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How to Use 6-Word Memoirs in the Classroom

Activities in which students have six words to collect their thoughts can help build community and get classroom discussions started.

Elementary student writing at her desk

I launched the Six-Word Memoir project in 2006 with a question on what was then a strange new platform called Twitter: “Can you describe your life in six words?” While I suspected that the constraint of six words would fuel creativity, it wasn’t until I was invited to my nephew’s third-grade classroom to talk about six-word storytelling that I got my first glimpse of the format’s powerful possibilities in school. That morning, a few dozen elementary students shared stories of identity (“Born to be a spy, unnoticeable”), self-worth (“I live bigger than your labels”), agency (“Brainy, talkative, will never be quiet”), and more.

Since then, Six-Word Memoirs has become a valuable tool in many teachers’ toolboxes because it takes away the pressure of a whole blank page while helping kids focus on what’s important in writing: honest and specific storytelling. And what’s important in any young life: an understanding that no one knows or can tell your story better than you.

The six-word form is simple and adaptable and provides a great entry point for almost any subject, grade level, and topic. Below, I share six steps that apply to any Six-Word Memoirs lesson, followed by three classroom lessons.

Teaching Six-Word Memoirs

1. Introduce the Six-Word Memoir concept as a way students can describe their life using just two rules: one, they must use six words exactly, and two, they should be words that the students believe to be true and are exclusively their own.

2. Pick a topic or prompt. “How would you describe your life in six words?” is a great first prompt for any grade level.

3. Show examples of Six-Word Memoirs so students can see a variety of ways to think about the topic.

4. Give them time—either 10–15 minutes in class or as a homework assignment—to write their six words, and have each student read theirs aloud. Remember to share your own.

5. Leave time for discussion, either in small groups or with the whole class. Ask:

  • How are your experiences and perspectives similar to or different from those of your classmates?
  • What are you noticing about your favorite Six-Word Memoirs? Are they funny, inspiring, surprising, or something else?
  • What common themes do you see in these memoirs?

6. If possible, display student work.

Six-Word Exercises

1. Playing the “how well do you know your classmates?” game: Two key values of Six-Word Memoirs are that anyone can do it and everyone plays by the same rules. Taylor Swift gets six words (“My diary is read by everyone”), Nora Z., an 11-year-old from Indiana, gets six words (“Mom just revoked my creative license”), and the creator of the Six-Word Memoir Project gets six words (“Big hair, big heart, big hurry”).

Have your students write their six words and then read a memoir aloud and ask the class to guess whose it is. It’s fun and a good way for the class to connect. When students hear, “Life is better with headphones on,” there are sure to be a lot of mental “likes” and classmates saying, “Yeah, me too.” Hearing, “Three schools, three years, what next?” is relatable for anyone who’s been the new kid.

2. Engaging more deeply with curriculum: Once the ice is broken, the six-word format offers a chance to go deeper. You may be looking for a reflection activity for the 100th day of school, an innovative way to explore Black History Month, or an entry point to the study of history, literature, or current events.

Almost every grade studies nonfiction, and if your students are learning about historical figures, you can invite them to write a Six-Word Memoir from a historical person’s point of view. Writing only six words helps students get to the essence of the figure they’re studying and helps them identify with someone who otherwise may seem larger than life. After reading The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls, for example, students at South Side High School in Fort Wayne, Indiana, put themselves in the shoes of the narrator, writing, “Rain fell hard; Momma never flinched,” “Dad, put down the bottle, please?” and more.

If your classroom explores current events—transitions in our global economy, emerging political movements, debates about climate or technological advancements—ask your students to write six-word predictions about where they see these trends heading. This exercise helps students get started thinking critically about the issue or trend, and can be used to generate conversation or catalyze independent reflection.

3. Introducing difficult conversations: Teachers know that students arrive at the classroom as members of a complicated, ever-changing world and that they need to process this world and their place in it. One way to make these conversations easier is by breaking down big ideas into small, digestible chunks.

Andrea Franks, a fourth-/fifth-grade teacher in New York City, asks her students to reflect on social justice using just six words. Students have written, “Freedom for all, freedom for everyone,” “Small acts can make big differences,” “Dark skin, light skin, all equal,” and “Ready or not, time for change.” Franks then asks her students to think about how these memoirs reflect what they’re learning about civil rights and which historical figures might approve of these messages: Ruby Bridges? Diane Nash? Martin Luther King Jr?  Students then engage in deeper conversations, connecting their own experiences to the experiences of those who fought for all marginalized people.

Many students have struggled during the pandemic, and many educators tell me they have utilized the six-word format to help their students process this shared experience. Hundreds of these were compiled in a book I edited, A Terrible, Horrible, No Good Year: Hundreds of Stories on the Pandemic by Students, Teachers, and Parents . Memoirs like “Graduated fourth grade from my bedroom” (Leo F., fourth grade), “Hey Siri, give me social interaction” (Nate M., sixth grade), and “For sale: prom dress, never worn” (Caroline R., 12th grade) helped students express their emotions and gave the adults in their lives a window into their interior world.

Exploring the Power of Language with Six-Word Memoirs

Exploring the Power of Language with Six-Word Memoirs

  • Resources & Preparation
  • Instructional Plan
  • Related Resources

What do the words we write really have to say about us? In this lesson, students examine the power of word choice as they write six-word memoirs of their lives. After manipulating the language of their memoir with an interactive tool, students reflect on synonymous words that they have explored and choose the best one to use to tell the story of their lives.

Featured Resources

From theory to practice.

In "Register and Charge: Using Synonym Maps to Explore Connotation," Darren Crovitz and Jessica A. Miller argue that students' typical understanding of the word synonym as meaning "'a word that means the same as another word'" is "at best an oversimplification and at worst a way to end thinking about what words actually signify" (49). They advocate for investigations into language and word groups to allow students to discover that "the subtlety of just how and to what extent [words are] similar makes all the difference when it comes to choosing the best word for a given purpose" (49). This lesson encourages students to explore the subtleties of shifting connotation and meaning affected by word choice.

Further Reading

Common Core Standards

This resource has been aligned to the Common Core State Standards for states in which they have been adopted. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, CCSS alignments are forthcoming.

State Standards

This lesson has been aligned to standards in the following states. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, standard alignments are not currently available for that state.

NCTE/IRA National Standards for the English Language Arts

  • 1. Students read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.
  • 2. Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.
  • 3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).
  • 4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.
  • 5. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.
  • 8. Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.
  • 9. Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles.
  • 11. Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.
  • 12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Materials and Technology

  • Word Matrix student interactive
  • Video: Six Word Memoirs by Teens
  • Video: Six-Word Memoirs, the book
  • Video: “Six Tips for Writing Six-Word Memoirs”
  • Computers with Internet access
  • Choosing the Best Word: Six-Word Memoirs

This site includes six-word memoirs written by a variety of authors on life stories.  Also included are videos about the memoirs and information about Six-Word Memoir books.

On this site, students can explore memoirs and join thousands of storytellers to have a chance to be in a future book of Six-Word Memoirs.

This wiki includes six-word memoir films created by students, for students.

Preparation

  • Locate one or more copies of the Six-Word Memoir books . Familiarize yourself with the content within the book(s). You may wish to choose a few memoirs to share with and/or point out to the students.
  • Six Word Memoirs by Teens
  • Six-Word Memoirs, the book
  • “Six Tips for Writing Six-Word Memoirs”
  • Test the Word Matrix student interactive. You will need computers with internet access for each student to use this interactive.  If computer accessibility is a problem, print out paper copies of the interactive and make enough copies for each student.
  • Photocopy the Choosing the Best Word: Six-Word Memoirs handout for students.
  • Familiarize yourself with the ideas of synonyms, connotation, register, and sound/rhythm. Additional teacher information on synonyms and language can be found in a variety of articles from English Journal , Vol. 97, No. 4, March 2008 , with the issue theme “Teaching Spelling and Vocabulary in High School.”

Student Objectives

Students will:

  • define synonym and consider the implications of multiple word meanings for authors attempting to choose the most effective word in a given situation.
  • investigate the similarities and differences within word groups on the basis of connotation and register.
  • create, reflect on, and revise a memoir, taking into account word choice and message.

Session One

  • Begin a class discussion with students about memoirs and their “life stories.”  What do students consider to be their “life story”? Would they need to write a novel to explain everything, or could they tell about one event that helped shape them as a person? Explain to students that they are going to be writing memoirs of their lives, but there’s a catch—they only have six words to portray themselves however they wish and to get a message across.
  • Introduce the idea of six-word memoirs by projecting  Six Word Memoirs by Teens or  Six-Word Memoirs, the book . You may also wish to have some Six-Word Memoir books available for students to peruse after the video to see more examples.
  • After reading/seeing some six-word memoirs, what surprises you about this form?
  • What’s the difference between a story and a memoir?  Why do we tell stories?  Who knows your story best?
  • How is it both possible and impossible to distill the essence of who you are into six words?  Which author do you think does the best job of it and why?
  • Again, explain the parameters of the assignment: students must write a personal memoir in only six words. To give students a bit more information about what’s required, show students the “Six Tips for Writing Six-Word Memoirs” video. Allow for students’ questions and then ask that students spend some time brainstorming and writing down different possibilities for their own six-word memoir. Eventually, ask students to choose one memoir that they deem their “favorite” and they would like to use for the remainder of this lesson.
  • Ask students to write down a definition of the word synonym and provide several examples.
  • Arrange students in small groups to share their definitions and examples. As they share, ask them to look for similarities and differences in their definitions and examples. Have groups share their findings with the entire class and create a class definition of the word synonym , to be written on the board or chart paper.
  • Facilitate a discussion on how a poet or author might choose the "best word" for their piece of writing when there may be several words in the English language that express the same, or nearly the same, idea or concept.
  • Connotation: the emotional or personal associations the word carries, beyond its literal definition.
  • Register: the level of formality or informality associated with the word.
  • Sound and rhythm: the way words sound and scan contribute to their appropriateness.
  • Remind students to keep the memoir that they chose to use for the remainder of this lesson. If they wish, they may continue brainstorming and working on their memoir outside of class, as long as they bring their chosen memoir to the next session.

Session Two

  • Note to the Instructor : Synonyms can be any part of speech (e.g. nouns , verbs , adjectives , adverbs or prepositions ), as long as both members of the pair are the same part of speech.
  • Give students a few minutes to make their list of synonymous words (they may use a thesaurus if necessary) and think about how they actually differ in regard to connotation and register. Ask students to share examples and explain the differences they see.
  • Inform students that they will be using an online tool to explore the ideas of synonyms, connotation, and register further by arranging words that have the same meaning as their focus word but vary according to connotation and/or register.
  • Direct students to the Word Matrix tool online and ask them to select the option to organize words by connotation and register. Students will need to create a new concept that includes their focus words and the synonymous words in their list. You may wish to model this process before having students work independently.
  • After creating their concepts, each student should arrange their words according to relative charge in connotation and formality of register. Point out that there are not right or wrong answers to this activity. More important than where the students end up putting words is the explanations they write about what the words mean and how they relate to each other. They should indicate their thinking by double-clicking each word and writing a brief justification for its placement.
  • Explain to students that they can access online resources and get more information about connotation and register by clicking on the orange question mark within the tool. They should use the back navigation within the tool (not the back arrow in the browser) to get back to their work within the matrix .
  • Have students print their completed matrices . Review them before the next session to gauge student understanding of connotation and register.
  • Ask students to rewrite their six-word memoir by substituting each synonym in the place of the focus word that they originally chose. Thus, they should have multiple examples of the same six-word memoir with a different synonym replacing the focus word in each example. Students should complete this activity before the next session.

Session Three

  • Ask students to take out their list of memoirs within which they substituted different synonyms for their focus word. Have them take a moment to review the different memoirs and how they changed the meaning of the memoir.
  • Have students take out their  Choosing the Best Word: Six-Word Memoirs handout, on which they originally wrote their focus word and their synonyms. Ask them to reflect on how their word choice affected the meaning of their different memoirs. They should write about their thoughts and the memoir they prefer (with reasoning) on the handout under the Reflection Question.
  • After all students have completed the handout, have students take turns sharing their experience. They should share their original memoir, what their synonyms were, and the final memoir they decided on (along with their reasoning). Allow for other students to ask questions about the students’ word choice if they so choose.
  • create a class book of memoirs;
  • produce a video of your students’ memoirs, much like the videos they watched at the beginning of the session; or
  • have students submit their own six-word memoir at www.SMITHteens.com .
  • Allow students time to study their classmates’ memoirs and ask questions to get to know each other better and build a stronger classroom community!
  • Make six-word memoirs a part of your classroom routine. Do warm-ups or exit slips that ask students to write six-word memoirs. You’ll be amazed at how much you’ll learn about students based on their memoirs!
  • Present other short form writing choices for students to experiment with such as Haiku . Have them follow the same steps of substituting different synonyms into their writing to focus on word choice.
  • Expand on the idea of a six-word memoir while still focusing on word choice and story elements. Have students increase the length of their memoir.
  • Connect six-word memoirs to a literature activity by having students write literary characters’ six-word memoirs.
  • Have students produce a video of their memoirs to post to You Tube or another video site.  Use the video as an electronic scrapbook of the students in each class.

Student Assessment / Reflections

  • Provide formative feedback through the completed matrices , synonym lists, and any other student work prior to the project.
  • Evaluate students’ understanding of the project and completion of all of the steps during and after their oral presentation of their findings.
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Explore the similarities and differences among words typically considered synonyms with this tool that allows middle- and secondary-level students organize groups of words by connotation on one axis and by register on another.

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6 Word Memoir: Teaching Ideas for ELA

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6 word memoir assignment high school

There seems to be some controversy about whether the six word memoir genre did or didn’t originate with Ernest Hemingway writing, “For sale, baby shoes, never worn.” But whether he did or he didn’t, there’s no question that it’s a unique creative genre worth exploring with students. There are so many ways to experiment with six word memoirs in class, so today I’m going to give you a whirlwind tour of ideas.

#1 Personal Memoirs

6 word memoir assignment high school

Six word memoirs can be a great way for students to experiment with writing without a lot of pressure. You can use them to get to know your students better at the beginning of the year, or to reflect on the school year at the end. Or you can use them during a narrative writing unit, first asking them to craft a narrative about a moment or event in their lives, then inviting them to transform it into a six word story. You can even use it in combination with multimedia, asking them to create a layered six word memoir, with a one-pager style reflection of who they are in the background, and then their six key words laid out boldly on top. You may be surprised by how much you learn about your students through identity memoir, moment memoirs, or layered memoirs like these.

#2 Character Memoirs

6 word memoir assignment high school

Another great option, once you’ve introduced the concept of a six word memoir, is to have students write them for characters. Start by guiding them to think about their chosen character. How would they describe that character? What story does the character tell about themselves? What secret stories do they feel the character keeps buried? How can they combine everything they know into one vivid line?

#3 Research Memoirs

6 word memoir assignment high school

If you’re trying to create some context for a book or a unit, and you’d like students to spend a day researching information on a person before reporting back to the class, a six word memoir can provide a great final product. Let students know how many sources you’d like them to dive into and give them some guiding questions for their research. Then have them take what they learned and put it into a six word memoir. Save some time at the end for each student to briefly report back, or do a gallery walk with the memoirs displayed with the research questions, side by side.

#4 Community Memoirs

6 word memoir assignment high school

Once your students have written their own six word memoirs and perhaps experimented with character or research memoirs as well, this project is a great way to connect your classroom to your community. Set up a table at lunch or in the library to invite faculty, staff, administrators, and students to contribute six word memoirs to a community wall reflecting the diverse beauty of experiences at your school. Or set up at a local farmer’s market, community event, or public library. Display student work as examples, and provide templates and colored markers or pencils for the guest writers.

OK, ready to get started? You can grab the beautiful templates shown in this post right here on Google Drive , or you can find my complete six word memoir unit on TPT right here. (If you’re a member of The Lighthouse , this unit will be part of your June materials!).

6 word memoir assignment high school

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I usually use 6-word memoirs during the first week of school, but I didn’t this year. And, I now know why. I love the blend of writing and art that our templates provide. I am officially 8 days into my 19th year in the classroom, and after using 6-word memoirs for several years in a row (always with great success), I felt “6-word weary.” Thanks so much for, Betsy, for continuing to push us forward, providing fresh takes and new twists on familiar ideas like this.

Cassie, I’m so glad you’re going to try this twist and that it’s providing a refresh for an old trick. Thank you for your kind words!

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Building Community with Six Word Memoir

How to Teach Writing and Build Community with Six-Word Memoir

Icebreakers and community building activities can be fun… so fun, in fact, that it can be easy to get carried away. If you’re like me, there’s been more than a few years you’ve made it to week 3 only to realize your way behind on your pacing guide. 

One of my favorite ways to build community without getting behind in content is to teach the Six-Word Memoir. 

What is the Six-Word Memoir? 

Simply put, Six-Word Memoir is telling your life story (or more realistically, part of it) in just six words. 

According to Larry Smith, the founder of the Six-Word Memoir project , the idea was inspired by an old legend about Earnest Hemingway: According to legend, Hemingway was challenged to write a complete story in just six words. He wrote “For sale. Baby shoes. Never worn” and won the bet. 

In 2006, writer Larry Smith posted a challenge on his website and with a simple tweet: “Can you describe your life in six words?” Thousands responded and the Six-Word Memoir project was born. Since then, millions of people have shared their story in six words and Larry has published ten books of Six Word Memoirs, including Six Words Fresh off the Boat (immigration stories),   I Can’t Keep My Own Secrets (teen stories) , and A Terrible Horrible, No Good Year: Stories of the Pandemic by Teachers, Students, and Parents.

For teachers, the Six-Word Memoir has become a favorite back-to-school activity, allowing classes to build community, teachers to dive into content sooner, students to express themselves and get to know each other better, and parents to see a really cool sample of student work on Back to School Night.  

Why Six Word Memoir is Helpful for Teachers

Community building.

Unlike typical icebreakers like name games and speed dating (which, by the way, I absolutely love), the Six-Word Memoir is a getting-to-know-you activity that invites community building and sharing on a much deeper level with out forcing students to get too personal, since students choose the story they want to tell. 

Teaching Content

Nearly every grade-level has a Common Core State Standard asking students to analyze an author’s word choice and structure, making Six-Word Memoirs a perfect way to introduce diction and syntax. 

I love to talk about the author’s choice of that word versus all the others he or she could have used. We also discuss how authors structure sentences in order to fit into the constraints of having just six words. For example, what kind of message is communicated when the subject is moved to the end of the sentence? Or in some cases, left entirely out of the sentence?  

Strengthening Analysis Skills

Throughout the activity, you’ll be showing and discussing examples of other Six-Word Memoirs, inviting the opportunity to set norms and practice appropriate discussion etiquette. 

Students can identify larger themes behind the memoir and identify literary devices, voice, tone, and other literary elements at play in the memoir. 

Building Writing Skills 

Students get to move from the sidelines to the court as they put their analysis into practice and begin writing their own Six-Word Memoir. 

Students think through themes and larger, complex stories, and wrestle with how to curate that story into just six words. 

Because students have just six words to use, they have the space, time, and incentive to put an exceptional amount of care into their writing. Introduce the Six-Word Memoir and watch your students pour over those 6 words for an amazingly long time. 

Introducing the Writing Process

Six-Word Memoir is a perfect writing assignment for the beginning of the year because it’s short enough to teach or review the entire writing process without stealing days and weeks of instructional minutes. 

Collecting Writing Samples

Many teachers experience pressure to collect data on students or give feedback to parents or other teachers within the first few weeks of school. This can be next to impossible for us English teachers with our 200 plus students and the nature of reading, evaluating, and giving feedback on writing. 

With Six-Word Memoirs, teachers can quickly gain a basic sense of student writing ability. I recommend asking students to end with a reflection or a single paragraph analyzing their own memoir. This gives you more to work with should you need it and allows you to see two types of writing: narrative and analytical. 

Why Students Love Six-Word Memoir

Students love Six-Word Memoir activity because it’s highly engaging and a little addictive. Six-Word Memoir are so short and simple that it can actually be quite hard to stop reading them once you get going. 

Writing Six-Word Memoirs is also oddly addictive. They’re just easy enough that you feel satisfied easily, yet we all have such multifaceted lives that we find we have more stories we want to tell or other ways we want to tell them. 

Six-Word Memoirs allow us to give just enough detail that they can be incredibly personal, but they also prevent us from getting too much in the details. Plus, students love the level of choice involved: they can tell a surface-level story about going to Disneyland with their dad or a more personal story about losing their dog, their parents’ divorce, or being bullied in 3rd grade. It’s their choice.

Students also have a ton of choice when it comes to tone. Some Six-Word Memoirs will make you cry; some will make you laugh; and others will inspire you to close the laptop and get out there to make the world a better place. 

Finally, students love seeing memoirs from their favorite celebrities, their teachers, and their classmates as a wonderful way to get to know each other in ways they never have before – even if they’ve been in school together since first grade. 

How to Teach Six-Word Memoir

1. introduce memoir.

Start by introducing the genre of memoir. I like to describe it as “fictionalized autobiography” – meaning that the essence is true, but every tiny detail may not be factual the way it needs to be in a biography.

This description also invites the conversation about the role characterization and literary devices play in writing memoir. 

2. Analyze Examples of Six-Word Memoirs 

Next, you’ll want to gather a few really great examples of memoirs for students to look at and discuss. If you plan to use the Six-Word Memoir activity to teach diction and syntax, choose examples that align with that goal. 

Some questions you might pose to the class are: What story does the memoir tell? HOW does it tell the story effectively? …Or ineffectively, of course?

I also like to include 1 or 2 Six-Word Memoirs that I feel demonstrate weaker writing or that don’t meet my expectations. 

3. Introduce the Writing Process: Brainstorm Topics & Invite Revision

Encourage students to brainstorm several ideas for topics before committing to just one. It might also be useful to have some prompts and suggestions in mind for students who feel stuck. Many times, students get the idea that memoir is for writing about traumatic, heroic, or otherwise exceptional experiences, and therefore, they can’t possibly fit in. 

Help them break this assumption by encouraging them to write about common topics like first love, simple everyday moments with pets, special days with family, birthdays, moving, moments of confusion or fear like being lost as a child, etc. 

As students write, encourage them to ask themselves how hard each word is “working” in the memoir – is it earning its keep? 

Another suggestion is to ask them to write the memoir in 3 different ways before committing to one. Again, the Six-Word Memoir is wonderful for teaching the writing process because it’s so short – we’d never ask students to write an essay in 3 different ways, yet a Six-Word Memoir is short enough to help students see the myriad ways an idea can be expressed. 

4. Give Space and Time

Six-Word Memoirs are so short that it can be tempting to rush it along, but this is an activity worth spending the time on – after all, you’re killing two birds with one stone by building community and teaching content, right? 

Allow students the time they need to get their Six-Word Memoir exactly as they’d like. This activity is an awesome one for introducing after you’ve set up your independent reading routine so that those students who finish early have something to do while others are still working. 

5. Provide Opportunities for Sharing

When it comes to building community with Six-Word Memoir, the magic really happens in the sharing. 

There are lots of ways to invite sharing. 

Teachers can go traditional or old school with quick presentations: Students can share their memoir with the class and share anything else they’d like about the story or their writing process. I like to have students sit in a large circle for this one in order to make it feel less intimidating at the start of the year.

Alternatively, teachers can invite sharing through a silent gallery walk: Students set their memoir on their desk and then move around the room as they read each memoir. I love to give students post-it notes as they walk around, so they can leave compliments or questions for the author. 

I always wrap up with an overall discussion – takeaways about shared experiences in the classroom, what they learned about each other, a reflection on the writing process or their experience with writing a Six-Word Memoir.

Join the Conversation

Have you tried Six-Word Memoir yet? Tell us all about it in the comments!

Looking for ready-made materials for teaching Six-Word Memoir? 

Check out Jen’s Six-Word Memoir activity , which has ready-to-go materials for teaching Six-Word Memoir, including defining the memoir genre, introducing diction and syntax, sample Six-Word Memoirs for discussion (with sample analysis!), prompts to get students going, and materials for guiding students through the writing process. 

Note: Six-Word Memoir is a registered Trademark. The Six-Word Memoir format is used with permission of Larry Smith, founder of The Six-Word Memoir Project. For more information about Six-Word Memoirs and how to create your own classroom book, see  www.sixinschools.com .

6 word memoir assignment high school

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6 word memoir assignment high school

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The Marginalian

Illustrated Six-Word Memoirs by Students from Grade School to Grad School

By maria popova.

6 word memoir assignment high school

In the introduction, Smith speaks to the liberating quality of constraints :

As an autobiographical challenge, the six-word limitation forces us to pinpoint who we are and what matters most — at least in the moment. The constraint fuels rather than limits our creativity.

The micro-memoirs are divided into four sections — grade school, high school, college, and graduate school — and touch, with equal parts wit and disarming candor, on everything from teenagers’ internal clocks to the escapism of Alice in Wonderland .

6 word memoir assignment high school

Things Don’t Have To Be Complicated comes on the heels of TED’s The Science of Optimism: Why We’re Hard-Wired for Hope and offers an inadvertent yin to its yang.

— Published January 9, 2013 — https://www.themarginalian.org/2013/01/09/six-word-memoirs-students/ —

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Freshman English

Memoir General Information

Characteristics of the Memoir Form

  • Focus on a brief period of time or series of related events
  • Narrative structure, including many of the usual elements of storytelling such as setting, plot development, imagery, conflict, characterization, foreshadowing and flashback, and irony and symbolism
  • The writer's contemplation of the meaning of these events in retrospect
  • A fictional quality even though the story is true
  • Higher emotional level
  • More personal reconstruction of the events and their impact
  • Therapeutic experience for the memoirist, especially when the memoir is of the crisis or survival type of memoir

Writing the Memoir

  • To write a memoir, begin by brainstorming on paper all the events you can remember from your life that were either very important to you in a positive way, or very important to you in a negative way.
  • Talk to other members of your family to get ideas, help you remember events from when you were small, and to help fill in the details that might have been forgotten.
  • Select the event, or series of related events, that seems most interesting to you right now. Brainstorm again but in more detail, trying to recall names, places, descriptions, voices, conversations, things, and all the other details that will make this turn into an interesting memoir.
  • Work at this note taking stage for a few days, until you feel you've got it all down on paper. Then begin to write.
  • You will be surprised to see that even more details begin to appear once you start to write.
  • For your first draft, write quickly to get all your ideas down from beginning to end. Don't worry about editing.
  • Before you revise, share your first draft with someone in the family.
  • Consider their response, but go with what feels right. Rewrite, and then start editing as needed. Good memoirs are about everyday things, but they are interesting, sometimes just as interesting to read as a good novel.
  • But remember, a memoir is supposed to be true, so be careful not to exaggerate or embellish the truth.

Step 8: Formative Assessment Freedom Writers Memoir and Website

Go to the Freedom Writers web site below and read about how a group of high school students from Los Angeles made the decision to change their life story. Coming from a crime and gang ridden environment, they began to use reading and writing to change their lives. Read this short memoir about them and in your Readers Notebook write a paragraph describing who the Freedom Writers are, what their lives were like before and what they are doing now? What happened to them for them to believe not only in themselves but also in how they had control over their future?

http://www.freedomwritersfoundation.org/site/c.kqIXL2PFJtH/b.2286937/k.5487/About_Freedom_Writers.htm

Step 9: Formative Assessment Art and Craft of a Memoir

Below is a hyperlink for the Art and Craft of a Memoir. Read the information in this selection and in your Readers Notebook answer the three questions.

art and craft of memoir.pdf

Step 10: Formative Assessment Definition of a Memoir

Below is a hyperlink for the Definition of a Memoir. In your Readers Notebook complete the column below including information about how the Memoir and Autobiography are the same and different.

Definition of Memoir.pdf

Step 11: Formative Assessment Six Word Memoir

Go to the web site below and view the examples of Six Word Memoirs created by high school students. As you are viewing the Memoirs, select two that you really like and in your Readers Notebook explain why you like these. In the six words that the author uses, what is he or she telling you about his or her life?

Six Word Memoirs for Teens

Step 12: Formative Assessment Memorable Events in Your Life Timeline

In your Readers Notebook create a time line of seven stories or memorable events in your life.

Step 13: Formative Assessment Seven Headlines of Your Life

Using the timeline you created for the seven stories or memorable events in your life, in your Readers Notebook write seven headlines for those stories.

Step 14: Formative Assessment Six Word Story of Your Life

Using the headlines from the memorable events in your life, create your own Six Word Story of your life. Use active, precise verbs, concrete nouns, adjectives and adverbs in your Six Word Stories.

Memoir Rubric

memoir rubric.pdf

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6 Word Memoir Getting to Know You Activities High School & Middle School

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6 word memoir assignment high school

Description

This Six Word Memoir Project is a perfect back to school icebreaker for high school or middle school students. Build classroom community while teaching important ELA writing concepts like diction, syntax, and the writing process. This EDITABLE, NO PREP, GOOGLE SLIDES six Word Memoir writing activity is a fun and engaging getting to know you activity for high school or middle school students as well as an excellent way to introduce any identity unit or memoir unit.

This activity is editable so you can meet the unique needs of your students. This activity is also formatted to be printable as well as digital.

Six-Word Memoir is a registered Trademark. The Six-Word Memoir format is used with permission of Larry Smith, founder of The Six-Word Memoir Project. For more information about Six-Word Memoirs and how to create your own classroom book, see  www.sixinschools.com .

What is included in this resource?

Teacher Guide : Directions for teachers facilitating this activity. Includes discussion prompts and step-by-step directions.

Student-Friendly Directions : Clear directions to guide students through the activity. The directions include step-by-step directions and open-ended prompts to help guide students in sharing about themselves and writing their six-word memoir.

EDITABLE Six-Word Memoir Presentation : A 40-slide presentation includes:

  • An overview of the memoir genre and it's benefits and purpose
  • Background information about the origin of the six-word story and memoir
  • Explanations for each step of the writing process (prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing)
  • Explanations for diction and syntax with several opportunities for practice
  • 4 Sample Six-Word Memoirs
  • 1 NON-Example Six-Word Memoir
  • Instructions for peer review
  • Directions for a gallery word to showcase student memoirs

Answer Keys, Teacher Notes & Detailed Analysis : Analysis explaining the effect of the author's choices around diction and syntax for EACH of the four sample memoirs saves you time and reinforces what students have learned about diction and syntax.

EDITABLE Six-Word Memoir Notes Page : A guided note sheet is provided where students can highlight information and record notes about memoir, the writing process, diction, syntax, and more.

EDITABLE Scaffolded Six-Word Memoir Draft Template : Includes directions and spaces to guide students through writing and revising their six-word memoirs, including a space for peer review feedback.

Rubric : A rubric to help students create quality memoirs that meet the assignment goals.

Designed for Digital / Distance Learning AND Print : A link to a separate file with JUST the slides your digital students need for the activity.

Activity Duration:

This activity will take about 2 hours.

Sample pacing from my own class :

- 15 minutes: Introduce the project and provide an overview & discussion of the memoir genre

- 15 minutes: Teach diction & syntax and review examples

- 30-45 minutes: Discuss and analyze sample memoirs

- 30-60 minutes: Draft the memoirs and Revise to 6 words

- (optional) 15 minutes: Present memoirs in a gallery walk

Final Notes and Details:

Please note, this activity is created in GOOGLE SLIDES and is EDITABLE so you can meet the unique needs of your students.

**This resource is a PDF with links to Google Slides documents. However, the documents can also be downloaded from Google Slides as POWERPOINT files or PDF files if you prefer (file, download as, choose your format)

Other Products You May be Interested In:

  • Back to School Activity Bundle
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Cover Credit: Thank you to Aneta Designs for the watercolor strokes in the product cover.

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19 Unique And Fabulous Experiences In Moscow

6 word memoir assignment high school

  • Destinations

Thinking of visiting Russia? When visiting such a famous city, one must, of course, visit the iconic landmarks first. Moscow has plenty of those, most of them in the center of the city, which is very well-planned for tourists. Once you’ve seen the sights that are on most travelers’ lists, it’s time to branch out and visit some of the lesser-known sites, and there are some fascinating places to see and things to do.

I know this list is long, but I just couldn’t help myself. You probably won’t have the time to see them all. But that’s okay. Just scroll through the list and choose what sounds the most interesting to you. Where possible, make sure to book in advance, as things can get crowded, especially during high season.

Saint Basil's Cathedral in Moscow, Russia

1. The Red Square, Kremlin, And Surroundings

Red Square (Krasnya Ploshad) is the heart and soul of Russia, and where much of the country’s history has unfolded. This is the most famous landmark in Moscow and indeed the whole country, it’s an absolute must-do! The square is always full of people and has a rather festive atmosphere!

Saint Basil’s Cathedral

This is the famous church with the rainbow-colored, onion-domed roof. The cathedral was commissioned in the 1500s by Ivan the Terrible and according to legend, the Tsar thought it was so beautiful, that he ordered that the architect’s eyes be cut out afterward, so he could never build anything more beautiful! He wasn’t called Ivan the Terrible for no reason!

Lenin’s Mausoleum

The “love-it-or-hate-it” of tourist attractions in Russia. A glass sarcophagus containing the embalmed body of Russian revolutionary, Vladimir Lenin. It may seem a bit bizarre to display the mummy of a person, but it has been there for almost half a century and the 2.5 million visitors who come each year, clearly feel the queuing and thorough body search are worth it, to be in Lenin’s presence.

Pro Tip: no photos and no loud talking are allowed inside the Mausoleum.

Eternal Flame

There is an Eternal Flame in honor of an unknown soldier on the left side of Red Square. The hourly changing of the guards is worth seeing.

The Kremlin is the official residence of the Russian president. You can see it from the outside, or you can take an excursion to one of the museums located inside. This is the biggest active fortress in Europe, and holds a week’s worth of attractions! Once behind the 7,332-feet of walls, there are five squares, four cathedrals, 20 towers, various museums, and the world’s largest bell and cannon to see. Worth a special mention is the Armory Chamber that houses a collection of the famous Faberge Eggs.

Pro Tip: You can only go inside the Kremlin if you are part of a tourist group.

Interior of the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscos

2. Bolshoi Theatre

Bolshoi Theatre translates to “The Big Theatre” in Russian, and the building is home to both the Bolshoi Ballet and Bolshoi Opera — among the oldest and most famous ballet and opera companies in the world.

Pro Tip: It’s hard to get an inexpensive ticket, so if you’re reading well in advance of going to Moscow then try buying tickets on the official website . Last-minute tickets cost around $250 per person. If this is out of your budget, about an hour before a performance, you can try buying a ticket at the entrance from a reseller. Most can speak enough English to negotiate the price.

Tour the Bolshoi Theatre: You can take a group guided tour of the Bolshoi Theatre which focuses on the history and architecture of the theatre and behind the scenes. There’s an English language tour that lasts 2 hours and costs around $300 for a group of up to six.

GUM, a popular department store in Moscow

3. Luxury Shopping At GUM And TSUM

Russia’s main department store, GUM, has a stunning interior that is home to over 100 high-end boutiques, selling a variety of brands: from luxurious Dior to the more affordable Zara. Even if shopping is not on your Moscow to-do list GUM is still worth a visit; the glass-roofed arcade faces Red Square and offers a variety of classy eateries. TSUM, one of the biggest luxury malls in town, is right behind the Bolshoi and GUM. It’s an imposing building with lots of history, and worth a visit just for its design and its glass roof.

Christ the Savior Cathedral in Moscow

4. Christ The Savior Cathedral

This is one of Russia’s most visited cathedrals and is a newer addition to the gorgeous array of Muscovite cathedrals, but don’t let its young age fool you. After perestroika, in the early 90s, the revived Russian Orthodox Church was given permission to build a cathedral on this site. It did the location honors and built the largest temple of the Christian Orthodox Church. The façade is as grand as you’d expect, but it’s the inside that will mesmerize you, with its domes, gold, gorgeous paintings, and decor!

The cathedral is located just a few hundred feet away from the Kremlin and was the site of the infamous Pussy Riot protest against Putin back in 2012.

Pro Tip: Bring a shawl to cover your hair as is the local custom.

Gates at Gorky Park in Moscow

5. Gorky Park

Moscow’s premier green space, Gorky Park (Park Gor’kogo) is the city’s biggest and most famous park. There is entertainment on offer here for every taste, from outdoor dancing sessions to yoga classes, volleyball, ping-pong, rollerblading, and bike and boat rental in summer. In winter, half the park turns into a huge ice skating rink. Gorky Park is also home to an open-air movie theater and the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art. There is also Muzeon Art Park, a dynamic contemporary space with a unique collection of 700 sculptures. It is located right in front of Gorky Park.

6. Sparrow Hills Park

If you take a walk from Gorky Park, along the Moscow River embankment, you’ll end up in the city’s other legendary park, Sparrow Hills. Although the park doesn’t offer as many activities as its hip neighbor, it has a great panoramic view of the city

Pro Tip: You can take a free walking tour to all of the above attractions with an English-speaking guide.

River cruise in Moscow

7. River Cruising

One of the best ways to experience Moscow, and see all the famous landmarks, but from a different angle, is from the Moscow River. Take a river cruise. Avoid the tourist crowds. There are little nameless old boats that do the cruise, but if you are looking for a more luxurious experience take the Radisson Blu cruise and enjoy the sights with some good food and a glass of wine.

Moscow Metro station

8. Metro Hopping

Inaugurated in the 1930s, the Moscow Metro system is one of the oldest and most beautiful in the world. Started in Stalinist times, each station is a work of art in its own right. I’d recommend touring the stations between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. This way, you’ll be able to properly see it without the crowds. Ideally, I’d recommend taking a tour with a knowledgeable guide with GuruWalk, who will tell you stories of forgotten stations and how the history of the country is interconnected with the metro development. If going by yourself, then I definitely recommend checking out: Mayakovskaya, Ploschad Revolutsii, Kievskaya, Kropotkinskaya, Kurskaya, and Novoslobodskaya stations.

Visit the free Moscow Metro Museum: For real train enthusiasts, located in the southern vestibule of Sportivnaya station is a small free museum. Here you can take a peek into the driver’s cabin, see a collection of metro tokens from different cities, and see different models of a turnstile, traffic lights, escalator, and more.

Moscow State University at dusk

9. Moscow State University View

In his effort to create a grander Moscow, Stalin had seven skyscrapers built in different parts of town; they’re called the Seven Sisters. The largest of these buildings and the one with the best view is the main building of the Moscow State University. Although this is a little outside the city center, the view is more than worth it.

Izmailovsky Market in Moscow, Russia

10. Izmailovsky Market

Mostly known for the city’s largest flea market, the district of Izmaylovo is home to a maze of shops where you can get just about anything, from artisan crafts to traditional fur hats, handcrafted jewelry, fascinating Soviet memorabilia, and antiquities. It’s also one of Moscow’s largest green spaces. There are often no price tags, so be prepared to haggle a bit. Head to one of the market cafes for a warming mulled wine before continuing your shopping spree.

The History of Vodka Museum is found here, and the museum’s restaurant is the perfect place to sample various brands of the national drink.

Once you’ve covered the more touristy spots, Moscow still has plenty to offer, and the places below will also be full of locals! So for some local vibes, I would strongly recommend the spots below!

The skyscrapers of Moscow City

11. Moscow City

With a completely different vibe, Moscow City (also referred to as Moscow International Business Center) is like a mini Dubai, with lots of impressive tall glass buildings. Here is where you’ll find the best rooftops in towns, like Ruski Restaurant, the highest restaurant both in Moscow City and in Europe. Moscow City is great for crowd-free shopping and the best panoramic views of the city.

Art in the Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow

12. Tretyakov Gallery

Tretyakov Gallery started as the private collection of the Tretyakov brothers, who were 19th-century philanthropists. They gave their private collection to the government after their deaths. If there is just one museum you visit in Moscow, I recommend this one!

Tsaritsyno Museum Reserve, former residence of Catherine the Great

13. Tsaritsyno Museum-Reserve

Tsaritsyno was a residence of Catherine the Great more than two centuries ago. It became derelict during the Soviet era but has now been fully renovated. With its opulently decorated buildings, gardens, meadows, and forests, Tsaritsyno Park is the perfect place for a green respite in Moscow.

Kolomenskoye Museum-Reserve in Moscow

14. Kolomenskoye

A 10-minute metro ride from the city center is Kolomenskoe Museum-Reserve, where you can get an idea of what Russia looked like 200 years ago. You’ll find ancient churches (one dating back to the 16th century), the oldest garden in Moscow, and the wonderful fairytale wooden palace of Tsar Alexey Mikhailovich, father of Peter the Great.

Ostankino TV Tower in Moscow at night

15. Ostankino TV Tower

Built in 1967, Ostankino TV Tower was the tallest free-standing construction in the world at the time, it’s still the 8th tallest building in the world and the highest in Europe. It’s also the best observation deck, with a glass floor and 360-degree views. The speedy elevators take you 1,105 feet in next to no time.

Pro Tip: You need to book in advance; entrance is based on specific ticket times and the capacity is limited and only a certain number of tourists are allowed per day. Don’t forget your passport, you’ll need it to get through security.

The floating bridge of Zaryadye Park in Moscow

16. Zaryadye Park

Zaryadye is a newly opened, landscaped urban park so new you won’t find it in a lot of tour guides. The park is near Red Square and is divided into four climatic zones: forest, steppe, tundra, and floodplains, depicting the variety of climatic zones in Russia.

These last three suggestions are a little quirky, but all are really worth checking out.

17. Museum Of Soviet Arcade Games

Release your inner child playing on 66 arcade machines from the Soviet era! What a great way to spend a couple of hours when tired of visiting museums and palaces. The staff speaks excellent English and are happy to explain how the games work.

The rooftops of Moscow, Russia

18. Moscow Rooftop Tour

Take a 1-hour private Moscow rooftop tour with an experienced roofer. I can just about guarantee none of your friends will be able to say they’ve done it! For your comfort, I recommend wearing comfortable shoes. Take your camera, there are some amazing photo opportunities out there!

A pool at Sanduny Banya in Moscow

19. Sanduny Banya

This classical Russian bathhouse opened its doors in 1808 and is famous for combining traditional Russian banya services with luxurious interiors and service. If you enjoy spas and saunas, then you should experience a Russian bathhouse at least once in your life! Go with an open mind and hire a specialist to steam you as it’s meant to be done — by being beaten repeatedly with a besom (a leafy branch)! This is said to improve circulation, but is best done by a professional!

So there you have my list of things to do in Moscow. I could have gone on and on and on, but I didn’t want to try your patience! There are so many things to do in this vibrant city that you’ll definitely need to allocate several days for exploring.

Here are some other reasons to visit Moscow and Russia:

  • 7 Reasons To Put Moscow On Your Travel Bucket List
  • Russia 30 Years (And 30 Pounds) Ago
  • Massive Mysterious Craters Appearing Again In Siberia

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Born and raised in Sydney, Australia, before moving to Africa at the age of 21, Sarah Kingdom is a mountain climber and guide, traveler, yoga teacher, trail runner, and mother of two. When she is not climbing or traveling she lives on a cattle ranch in central Zambia. She guides and runs trips regularly in India, Nepal, Tibet, Russia, and Ethiopia, taking climbers up Tanzania’s Mount Kilimanjaro numerous times a year.

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6 word memoir assignment high school

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  1. How to Use 6-Word Memoirs in the Classroom

    3. Show examples of Six-Word Memoirs so students can see a variety of ways to think about the topic. 4. Give them time—either 10-15 minutes in class or as a homework assignment—to write their six words, and have each student read theirs aloud. Remember to share your own. 5. Leave time for discussion, either in small groups or with the ...

  2. Six in Schools

    Since we launched the Six-Word Memoir project, educators across the world have found six words to be a terrific classroom assignment and catalyst for self-expression. Here we celebrate students' work from classrooms across the world. ... English Classes at Hononegah Community High School, Rockton, Illinois . October 6, 2022

  3. PDF Say it in six words: Six-word memoir unit

    A memoir is an account of one's life and experiences. Rather than presenting an overview of one's whole life, the memoir focuses on one slim section of one's life and experiences. The story can be told chronologically, but events do not need to be recounted in the order in which they have occurred. An autobiography, unlike a memoir, is ...

  4. PDF Writing a Memoir

    For this writing assignment, you will be the author of a highly reflective and ... that has made you who you are today, or shaped your way of thinking. Requirements: A well-written 3-6 paragraph memoir with a strong lead and a strong conclusion. Typed in black 12 point Arial or Tahoma font, double-spaced. ... The midsummer sun was high in a ...

  5. Exploring the Power of Language with Six-Word Memoirs

    In "Register and Charge: Using Synonym Maps to Explore Connotation," Darren Crovitz and Jessica A. Miller argue that students' typical understanding of the word synonym as meaning "'a word that means the same as another word'" is "at best an oversimplification and at worst a way to end thinking about what words actually signify" (49). They advocate for investigations into language and word ...

  6. 6 Word Memoir: Teaching Ideas for ELA

    Six word memoirs can be a great way for students to experiment with writing without a lot of pressure. You can use them to get to know your students better at the beginning of the year, or to reflect on the school year at the end. Or you can use them during a narrative writing unit, first asking them to craft a narrative about a moment or event ...

  7. 6 Word Memoirs

    Middle School, High School Tags: Memoir; Writing; Log in to add tags to this item. License: Creative Commons Attribution Language: English Media Formats: Downloadable docs, Video. Show More Show Less. Version History. PDF 6 Word Memoir Assignment and Rubric Download View. PDF Examples of Six Word Memoirs-- ... As you get ready to write your own ...

  8. PDF {SIX-WORD MEMOIR Project}

    of your six-word memoir. Because this memoir is only six words, the words you choose must be powerful. Use a thesaurus to change one or two of your average words. 3. Locate an image (online, in a magazine, or one from home) that represents your memoir. "Wrap" your memoir into the image in some creative way. Be sure to include your name on ...

  9. Teens

    Celebrating students' work from classrooms across the world. Since we launched the Six-Word Memoir project, educators of all kinds have found six words to be a terrific classroom assignment and catalyst for self-expression. Make an impact. Support Six Words.

  10. How to Teach Writing and Build Community with Six-Word Memoir

    Again, the Six-Word Memoir is wonderful for teaching the writing process because it's so short - we'd never ask students to write an essay in 3 different ways, yet a Six-Word Memoir is short enough to help students see the myriad ways an idea can be expressed. 4. Give Space and Time. Six-Word Memoirs are so short that it can be tempting ...

  11. Illustrated Six-Word Memoirs by Students from Grade School to Grad

    The micro-memoirs are divided into four sections — grade school, high school, college, and graduate school — and touch, with equal parts wit and disarming candor, on everything from teenagers' internal clocks to the escapism of Alice in Wonderland. Charlotte 'Charley' Berkenbile, 8, is in third grade at Florence Elementary School in ...

  12. Video: "Six Tips for Writing Six-Word Memoirs"

    Defining your life in exactly six words can be the easiest thing in the world, or a seemingly impossible challenge. We've had bestselling memoirists take months to come up with a Six-Word Memoir they were happy with (seriously, one high-lit, household name sent in updates about his progress every couple months), while some of our SMITH Teeners zip out dozens at a time (and hundreds each day).

  13. Six-Word Memoir: What It Means and Best Examples

    Example #2: Try, try again. We fell head over heels for Erica Jong's take on not giving up on love, which was also published on PEN America: "Much married, fourth time is charm.". We don't ...

  14. 9th Grade: Writing the Memoir

    9th Grade. Topic 2. Writing the Memoir. Memoir General Information. Characteristics of the Memoir Form. Focus on a brief period of time or series of related events. Narrative structure, including many of the usual elements of storytelling such as setting, plot development, imagery, conflict, characterization, foreshadowing and flashback, and ...

  15. 6 Word Memoirs

    This unit explores the memoir and writing memoirs using only six words. Subject: Composition and Rhetoric Level: Middle School, High School Material Type: Homework/Assignment, Lesson Plan Author: Sharel Diaz Date Added: 07/08/2023

  16. 6 Word Memoir Getting to Know You Activities High School & Middle ...

    This Six Word Memoir Project is a perfect back to school icebreaker for high school or middle school students. Build classroom community while teaching important ELA writing concepts like diction, syntax, and the writing process. ... Rubric: A rubric to help students create quality memoirs that meet the assignment goals.

  17. Six-Word Memoirs in Schools

    Jennifer Mayberry, a Family and Consumer Sciences teacher at Skowhegan Area High School in Skowhegan, Maine, has introduced Six-Word Memoirs to — wait for it! — all six of her classes. Mayberry initially discovered Six-Word Memoirs in an English methods course at Endicott College and began employing the activity in her classes because of the accessibility of the form.

  18. Home

    THE PRIDE OF THE NORTH! Our school district is a welcoming, high-performing, and thriving district with approximately 2175 amazing, unique, and special students who attend one of our four elementary schools, middle school, high school, or regional non-traditional high school. Centered on the boundary of the fertile, productive agricultural ...

  19. International school in Moscow, private international IB school in

    Brookes Moscow opened its state-of-the-art campus in 2018 welcoming local and international students from age 2 to 18. The only International Baccalaureate (IB) World School in Moscow authorized across the Primary Years Programme (PYP), Middle Years Programme (MYP) and Diploma Programme (DP), Brookes Moscow shares a common philosophy and commitment to high-quality, challenging, international ...

  20. Classroom of the Week: Ridgeview High School

    This week's student Six-Word savants attend Ridgeview High School in Orange Park, FL. English/Language Arts teacher Susan Mullen begins her lesson plan by trying to convey the power and art that can be encompassed in something as small as a single sentence. "I've been using lessons and activities from a wonderful book by Stanley Fish, How ...

  21. 19 Unique And Fabulous Experiences In Moscow

    5. Gorky Park. Moscow's premier green space, Gorky Park (Park Gor'kogo) is the city's biggest and most famous park. There is entertainment on offer here for every taste, from outdoor dancing sessions to yoga classes, volleyball, ping-pong, rollerblading, and bike and boat rental in summer.

  22. Moscow to Revolutionize School Education with Online School ...

    Moscow Online School has generated immediate results: in less than one year after the project launch Moscow authorities have indicated 15% growth of academic progress in the schools participating ...

  23. Six-Word Memoirs

    Build camaraderie. In settings such as in boardrooms, classrooms, staff retreats, and conferences, Six-Word Memoirs® is a simple concept that's become an effective tool to spark conversation, crystalize goals, and boil anything down to its core. Larry Smith has spoken at conferences across the world and led workshops in companies such as ...