lesson plans in our resource library. If you’d like a free copy, just fill out the form at the end of this post.

8th grade homeschool resources, schedule, and lesson plans

Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links that I have provided for your convenience. Click here to read my full disclosure policy.

Our 8th-Grade Curriculum

Mathematics.

algebra textbook for 8th-grade

For 8th-grade math, we are sticking to our favorite curriculum, Math-U-See . This year the boys are taking Algebra which covers the following topics:

  • Absolute Value
  • Adding and Subtracting Polynomials
  • Cartesian Coordinates
  • Coin Problems
  • Consecutive Integers
  • Equation of a Line
  • Exponents and Square Roots
  • Factoring Polynomials
  • Fractional Exponents
  • Graphing a Line: Inequalities, Parallel, and Perpendicular Lines
  • Metric Conversions
  • Multiplying and Dividing Polynomials
  • Order of Operations
  • Slope-Intercept Formula
  • Solving for an Unknown
  • Solving Simultaneous Equations
  • Unit and Square Unit Multipliers

This year’s workbook is a little different than the ones from previous years in that it has 35 chapters instead of 30. However, there are only two practice sheets per chapter as opposed to 3 making up for these extra chapters.

In the post, How to Use Math-U-See in Your Homeschool , I wrote about how to schedule these worksheets and tests using the 30-chapter textbooks but you can still use the same strategy for this year’s curriculum.

Language Arts/Writing for 8th-grade

english writing and grammar book for 8th-grade

We prefer BJU Press’ English curriculum and so I have ordered the English 8 workbooks, the teacher’s edition, tests, and keys. This curriculum covers grammar/usage and has writing assignments for 8th-grade level students.

If I don’t like a particular writing assignment, I will either modify it or come up with another writing assignment related to other subjects like history, math, or science.

homeschool planner

U.S. History

A history of us by joy hakim.

history book for 8th-grade

For the past five years, we have covered world history for our history component which covered some parts of U.S. history. So, this year I want us to concentrate more on U.S. history.

I saw some reviews on this particular curriculum and many talked about it being boring. However, I find it to be thorough and honest .

Too often I read historical summaries of our country and have to remove the sugar-coating or expand on some snippets for my boys.

I have, so far, skimmed some of the chapters in this 11-book volume set and I like the extra facts she provides in the margins and what has to be thousands of pictures.

I believe there is at least one picture and/or map on every page. Tests are sold separately and cover unit topics.

pin image for 8th grade homeschool resources, schedule, and lesson plans post

Volumes 1-10 begin with America’s prehistory and end with the election of President Donald Trump. I was able to schedule volumes 1 – 5 this year and will cover 6-10 next year.

The 11th volume is a sourcebook that contains documents, court cases, presidential addresses, etc. that have shaped our country.

Elemental Science – Biology for the Logic Stage

science books

Homeschool science curriculums can be very expensive. This is why I was so excited when I found Elemental Science . Not only do they provide a very hands-on curriculum but their prices are reasonable.

For middle schoolers, they provide four different science “categories”: Biology, Earth Science & Astronomy, Chemistry, and Physics. I have started on Biology but hope to fit in Earth Science & Astronomy later in the year.

I do suggest checking out Amazon and/or the Christian Bookstore for some of their supplementary reading books at lower prices. For the “Biology for the Logic Stage” curriculum, the following are recommended:

  • The Kingfisher Science Encyclopedia
  • The Usborne Science Encyclopedia

One other thing I especially liked was that they also provide all the materials you need for your lab experiments .

Yes, I could have bought more than half the stuff that was in the box, but this meant having to buy more than what I needed and also more work looking for certain items.

Last year, I tried finding seeds for an experiment. Well, it was January and I couldn’t find a simple packet of seeds. Their box also comes with a preserved frog for dissection. Try finding that in Home Depot! This alone has Josh excited about science; Jack, not so much.

materials for lab experiments

I have gone through their student guide and teacher’s edition and love the layout of the lessons. They even provide two types of lesson plans, one for those who want to teach science 5 days a week and another set for 2 days a week.

We were able to finish Biology early so I added the edition below.

Elemental Science – Earth Science & Astronomy for the Logic Stage

We started this curriculum in March and managed to finish the first unit. We will continue with this curriculum in August.

Even though this series is for middle schoolers, I will continue it through their first couple of years of high school. Much of the material is review and so we are able to get through the units very quickly.

Periodic Table

books about the periodic table elements

We started our study of the elements last year and will continue it through our 8th-grade year. We cover one element a week which I schedule on Fridays. The books and resources we use for this study are:

  • The Intriguing Story of the Elements by Jack Challoner
  • The Periodic Table by Adrian Dingle
  • The Elements by Theodore Gray
  • Photographic Cards of the Elements by Theodore Gray
  • Productive Homeschooling’s Notebooking Pages to write up their summaries

spanish curriculum books

This year we are sticking to BJU Press’ Spanish 1 curriculum. We did very well with it. The boys are grasping the language more and more.

This curriculum has 12 chapters with 3 to 4 lessons in each. We did six chapters last year and will finish the other six this year.

I think going slow and doing all the exercises provided is what has helped the boys with their Spanish.

The only gripe I’ve had with this curriculum is that they do not provide lesson plans (although it states that they do) and this curriculum is very outdated especially when it comes to the cultural studies sections.

set of classical literature books

Last year, I supplied a list of books that I was expecting us to go through. However, some books were very long and so we only covered half of what I listed. So for 8th grade, I hope to finish that list with the following:

  • Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
  • Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  • Animal Farm by George Orwell

Shakespeare

  • The Tempest

The books you see pictured above are Easton Press books. They are a bit pricey so I have provided links to cheaper versions on Amazon to fit your budget. But don’t forget that you can also borrow them from your local public library.

Additional Resources

We use Homeschool in the Woods Record of Time for creating our timelines . We’ve had these timeline books for five years now and I can tell you that there is not one bit of wear or tear in these pages.

The figures you see below come from their Collection of Historical Timeline Figures CD .

timeline book

We use Post-It’s 3 x3 Full Adhesive Notes for entering our historical figures and events in our timelines. This way, if we have to remove a figure/event to make room for another, it won’t tear or destroy our pages like glue or tape can.

More Resources

Below are additional resources we use in our homeschool:

  • American Student Heritage Dictionary and Thesaurus
  • Algebra DVD from MathUSee-contains lessons by the author
  • Spanish DVD from BJU Press Spanish 1 Curriculum-contains activities for speaking Spanish
  • The University of Chicago Spanish-English Dictionary
  • America, the Story of Us DVD for U.S. History

Get Your Free 8th Grade Lesson Plans

Click here to get your free –> 8th-grade lesson plans for all the resources in this post.

additional resources for homeschool

Well, these are our homeschool picks for 8th grade. If you have any questions please feel free to leave a comment or email me at [email protected]

Need help with curriculum for other homeschool grades. Click on any of the posts below:

  • 5th-grade homeschool curriculum resources
  • 6th-grade homeschool curriculum resources
  • 7th-grade homeschool curriculum resources
  • 9th-grade homeschool curriculum resources

Bonus : Student planners are now available! Click here to check them out.

Need a homework station for your child? Click here to put one together and get your kid organized for school.

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IMAGES

  1. 8th Grade Homeschool Schedule

    8th grade hours of homework

  2. How Much Time Should Be Spent on Homework Based on Grade?

    8th grade hours of homework

  3. How Much Time Should Be Spent on Homework Based on Grade?

    8th grade hours of homework

  4. 8th Grade Math Homework

    8th grade hours of homework

  5. Homeschool Hours by Grade Chart

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  6. 8th Grade Homework

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COMMENTS

  1. What's the Right Amount of Homework?

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  2. Outlining Simple Homework Guidelines for K-8 Teachers

    1. Homework should be clearly defined. Homework is not unfinished classwork that the student is required to take home and complete. Homework is "extra practice" given to take home to reinforce concepts that they have been learning in class.

  3. How Much Time Should Be Spent on Homework Based on Grade?

    Usually, Grade 1 - 3 students receive one to three homework assignments per week. They suggest that your child spend at least 20 - 30 minutes per night on homework. Grade 4 - 5 students who receive two to four assignments per week, should focus between 40 - 50 minutes on completing each assignment.

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  6. How Much Time Should Be Spent on Homework?

    What is the recommended time in elementary school? In first through third grade, students should receive one to three assignments per week, taking them no more than fifteen to twenty minutes. In fourth through sixth grade, students should receive two to four assignments per week, lasting between fifteen and forty-five minutes.

  7. What Teachers Need to Know about Homework (by an 8th Grader)

    As an 8th grade student, I think it would be helpful for you to hear a kid's perspective and advice about homework. I know my teachers care about their students, but I am not sure they always understand the impact of assigning homework on students and what it is really like for kids my age when they get home from school.

  8. How To: Choose the Right Amount of Daily Homework

    The upper limit in grades 7-8 is 2 hours and the limit in high school should be 2.5 hours. Teachers can use the homework time recommendations included here as a point of comparison: in particular, schools should note that assigning homework that exceeds the upper limit of these time estimates is not likely to result in additional learning gains ...

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  11. 8th Grade Math

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  12. The homework debate: how much homework is enough?

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  13. 8th Grade Homeschool Schedule

    Here's our Basic 8th Grade Schedule: 8:30am - Breakfast 9:00am - Bible 9:15am - Math 9:30am - English 10:40am - Spelling 11:00am - Art/Drawing (Mon), Writing (T-TH) 12:00pm - Lunch 12:45pm - Typing 1:00pm - Literature 1:30pm - History 2:00pm - Science 2:45pm - Homework 4:30pm - Swimming Options:

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  15. 8th Grade Homework Assignments and Exercises

    English Homework. By the 8th grade, your child will probably be expected to read and analyze plays, novels, poetry, short stories and informative articles. You can ask your child's teacher for extra assignments, or you can create your own by selecting articles from newspapers and magazines and writing questions about them.

  16. Average hours spent on homework per week and percentage of 9th- through

    1 Refers to one or more parent or other household adult. NOTE: Data are based on the responses of the parent most knowledgeable about the student's education. Data exclude students who did not do homework outside of school; in 2007, parents reported that about 7 percent of 9th- through 12th-grade students did not do homework outside of school.

  17. Browse Printable 8th Grade Worksheets

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  19. Free Worksheets for Eighth Grade

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  20. # hours for your school day

    Five hours in 8th grade. 6 hours in 9th. This has been sufficient for rigorous work in the five core subjects plus some extra time for electives. (I orient myself on the fact that my home country, students in a college prep high school would have about 34 periods a 45 minutes per week, resulting in a strong, well balanced education.

  21. 8th-Grade Homeschool Curriculum

    So grab a cup of coffee, tea, or wine and have a look around. And don't forget to access the resource library full of free tools to help you out. Check out over 14 resources that should add to your 8th-grade homeschool curriculum. Includes resources for math, English, history, and even Spanish.

  22. 8th Grade Homework

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